Special Issue "High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Carlos Thomas
Website
Guest Editor
University of Cantabria. E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Av./Los Castros 44, 39005, Santander, Spain
Interests: Eco-Efficient Concrete; recycled aggregate concrete; mechanical and durability properties; repair materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Jorge de Brito
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Georresources, Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: sustainable construction (recycled aggregates in concrete and mortars); bridge and building management systems; buildings service life (prediction); life cycle assessment; construction technology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Valeria Corinaldesi
Website
Guest Editor
Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche 12, 60131, Ancona, Italy
Interests: Eco-Efficient Concrete; Fibre Reinforced Concrete; Recycled Aggregate Concrete; Sustainability in Concrete; Ultra High Performance Concrete

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The benefits of recycling in the construction sector have been widely demonstrated and are unquestionable. The use of recycled aggregates, steel slags, and low-impact cements implies an important reduction of the environmental footprint, and eco-efficient concretes made with them must be a priority. However, these materials show in some cases losses of mechanical and durability behavior compared with natural materials. That is why we must invest our efforts on finding high-performance eco-efficient concretes that can compete or even surpass traditional concrete. To achieve this, research on them and dissemination of its results is essential. The objective of this Special Issue is to group the most recent and relevant research in relation to high-performance eco-efficient concrete into a single document. Subsequently, the possibility of publishing a book with the contributions of all authors will be assessed.

This Special Issue is therefore dedicated to “High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete”, and it intends to welcome contributions on, but not limited to, the following subjects:

  • High-performance eco-efficient concrete using recycled aggregates
  • High-performance eco-efficient concrete using slags
  • High-performance eco-efficient concrete using low-impact binders
  • Mechanical behavior of high-performance eco-efficient concrete
  • Durability of high-performance eco-efficient concrete
  • Rheology of high-performance eco-efficient concrete
  • Permeability of high-performance eco-efficient concrete
  • Fatigue behavior of high-performance eco-efficient concrete
  • Behavior of high-performance eco-efficient concrete in aggressive environments
  • Structural design of high-performance eco-efficient concrete
  • Life cycle assessment of high-performance eco-efficient concrete

Dr. Carlos Thomas
Prof. Dr. Jorge de Brito
Dr. Valeria Corinaldesi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • High-performance;
  • Eco-efficient concrete;
  • Recycled aggregates;
  • Slags;
  • Low impact binders;
  • Technical performance;
  • Environmental performance;
  • Costs

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Alkali Activated Paste and Concrete Based on of Biomass Bottom Ash with Phosphogypsum
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5190; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155190 - 28 Jul 2020
Abstract
There is a growing interest in the development of new cementitious binders for building construction activities. In this study, biomass bottom ash (BBA) was used as aluminosilicate precursor and phosphogypsum (PG) was used as a calcium source. The mixtures of BBA and PG [...] Read more.
There is a growing interest in the development of new cementitious binders for building construction activities. In this study, biomass bottom ash (BBA) was used as aluminosilicate precursor and phosphogypsum (PG) was used as a calcium source. The mixtures of BBA and PG were activated with the sodium hydroxide solution or the mixture of sodium hydroxide solution and sodium silicate hydrate solution. Alkali activated binders were investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) test methods. The compressive strength of hardened paste and fine-grained concrete was also evaluated. After 28 days, the highest compressive strength reached 30.0 MPa—when the BBA was substituted with 15% PG and activated with NaOH solution—which is 14 MPa more than control sample. In addition, BBA fine-grained concrete samples based on BBA with 15% PG substitute activated with NaOH/Na2SiO3 solution showed higher compressive strength compered to when NaOH activator was used −15.4 MPa and 12.9 MPa respectfully. The NaOH/Na2SiO3 activator solution resulted reduced open porosity, so potentially the fine-grained concrete resistance to freeze and thaw increased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Characterization of Prefabricated Bridge Deck Panels Prepared with Prestressed and Sustainable Ultra-High Performance Concrete
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5132; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155132 - 26 Jul 2020
Abstract
Enhanced quality and reduced on-site construction time are the basic features of prefabricated bridge elements and systems. Prefabricated lightweight bridge decks have already started finding their place in accelerated bridge construction (ABC). Therefore, the development of deck panels using high strength and high [...] Read more.
Enhanced quality and reduced on-site construction time are the basic features of prefabricated bridge elements and systems. Prefabricated lightweight bridge decks have already started finding their place in accelerated bridge construction (ABC). Therefore, the development of deck panels using high strength and high performance concrete has become an active area of research. Further optimization in such deck systems is possible using prestressing or replacement of raw materials with sustainable and recyclable materials. This research involves experimental evaluation of six full-depth precast prestressed high strength fiber-reinforced concrete (HSFRC) and six partial-depth sustainable ultra-high performance concrete (sUHPC) composite bridge deck panels. The composite panels comprise UHPC prepared with ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) with the replacement of 30% cement content overlaid by recycled aggregate concrete made with replacement of 30% of coarse aggregates with recycled aggregates. The experimental variables for six HSFRC panels were depth, level of prestressing, and shear reinforcement. The six sUHPC panels were prepared with different shear and flexural reinforcements and sUHPC-normal/recycled aggregate concrete interface. Experimental results exhibit the promise of both systems to serve as an alternative to conventional bridge deck systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Economic and Technical Viability of Using Shotcrete with Coarse Recycled Concrete Aggregates in Deep Tunnels
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(8), 2697; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10082697 - 14 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This work analyzes the technical and economic viability of using coarse recycled aggregates from crushed concrete in shotcrete, as a primary lining support in tunnels. Four incorporation ratios of coarse natural aggregate (CNA) with coarse recycled concrete aggregates from concrete (CRCA) were studied: [...] Read more.
This work analyzes the technical and economic viability of using coarse recycled aggregates from crushed concrete in shotcrete, as a primary lining support in tunnels. Four incorporation ratios of coarse natural aggregate (CNA) with coarse recycled concrete aggregates from concrete (CRCA) were studied: 0%, 20%, 50% and 100%. The mechanical properties of the dry-mix shotcrete were obtained in an independent experimental campaign. Initially, the technical viability of CRCA shotcrete was validated for deep rock tunnels, based on the convergence-confinement method. Two cases were studied to determine the equivalent thickness for each combination of replacement ratio using CRCA shotcrete: (i) similar stiffness and (ii) similar yield stress. Subsequently, an economic assessment was performed. The stiffness criterion increased the thickness below 10% in both the 20% and 50% replacement ratios, which shows their technical viability with very marginal cost increase (<5%). On the other hand, the maximum pressure criteria required higher increments, close to 30% in the 50% replacement ratio. A full replacement was proven to be impracticable in both analyses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
High Performance Self-Compacting Concrete with Electric Arc Furnace Slag Aggregate and Cupola Slag Powder
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 773; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10030773 - 22 Jan 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The development of self-compacting concretes with electric arc furnace slags is a novelty in the field of materials and the production of high-performance concretes with these characteristics is a further achievement. To obtain these high-strength, low-permeability concretes, steel slag aggregates and cupola slag [...] Read more.
The development of self-compacting concretes with electric arc furnace slags is a novelty in the field of materials and the production of high-performance concretes with these characteristics is a further achievement. To obtain these high-strength, low-permeability concretes, steel slag aggregates and cupola slag powder are used. To prove the effectiveness of these concretes, they are compared with control concretes that use diabase aggregates, fly ash, and limestone supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs, also called fillers) and intermediate mix proportions. The high density SCMs give the fresh concrete self-compacting thixotropy using high-density aggregates with no segregation. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the mechanical properties of mortars and concretes shows pozzolanic reactions for the cupola slag. The fulfillment of the demands in terms of stability, flowability, and mechanical properties required for this type of concrete, and the savings of natural resources derived from the valorization of waste, make these sustainable concretes a viable option for countless applications in civil engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Mechanical and Durability Properties of Concrete with Coarse Recycled Aggregate Produced with Electric Arc Furnace Slag Concrete
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010216 - 27 Dec 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The search for more sustainable construction materials, capable of complying with quality standards and current innovation policies, aimed at saving natural resources and reducing global pollution, is one of the greatest present societal challenges. In this study, an innovative recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) [...] Read more.
The search for more sustainable construction materials, capable of complying with quality standards and current innovation policies, aimed at saving natural resources and reducing global pollution, is one of the greatest present societal challenges. In this study, an innovative recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is designed and produced based on the use of a coarse recycled aggregate (CRA) crushing concrete with electric arc furnace slags as aggregate. These slags are a by-product of the steelmaking industry and their use, which avoids the use of natural aggregates, is a new trend in concrete and pavement technology. This paper has investigated the effects of incorporating this type of CRA in concrete at several replacement levels (0%, 20%, 50% and 100% by volume), by means of the physical, mechanical and durability characterization of the mixes. The analysis of the results has allowed the benefits and disadvantages of these new CRAs to be established, by comparing them with those of a natural aggregate concrete (NAC) mix (with 0% CRA incorporation) and with the data available in the literature for concrete made with more common CRA based on construction and demolition waste (CDW). Compared to NAC, similar compressive strength and tensile strength values for all replacement ratios have been obtained. The modulus of elasticity, the resistance to chloride penetration and the resistance to carbonation are less affected by these CRA than when CRA from CDW waste is used. Slight increases in bulk density over 7% were observed for total replacement. Overall, functionally good mechanical and durability properties have been obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
High-Frequency Fatigue Testing of Recycled Aggregate Concrete
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010010 - 18 Dec 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Concrete fatigue behaviour has not been extensively studied, in part because of the difficulty and cost. Some concrete elements subjected to this type of load include the railway superstructure of sleepers or slab track, bridges for both road and rail traffic and the [...] Read more.
Concrete fatigue behaviour has not been extensively studied, in part because of the difficulty and cost. Some concrete elements subjected to this type of load include the railway superstructure of sleepers or slab track, bridges for both road and rail traffic and the foundations of wind turbine towers or offshore structures. In order to address fatigue problems, a methodology was proposed that reduces the lengthy testing time and high cost by increasing the test frequency up to the resonance frequency of the set formed by the specimen and the test machine. After comparing this test method with conventional frequency tests, it was found that tests performed at a high frequency (90 ± 5 Hz) were more conservative than those performed at a moderate frequency (10 Hz); this effect was magnified in those concretes with recycled aggregates coming from crushed concrete (RC-S). In addition, it was found that the resonance frequency of the specimen–test machine set was a parameter capable of identifying whether the specimen was close to failure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop