Special Issue "Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Acoustics and Vibrations".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kiseon Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
MT-IT Collaborations Center, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712, Korea
Interests: interdisciplinary engineering; wireless communications; underwater communications and networks; acoustic system design
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Moo-Hyun Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ocean Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Interests: wave mechanics and free-surface flows; computational ocean dynamics; moving particle simulation; ocean structure dynamics; ocean engineering
Prof. Georgy Shevlyakov
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg, 195251, Russia
Interests: robust detection and estimation; robust signal processing under hostile environment; robust communications system analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Seokjoo Shin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Computer Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju 61452, Korea
Tel. 82622306030
Interests: communications system and network analysis; communications signal processing; cyber physical system and cybernetics systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fishery acoustics discipline cover a wide range of research and practical application topics using acoustical devices as sensors in aquatic and ocean environments. Underwater acoustic techniques can be applied to sensing aquatic animals, zooplankton, fish and physical and biological habitat characteristics for biomass estimation and stock assessment.

As a means for fishery acoustics, information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought various useful tools and services, enabling another ICT-based industrial revolution for the last few decades. Subsequently, underwater acoustics and their aquaculture applications have been widely investigated, including information processing and intelligent signal processing techniques over the underwater acoustic channel.   

Fishery acoustics compose a well-defined scientific area physically and theoretically for information of underwater biomass, while information processing and intelligent signal processing engineering complements practical devices, systems for interdisciplinary underwater acoustics. Various tools are emerging from both the underwater acoustic sciences and fishery engineering, and we can fully utilize them. Subsequently, we are expecting a quantum leap in areas of interdisciplinary fishery acoustics, covering stock assessment, aquaculture monitoring system, underwater object monitoring, underwater fishery surveillance, and many more applications for fishery businesses.

This Special Issue is aimed at providing the fishery acoustics community with scientific tools, novel information-processing algorithms and practical systems. Manuscripts are solicited to address a wide range of topics on principles and applications of fishery acoustics, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Shallow underwater channel modeling and data processing
  • Computational ocean dynamics, and moving particle modelling and simulation
  • Robust fishery detection/estimation for fish stock assessment
  • Intelligent signal processing systems for fishery acoustics
  • Emerging aquaculture with the help of information and communications technology
  • Fish finding and stock assessment using underwater acoustics
  • Information processing and intelligent signal processing techniques for fishery
  • Underwater fish tracking and surveillance systems
  • Devices and systems for fishery stock assessment

Prof. Kiseon Kim
Prof. Moo-Hyun Kim
Prof. Georgy Shevlyakov
Prof. Seokjoo Shin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Underwater Acoustics
  • Fishery Acoustics
  • Robust Detection and Estimation
  • ICT-based Interdisciplinary Engineering
  • Fishery Assessment
  • Acoustic, and Underwater Information Processing

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Editorial for Special Issue: Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences, and Practical Applications
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(22), 4774; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9224774 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Fishery acoustics (How to detect and monitor fish and other marine life [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)

Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Real-Time Inverse Estimation of Ocean Wave Spectra from Vessel-Motion Sensors Using Adaptive Kalman Filter
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(14), 2797; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9142797 - 12 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The real-time inverse estimation of the ocean wave spectrum and elevation from a vessel-motion sensor is of significant practical importance, but it is still in the developing stage. The Kalman-filter method has the advantages of real-time estimation, cost reduction, and easy installation than [...] Read more.
The real-time inverse estimation of the ocean wave spectrum and elevation from a vessel-motion sensor is of significant practical importance, but it is still in the developing stage. The Kalman-filter method has the advantages of real-time estimation, cost reduction, and easy installation than other methods. Reasonable estimation of high-frequency waves is important in view of covering various sea states. However, if the vessel is less responsive for high-frequency waves, amplified noise may occur and cause overestimation problem there. In this paper, a configuration of Kalman filter with applying the principle of Wiener filter is proposed to suppress those over-estimations. Over-estimation is significantly reduced at high frequencies when the method is applied, and reliable real-time wave spectra and elevations can be obtained. The simulated sensor data was used, but the proposed algorithm has been proved to perform well for various sea states and different vessels. In addition, the proposed Kalman-filter technique is robust when it is applied to time-varying sea states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Tracking the Movements of Juvenile Chinook Salmon using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle under Payload Control
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(12), 2516; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9122516 - 20 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) under payload control (PC) was used to map the movements of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) tagged with acoustic transmitters. After detecting a tag, the AUV deviated from its pre-programmed route and performed a maneuver designed [...] Read more.
An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) under payload control (PC) was used to map the movements of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) tagged with acoustic transmitters. After detecting a tag, the AUV deviated from its pre-programmed route and performed a maneuver designed to enhance the location estimate of the fish and to move closer to collect proximal environmental data. Nineteen fish were released into marine waters of southeastern Alaska. Seven missions with concurrent AUV and vessel-based surveys were conducted with two to nine fish present in the area per mission. The AUV was able to repeatedly detect and estimate the location of the fish, even when multiple individuals were present. Although less effective at detecting the fish, location estimates from the vessel-based surveys helped verify the veracity of the AUV data. All of the fish left the area within 48 h of release. Most fish exhibited localized movements (milling behavior) before leaving the area. Dispersal rates calculated for the fish suggest that error associated with the location estimates was minimal. The average movement rate was 0.62 body length per second and was comparable to marine movement rates reported for other Chinook salmon stocks. These results suggest that AUV-based payload control can provide an effective method for mapping the movements of marine fish. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparing Fish Density and Echo Strength Distribution Recorded by Two Generations of Single Beam Echo Sounders
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(10), 2041; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9102041 - 17 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Hydroacoustic acquisition was performed by means of two different single beam systems, the Simradmodel EK15 from 2015 and the Simrad model EY-M from the 1980s to explore potential differences of fish density and target strength (TS) distribution between EK15 and EY-M-based estimates. The [...] Read more.
Hydroacoustic acquisition was performed by means of two different single beam systems, the Simradmodel EK15 from 2015 and the Simrad model EY-M from the 1980s to explore potential differences of fish density and target strength (TS) distribution between EK15 and EY-M-based estimates. The oligotrophic Lake Storsjøen (48 km2) with steep shores, was chosen for the survey. The pelagic fish stock is dominated by whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.), and, recently, illegally stocked smelt (Osmerus eperlanus L.), and a low proportion of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.). The total density was estimated at two depth layers (18–32 and 32–48 m), and was quite similar for TS ≥ −56 dB: 755 and 498 fish ha−1, respectively for the EK15-based estimates and similarly 766 and 490 fish ha−1 for the EY-M estimate. Target strength distributions were similar for TS > −48 dB. The proportion of single fish detected with EK15 was negatively affected by the long pulse duration. Six acquisitions from 1986 to 2016 showed a dramatic increase of density of TS = −46 to −44 dB echoes (>10 cm) between 2013 and 2016. This was due to the growth of the introduced smelt population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Variation of Zooplankton Mean Volume Backscattering Strength from Moored and Mobile ADCP Instruments for Diel Vertical Migration Observation
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(9), 1851; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9091851 - 06 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Zooplankton can be detected by using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments through acquiring the mean volume backscattering strength (MVBS) data. However, the precision of the backscattered signal measured by single ADCP measurement has a limitation in the MVBS variation of zooplankton. The [...] Read more.
Zooplankton can be detected by using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments through acquiring the mean volume backscattering strength (MVBS) data. However, the precision of the backscattered signal measured by single ADCP measurement has a limitation in the MVBS variation of zooplankton. The objectives of this study were to analyze the MVBS and vertical velocity from ADCPs at the same time and location for zooplankton’s daily vertical migration (DVM) observation. Measurements were conducted in Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Instruments used included a moored ADCP 750 kHz and a mobile ADCP 307.2 kHz. High MVBS value was found at 11.5–16 m depths and was identified as the sound scattering layer (SSL). The DVM patterns in the SSL displayed significant differences over time and had good relationships with the diurnal cycle. Theoretical target strength (TS) from the scattering models based on a distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) was estimated for Oithona sp. and Paracalanus sp.; the two dominant species found in the observed area. However, ΔMVBS and ΔTS proved that the dominant zooplankton species were not the main scatterers. The strong signal in SSL was instead caused by the schools of various zooplankton species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Monitoring-System Development for a Bottom-Set Gillnet through Time-Domain Dynamic Simulations
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(6), 1210; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9061210 - 22 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper investigates the sensor-based monitoring feasibility of a bottom-set gillnet through time-domain dynamic simulations for various current and wave conditions and failure scenarios. The dimension and design parameters of the bottom-set gillnet were based on an existing model used in Korea, and [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the sensor-based monitoring feasibility of a bottom-set gillnet through time-domain dynamic simulations for various current and wave conditions and failure scenarios. The dimension and design parameters of the bottom-set gillnet were based on an existing model used in Korea, and the measured environmental data were acquired from the southwest coast of Korea and utilized for the dynamic analysis. For efficient numerical modeling of nets, an equivalent net model which uses fewer line elements was considered, and the projected area, wet weight, and axial stiffness were accordingly adjusted. The hydrodynamic forces on the entire gillnet were estimated using a Morison-force model on the instantaneous positions of the net. The designed gillnet provided excellent stretching performance even under low current velocity. The dynamic responses under wave excitations were not significant in operating conditions; however, significant motions were observed in the fishery-prohibition condition. The proposed monitoring system consisted of an accelerometer, tension sensors, and the global positioning system. Numerous line-failure scenarios were simulated, and the proposed monitoring system could effectively detect a specific problem from the combined patterns of sensor signals by a problem-detection algorithm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Acoustic Target Strength of the Endangered Chinese Sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) by Ex Situ Measurements and Theoretical Calculations
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(12), 2554; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8122554 - 10 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The Chinese sturgeon, Acipenser sinensis, is a large anadromous and highly endangered protected species. The assessment of its breeding population in the Yangtze River is critically important for effective management and population preservation. Currently, hydroacoustic methods have been widely used to study [...] Read more.
The Chinese sturgeon, Acipenser sinensis, is a large anadromous and highly endangered protected species. The assessment of its breeding population in the Yangtze River is critically important for effective management and population preservation. Currently, hydroacoustic methods have been widely used to study the adult sturgeons in the river, whereas the acoustic target strength (TS) characteristics of the species have not been studied. In this study, the TS of Chinese sturgeon was carefully evaluated both by ex situ measurements and theoretical calculations. Six Chinese sturgeons (Body Length (BL): 74.0−92.6 cm) were measured by a 199 kHz split echosounder in a 10-m deep net cage. The computed tomography of a Chinese sturgeon (BL: 110.0 cm) was conducted and the Kirchhoff ray mode (KRM) method was used to estimate the theoretical TS. As a result, the mean ex situ TS range of the six specimens was from −26.9 to −31.4 dB, which was very close to the KRM estimation (~1 dB difference). Then, the KRM method was used to predict the TS of Chinese sturgeon as a function of BL in six frequencies commonly used in freshwater environments and to estimate the TS of a representative adult Chinese sturgeon (250 cm) as a function of frequency and tilt angle. This study can provide a good basis for future hydroacoustic studies on the critically endangered Chinese sturgeon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Hydroacoustic and Pressure Turbulence Analysis for the Assessment of Fish Presence and Behavior Upstream of a Vertical Trash Rack at a Run-of-River Hydropower Plant
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(10), 1723; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101723 - 22 Sep 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The spatial distribution of fish upstream of a vertical trash rack was investigated at the hydropower plant Kirchbichl in the alpine River Inn (Tyrol, Austria). The objective of the research project “FIDET” was to establish a non-invasive methodology to study fish presence and [...] Read more.
The spatial distribution of fish upstream of a vertical trash rack was investigated at the hydropower plant Kirchbichl in the alpine River Inn (Tyrol, Austria). The objective of the research project “FIDET” was to establish a non-invasive methodology to study fish presence and flow characteristics at large hydro power sites. A new monitoring approach was developed combining hydroacoustic observations of fish locations with multivariate hydrodynamic data. This was accomplished by utilizing complementary observations from multiple underwater sensor technologies: First, an array of echosounders were deployed at a fixed cross-section upstream of the trash rack for long-term monitoring. Afterwards, detailed underwater surveys with “acoustic cameras” (DIDSON and ARIS) revealed that the spatial distributions of fish in front of the trash rack were highly heterogeneous. The spatial distribution of the flow field was assessed via the time-averaged velocity fields from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). Finally, a custom pressure-based flow turbulence probe was developed, providing spatial estimates of flow turbulence immediately upstream of the trash rack. The significant contribution of this work is to provide a multi-modal monitoring approach incorporating both fish position data and hydrodynamic information. This forms the starting point for a future objective, namely to create an automated, sonar-based detection and control systems to assist and monitor fish protection operations in near real-time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Ultrasonic-Assisted Cutting: A Beneficial Application for Temperature, Torque Reduction, and Cutting Ability Improvement in Deep Drilling of Al-6061
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(10), 1708; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101708 - 20 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper presents an experimental study of the positive effects of vibration-assisted deep drilling of aluminum alloy Al-6061. The four most important evaluation criteria in drilling—machinability, workpiece temperature, torque, and material removal rate—were chosen to be investigated. Holes with a depth-to-diameter ratio of [...] Read more.
This paper presents an experimental study of the positive effects of vibration-assisted deep drilling of aluminum alloy Al-6061. The four most important evaluation criteria in drilling—machinability, workpiece temperature, torque, and material removal rate—were chosen to be investigated. Holes with a depth-to-diameter ratio of 13 were drilled by high speed steel (HSS) twist drill bits of 3 mm diameter, using both methods of conventional drilling (CD) and ultrasonic-assisted drilling (UAD). Three levels of axial force of 6 kgf, 9 kgf, and 12 kgf were kept constant for each pair of comparison experiments. It was found that workpiece temperature and torque not only changed from one drill to the other, but were also dependent on the hole depth being drilled. Comparisons were made in-pair between CD and UAD under the same axial force and at the same order of hole numbers. The result shows that the material removal rate with UAD was up to 3.5 times higher than that with CD and the average workpiece temperature and torque in UAD were reduced by 3.5 and 6 times, respectively. Moreover, tool life in UAD was observed to increase from 2.5 to 5 times, in terms of number of holes drilled, compared to that in CD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Acoustic Target Strength Measurements for Biomass Estimation of Aquaculture Fish, Redlip Mullet (Chelon haematocheilus)
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(9), 1536; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8091536 - 02 Sep 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Redlip mullet (Chelon haematocheilus) is distributed in coastal waters of the North-Western Pacific Ocean and is a cultured fish in Korea. A hydroacoustic technique constitutes a useful method to assess the biomass and spatial distribution of mullet in sea cages or [...] Read more.
Redlip mullet (Chelon haematocheilus) is distributed in coastal waters of the North-Western Pacific Ocean and is a cultured fish in Korea. A hydroacoustic technique constitutes a useful method to assess the biomass and spatial distribution of mullet in sea cages or in coastal waters, and acoustic target strength (TS) information of the target fish is an essential parameter in using this method. In this study, ex situ TS measurements of 16 live mullets were made in an aquaculture sea cage in Korea. The split-beam scientific echo-sounder used for measurements was comprised of 38, 120, 200, and 420 kHz frequencies. An underwater video camera was simultaneously used to observe the mullets’ behavior during the TS measurements. The mullet TS data was analyzed from a wide range of total fish length (FL: 14.3–40.3 cm). As results for all frequencies, the frequency dependence of the mean TS values were relatively low, and the difference in mean TS was within 2.5 dB. When the slope of the least-squares regression line was forced to 20 into the TS equation, the resulting value for the constant term (b20) at each frequency was −67.0 dB, −68.3 dB, −66.3 dB, and −68.5 dB, respectively. The data tended to be frequency dependent. Additionally, the maximum TS appeared between tilt angles of 0° and 10°. These results indicate that TS measurements can be applied to estimate the biomass of the mullet in sea cages or in coastal waters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Response Prediction and Monitoring Feasibility of a Stow Net System Using Measured Environmental Data in the Southwest Coast of Korea
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(9), 1517; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8091517 - 01 Sep 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
This paper investigates the response characteristics of a stow net under wave and current excitations, as well as the feasibility of its monitoring system to check net functionality and prevent loss of fishing gears. The stow-net model is based on one of existing [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the response characteristics of a stow net under wave and current excitations, as well as the feasibility of its monitoring system to check net functionality and prevent loss of fishing gears. The stow-net model is based on one of existing types used in southwest coast of South Korea. The measured wave and current data there are acquired and inputted as environmental loads for numerical simulations. The Morison equation for a moving object with equivalent net model is utilized as the external-force estimator, which has been validated by many researchers regarding fish-cage studies. Since the modelling of all the net elements is inefficient in terms of computational time in time-domain simulations, cruder equivalent-drag net elements are devised with equivalent wet mass, projected area, and axial stiffness. The performance of stow net is highly influenced by current velocity. Stow nets submerge more in stronger currents, which results in less wave forces. The proposed monitoring system can provide useful information, such as net functionality and loss of stow net, using the minimum number of monitoring sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fishery Acoustics, Applied Sciences and Practical Applications)
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