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Intelligent Approaches in Predicting Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport Volume II

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Earth Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 3173

Special Issue Editor

Department of River-Coastal Science and Engineering, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, LA 70118, USA
Interests: modeling of storm surge, hurricane waves, and sediment transport and morphological developments in coastal and estuarine areas
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a continuation of our previous Special Issue, which was entitled "Intelligent Approaches in Predicting Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport".

The objective of this Special Issue is to introduce intelligent and innovative approaches into the prediction of hydrodynamics and sediment transport in riverine, coastal, and estuarine areas. These approaches may cover, but are not limited to, aspects of data collection, model development/improvement, process parametrization, numerical experiment design, and results analysis. We encourage studies of stage/water level, streamflow/current, storm surge, waves, salinity, temperature, sediment transport, short- and long-term morphological changes in rivers, lakes, bays, deltas, and coasts. We are also interested in the impacts of extreme events (e.g., flood, cold fronts, and tropical storm), land subsidence, sea level rise and human activities (e.g., deep waterway projects, sediment diversion projects, navigation channel dredging, and hydraulic structures). The applications of new techniques/methodologies in modeling, such as data assimilation, remote sensing, neutral networks, machine learning, and high-performance computing, are especially welcome.  

Dr. Kelin Hu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • modeling
  • hydrodynamics
  • sediment transport
  • morphological change
  • estuaries and coasts
  • storm surge
  • human impacts

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 8991 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Impact of Climate Change on Streamflow and Sediment in the Nagavali and Vamsadhara Watersheds in India
by Nageswara Reddy Nagireddy, Venkata Reddy Keesara, Gundapuneni Venkata Rao, Venkataramana Sridhar and Raghavan Srinivasan
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(13), 7554; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13137554 - 26 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1731
Abstract
Climate-induced changes in precipitation and temperature can have a profound impact on watershed hydrological regimes, ultimately affecting agricultural yields and the quantity and quality of surface water systems. In India, the majority of the watersheds are facing water quality and quantity issues due [...] Read more.
Climate-induced changes in precipitation and temperature can have a profound impact on watershed hydrological regimes, ultimately affecting agricultural yields and the quantity and quality of surface water systems. In India, the majority of the watersheds are facing water quality and quantity issues due to changes in the precipitation and temperature, which requires assessment and adaptive measures. This study seeks to evaluate the effects of climate change on the water quality and quantity at a regional scale in the Nagavali and Vamsadhara watersheds of eastern India. The impact rainfall variations in the study watersheds were modeled using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) with bias-corrected, statistically downscaled models from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-6 (CMIP-6) data for historical (1975–2014), near future (2022–2060), and far future (2061–2100) timeframes using three Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSP) scenarios. The range of projected changes in percentage of mean annual precipitation and mean temperature varies from 0 to 41.7% and 0.7 °C to 2.7 °C in the future climate, which indicates a warmer and wetter climate in the Nagavali and Vamsadhara watersheds. Under SSP245, the average monthly changes in precipitation range from a decrease of 4.6% to an increase of 25.5%, while the corresponding changes in streamflow and sediment yield range from −11.2% to 41.2% and −15.6% to 44.9%, respectively. Similarly, under SSP370, the average monthly change in precipitation ranges from −3.6% to 36.4%, while the corresponding changes in streamflow and sediment yield range from −21.53% to 77.71% and −28.6% to 129.8%. Under SSP585, the average monthly change in precipitation ranges from −2.5% to 60.5%, while the corresponding changes in streamflow and sediment yield range from −15.8% to 134.4% and −21% to 166.5%. In the Nagavali and Vamsadhara watersheds, historical simulations indicate that 2438 and 5120 sq. km of basin areas, respectively, were subjected to high soil erosion. In contrast, under the far future Cold-Wet SSP585 scenario, 7468 and 9426 sq. km of basin areas in the Nagavali and Vamsadhara watersheds, respectively, are projected to experience high soil erosion. These results indicate that increased rainfall in the future (compared to the present) will lead to higher streamflow and sediment yield in both watersheds. This could have negative impacts on soil properties, agricultural lands, and reservoir capacity. Therefore, it is important to implement soil and water management practices in these river basins to reduce sediment loadings and mitigate these negative impacts. Full article
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12 pages, 2133 KiB  
Article
Use of Underwater-Image Color to Determine Suspended-Sediment Concentrations Transported to Coastal Regions
by Woochul Kang, Kyungsu Lee and Seongyun Kim
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 7219; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13127219 - 16 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1163
Abstract
The amount of suspended sediment transported from rivers to the ocean fluctuates over time, with a substantial increase occurring during storm events. This surge in sediment poses numerous challenges to coastal areas, highlighting the importance of accurately assessing the sediment load to address [...] Read more.
The amount of suspended sediment transported from rivers to the ocean fluctuates over time, with a substantial increase occurring during storm events. This surge in sediment poses numerous challenges to coastal areas, highlighting the importance of accurately assessing the sediment load to address these issues. In this study, we developed and experimentally verified a novel method for suspended-sediment-discharge quantification in estuaries and coasts using underwater imaging. Specifically, red clay samples with different particle sizes were introduced into separate tanks containing clean water. After adequate mixing, the concentration, particle size, turbidity, and water quality were measured and analyzed using LISST-200x and EXO2 Multiparameter Sonde sensors. To maintain constant lighting conditions, a camera box was created for filming. Based on the experimental results, a turbidity–concentration relationship formula was derived. The proposed regression equation revealed that the relationship between the turbidity and estimated suspended-sediment concentration was significantly affected by the particle size, and the prediction results were underestimated under high-concentration conditions. Using blue, green, and gray band values, a multiple regression model for estimating suspended-sediment concentrations was developed; its predictions were better than those obtained from the turbidity–concentration relationship. Following efficiency improvements through additional approaches considering underwater-image filming conditions and characteristics of actual streams, estuaries, and coasts, this method could be developed into an easily usable technique for sediment-discharge estimation, helping address sediment-related issues in estuaries and coastal regions. Full article
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