Special Issue "Diode Laser Spectroscopy – Robust Sensing for Environmental and Industrial Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Steven Wagner
Website
Guest Editor
Reactive Flows and Diagnostics, Technical University of Darmstadt, Otto-Berndt-Straße 3, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany.
Interests: Robust Sensing; High Temperature Process Diagnostics; Combustion Diagnostics; Exhaust Diagnostics; Diode Laser; Absorption Spectroscopy
Dr. Florian Schmidt
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
Interests: Laser spectroscopy; TDLAS Sensing; Combustion Diagnostics; Thermochemical Biomass Conversion; Medical Diagnostics; Breath Gas Analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

After some decades of the development of Diode Laser Spectroscopy from a promising method for laboratory diagnostics to a versatile tool for sensing applications in harsh environments, the method still is evolving further. The growth of many different techniques based on diode lasers in combination with spectroscopic methods, such as direct and wavelength modulation absorption, cavity-enhanced absorption and photoacoustic spectroscopy, illustrates the variety of questions that can be addressed. There are already numerous mature devices and turn-key-systems available commercially. However, they are covering only a small fraction of applications, where the process of interest is accessible by optical diagnostics.

In this Special Issue, we invite submissions on the use of state-of-the-art Diode Laser Spectroscopy for robust sensing in a wide field, from fundamental sciences, environmental physics and biomedical monitoring to its utilization in harsh industrial conditions. Original work highlighting the latest research and technical development is encouraged. Contributions should be focused on the scientific and practical challenges of implementing Diode Laser Spectroscopy, as well as on novel ideas to increase the robustness of the method for monitoring processes and investigating phenomena. Review papers are welcome.

Dr. Steven Wagner
Dr. Florian Schmidt
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diode Laser
  • Absorption
  • Emission
  • Photoacoustic
  • Spectroscopy
  • Robust Sensing
  • Process Monitoring

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Advances in High-Precision NO2 Measurement by Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 1222; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11031222 - 29 Jan 2021
Abstract
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a major tropospheric air pollutant. Its concentration in the atmosphere is most frequently monitored indirectly by chemiluminescence detection or using direct light absorption in the visible range. Both techniques are subject to known biases from other trace [...] Read more.
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a major tropospheric air pollutant. Its concentration in the atmosphere is most frequently monitored indirectly by chemiluminescence detection or using direct light absorption in the visible range. Both techniques are subject to known biases from other trace gases (including water vapor), making accurate measurements at low concentration very challenging. Selective measurements of NO2 in the mid-infrared have been proposed as a promising alternative, but field deployments and comparisons with established techniques remain sparse. Here, we describe the development and validation of a quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer (QCLAS). It relies on a custom-made astigmatic multipass absorption cell and a recently developed low heat dissipation laser driving and a FPGA based data acquisition approach. We demonstrate a sub-pptv precision (1 σ) for NO2 after 150 s integration time. The instrument performance in terms of long-term stability, linearity and field operation capability was assessed in the laboratory and during a two-week inter-comparison campaign at a suburban air pollution monitoring station. Four NO2 instruments corresponding to three different detection techniques (chemiluminescence detection (CLD), cavity-attenuated phase shift (CAPS) spectroscopy and QCLAS) were deployed after calibrating them with three different referencing methods: gas-phase titration of NO, dynamic high-concentration cylinder dilution and permeation. These measurements show that QCLAS is an attractive alternative for high-precision NO2 monitoring. Used in dual-laser configuration, its capabilities can be extended to NO, thus allowing for unambiguous quantification of nitrogen oxides (NOx), which are of key importance in air quality assessments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Martian Multichannel Diode Laser Spectrometer (M-DLS) for In-Situ Atmospheric Composition Measurements on Mars Onboard ExoMars-2022 Landing Platform
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(24), 8805; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10248805 - 09 Dec 2020
Abstract
We present a concept of the Martian multichannel diode laser spectrometer (M-DLS) instrument, a part of the science payload onboard Kazachok landing platform in the framework of the ExoMars mission second stage. The instrument, a laser spectrometer operating in the mid-IR spectral range, [...] Read more.
We present a concept of the Martian multichannel diode laser spectrometer (M-DLS) instrument, a part of the science payload onboard Kazachok landing platform in the framework of the ExoMars mission second stage. The instrument, a laser spectrometer operating in the mid-IR spectral range, is aimed at long-term monitoring of isotopic ratios in main Martian volatiles—carbon dioxide and water vapor—in the near-surface atmosphere. The M-DLS spectrometer utilizes the integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) technique to enhance an effective optical path length and combines high sensitivity and measurement accuracy with relatively simple and robust design. Provided proper compensation of systematic errors by data post-processing, retrievals of main isotopic ratios with relative accuracy of 1% to 3% are expected during at least one Martian year. Full article
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