Special Issue "Extreme Sciences and Engineering"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Sakdirat Kaewunruen

Birmingham Centre for Railway Research and Education, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B152TT, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: rail infrastructure; structural engineering, dynamics, reliability and safety; impact engineering
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Xinzheng Lu

Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Extreme events, multi-hazards, accidents, disaster, resilience, critical infrastructure, numerical methods
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alex M. Remennikov

University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Blast, physical threats, extreme loading, impact engineering, structural engineering, buildings, infrastructure design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Disruptions in the operation of our countries’ infrastructure may put at risk the functioning of our societies and their economies. Such disruptions may result from many kinds of hazards and physical and/or cyber-attacks on installations and systems. Recent events demonstrate the increased interconnection among the impact of hazards, of the two kinds of attacks and, conversely, the usefulness for operators to combine cyber and physical security-solutions to protect installations of the critical infrastructure globally. New ideas and innovation for comprehensive, yet installation-specific approach are necessary to secure the integrity of existing or future, public or private, connected and interdependent assets, installations and infrastructure systems.

This special issue ‘Extreme Sciences and Engineering’ enables transparent, fair, rapid communication of research that highlights the role of mechanics, sciences and engineering in multi-disciplinary areas across materials science, physics, and engineering. Emphasis is on the impact, depth and originality of new concepts, methods and observations at the forefront of applied sciences.

Among the topical areas of interest are, but not limited to:

  • Materials and components of extreme properties
  • Materials and structures under extreme conditions, such as high temperature and high loading rate, natural or man-made hazards, etc.
  • Resilience of assets, components, installations and infrastructure systems
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Instability, large deformation and large-amplitude vibration in nature and engineering systems
  • Interfacial phenomena in interactions between fluids and solids, deformation and failure of materials and structures
  • Self-assembly of materials, components and structural systems
  • Mechanics of 3D printing
  • Earthquakes and Tsunami
  • Digital built environments supporting crisis management, resilience recovery, and sustainability of critical infrastructures (Airport, Rail, Port, Energy, Gas, etc.)
  • Advanced numerical methods for extreme conditions

Dr. Sakdirat Kaewunruen
Prof. Dr. Alex M Remennikov
Prof. Dr. Xinzheng Lu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Extreme conditions
  • Hazards
  • Resilience
  • Reliability
  • Engineering design
  • Mechanics
  • Numerical methods
  • Digital built environment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Idealisations of Dynamic Modelling for Railway Ballast in Flood Conditions
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(9), 1785; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9091785
Received: 3 April 2019 / Revised: 20 April 2019 / Accepted: 25 April 2019 / Published: 29 April 2019
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Abstract
As the main component of a ballasted railway system, railway ballast is frequently used by the railway industry to enhance constructability and practicality. Numerous studies into train–track interactions focused on ballast modelling and idealisation in completely dry environments, but recent studies have found [...] Read more.
As the main component of a ballasted railway system, railway ballast is frequently used by the railway industry to enhance constructability and practicality. Numerous studies into train–track interactions focused on ballast modelling and idealisation in completely dry environments, but recent studies have found that, in extreme weather such as floods, water can clog natural ballast beds and change the initial state of their properties. Ballast models used in multi-body simulations have been mostly developed based on the instrumented impact hammering method considering the ballast as a spring/dashpot. The single degree of freedom (SDOF) idealization for ballast enables a non-destructive field testing technique for monitoring of railway components in practice. In this study, the suitability of the idealization of ballast for dynamic characteristics has been evaluated. A series of experiments have been performed with a variety of ballast conditions in flooding levels from 0 to 40 cm, with a frequency range of 0–500 Hz. The results clearly show that the increase in the flood level will result in increasing dynamic damping of more than 50% of dry natural ballast whilst reducing its stiffness and natural frequency. The novel insights are of great significance for exploring the non-linear dynamic traits of ballast in extreme environments, which can be integrated into the coupled train–track analysis that can better express more realistically the dynamic train–track interaction and load transfer mechanism of flooded railway tracks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Sciences and Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Thermal Behavior of Tunnel Segment Joints Exposed to Fire and Strengthening of Fire-damaged Joints with Concrete-filled Steel Tubes
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(9), 1781; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9091781
Received: 24 March 2019 / Revised: 25 April 2019 / Accepted: 26 April 2019 / Published: 29 April 2019
PDF Full-text (6601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Owing to its discontinuous configuration, segment joint is of particular concern when the shield tunnel lining is exposed to fire. The thermal behavior of such joints when exposed to fire was investigated experimentally in full scale. In addition, the effectiveness of using concrete-filled [...] Read more.
Owing to its discontinuous configuration, segment joint is of particular concern when the shield tunnel lining is exposed to fire. The thermal behavior of such joints when exposed to fire was investigated experimentally in full scale. In addition, the effectiveness of using concrete-filled steel tubes (CFSTs) to restore joint strength after a fire was also investigated. Five full-scale reinforced concrete segment joints were fabricated. Four were exposed to the ISO 834 standard fire for 60 or 120 min, with the fifth serving as a control. Two fire-damaged specimens were then strengthened with CFSTs. All five specimens were then loaded to failure at room temperature. It was found that: (1) The effect of the joint gap on the temperature distribution was observed to change markedly during heating; (2) the temperature of the bolt end was much higher than that of the bolt mid-point, insulating the bolt ends is probably called for; (3) the bearing capacity and flexural stiffness of the fire-damaged segment joints can be significantly improved by strengthening with CFSTs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Sciences and Engineering)
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Figure 1

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