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New and Old Environmental Impacts on Population Well Being in an On-Going Pandemic Context

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 August 2022) | Viewed by 3452

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
C-TAC, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minho, 4704-553 Braga, Portugal
Interests: LFN; urban pollution; urban noise; urban air pollution
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Geography Department and Lab2PT – Landscape, Heritage and Territory Laboratory, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
Interests: sustainable management; cultural tourism; local and regional development

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Lab2PT—Landscape, Heritage and Territory Laboratory, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
Interests: sustainable management; LFN and health effects; regional and local development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

What is the impact of the environment on population wellbeing? Why is it important? To date, COVID-19 continues to be a challenge to global public health. The COVID-19 pandemic is a global health emergency with a severe aftermath for human health and wellbeing. However, it can also serve as an example that changes in human interaction with the environment can improve air and noise quality and can reduce our carbon footprint, which leads to improved environmental health. In fact, the environment affects our health in a variety of ways. These environmental impacts can affect human health in many ways, including both short-term and long-term effects. Among these threats is an increasing incidence of allergies and cancer caused by air pollution, land, and water. How does a pandemic lockdown distress the environment of the city and what is its effect on human wellbeing? Climate change is also posing risks to human population health and wellbeing, affecting, for example, allergies, extreme heat, and outbreaks of infectious disease caused by habitat disruption. These phenomena that affect particularly urban areas, in a pandemic context, are often difficult to characterize, predict and mitigate.

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences journal (ISSN 2076-3417; impact factor: 2.679) aims to provide a forum to discuss the new and old environmental impacts on human well-being, learning from the present health crisis and from past ones. Methodologically, conceptual approaches and empirical ones will be accepted.

Topics of interest include:

  • Evolution of studies about the environment and population wellbeing;
  • Impact of the environment on population wellbeing;
  • New and old environmental impacts on human wellbeing;
  • Pandemic impacts in human wellbeing;
  • Solutions to environmental health issues;
  • Health impacts due to climate change;
  • Methods to measure how to population interact with the environment;
  • Methods and practices to mitigate environmental effects on human wellbeing;
  • Changes in environmental pollution due to the COVID-19 lockdown.

Prof. Dr. Lígia Torres Silva
Prof. Dr. Paula Remoaldo
Dr. Juliana Araújo Alves
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental impacts
  • noise, air and water pollution
  • land-use conflicts
  • outdoor events
  • pandemics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

47 pages, 13906 KiB  
Article
The Use of Collaborative Practices for Climate Change Adaptation in the Tourism Sector until 2040—A Case Study in the Porto Metropolitan Area (Portugal)
by Hélder Silva Lopes, Paula Remoaldo, Vítor Ribeiro and Javier Martín-Vide
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(12), 5835; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12125835 - 8 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2343
Abstract
When climate change became a global concern in the 1980s, mitigation was considered the best strategy to address all challenges. For a long time, it was thought possible to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs), which, according to many experts, brought on [...] Read more.
When climate change became a global concern in the 1980s, mitigation was considered the best strategy to address all challenges. For a long time, it was thought possible to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs), which, according to many experts, brought on an unfit adaptation. There are international agreements designed to significantly reduce CO2 emissions and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050, but the policy measures taken so far are insufficient to achieve this goal. In addition, the crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the relevance of placing this issue at the core of international policies and the need for bottom-up measures and options. The purpose of this paper is to explore how collaborative planning can contribute to adapting the urban tourism sector to climate change in the Porto Metropolitan Area (PMA), located in the northern region of mainland Portugal. In this investigation, we used mixed methods based on the following: (1) the discussion of urban tourism’s adaptation planning to climate change with undergraduate students; (2) the application of a modified Delphi questionnaire survey, to 47 international researchers and technicians in the first round and 35 international researchers and technicians in the second round, about the predictability of the adaptation measures; and (3) a theoretical-practical workshop aimed to discuss the main action intentions and ways of adaptation in the short and medium term. All empirical data were collected during the year of 2021. This research highlights the need for more detailed information, the weak interaction between stakeholders and the limitation of resources. Our research identifies the main impacts and local vulnerabilities and determines priorities for adaptation and implementation of actions, aimed at mitigating the effects of climate change and maintaining tourism attractiveness in urban areas. In addition, this investigation allowed the definition of a research agenda, which seeks to guide the area of tourism climatology regarding the new challenges imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
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