Smart City and Informatization

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Computing and Artificial Intelligence".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2024) | Viewed by 6734

Special Issue Editors


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Computer Science and Communication Research Centre, School of Technology and Management, Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, Campus 2, Morro do Lena—Alto do Vieiro, Apartado 4163, 2411-901 Leiria, Portugal
Interests: internet of things; SMART IoT ecosystems; internet of unmanned vehicles; industry 4.0; next generation networks and services and ambient assisted living
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Computer Science Department, School of Technology and Management, Computer Science and Communications Research Centre, Polytechnic of Leiria, Campus 2, Morro do Lena – Alto do Vieiro, Apartado 4163, 2411-901 Leiria, Portugal
Interests: smart spaces; smart objects; WSN; systems integration; embedded systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Smart City is a concept in which Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is employed to achieve sustainable urban spaces through the availability of so-called smart products and services, while transforming existing government and governance models and practices (e-government, e-governance and e-democracy). Smart Cities have been seen as the solution to face the challenges of today's urban spaces, including social, environmental, and economical.

Today, several cities have already started the process of becoming smart, but this is a never-ending task. The research community, political personnel as well as the private sector are now learning with those cities that have already started the process, mainly by positioning the citizens at the center of the transformation (citizen-centric). Consequently, the research community and private companies have been researching and working towards the offering of new and improved solutions to approach the transformation through the use of new infrastructures, architectures, services, and devices.

The smart city concept requires the employment of different technologies (IoT, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cloud Computing, Social Sensing, Crowd Sensing, etc.) in different applications domains (healthcare, transportation, education, energy generation, etc.), while keeping social cohesion, sustainability and improving competitiveness. Hence, several challenges are emerging such as security and privacy issues, services scalability and interoperability while engaging with citizens and addressing info-exclusion.

Therefore, the purpose of this Special Issue is to address the latest research results on citizen-centric smart cities with a special focus on the citizens’ and social sciences’ roles without forgetting technical issues such as security and privacy aspects.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following areas for Smart Cities:

  • Social engagement and participation;
  • Social sensing;
  • Crowdsensing;
  • Smart mobility;
  • Citizen-centric products, services, and applications for smart cities;
  • Public institutions and private sector informatization;
  • Smart governance;
  • e-government, e-governance and e-democracy;
  • Digitalization of city systems and services;
  • New architectures and frameworks for smart cities;
  • Mobile broadband and 5G for smart cities;
  • Blockchain applied to the smart city domain;
  • Cloud and Edge computing;
  • Digital twins applied to smart cities;
  • Smart environments in the context of smart cities;
  • Big data analytics for smart cities;
  • Machine learning and artificial intelligence for smart cities;
  • Edge and cloud computing for smart cities;
  • Smart city applications.

Prof. Dr. António Pereira
Dr. Nuno Alexandre Ribeiro Costa
Prof. Dr. Antonio Fernández-Caballero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • smart cities
  • social sensing
  • crowd sensing
  • digitalization
  • smart governance
  • smart services
  • smart products

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 11184 KiB  
Article
Progressing towards Estimates of Local Emissions from Trees in Cities: A Transdisciplinary Framework Integrating Available Municipal Data, AI, and Citizen Science
by Julia Mayer, Martin Memmel, Johannes Ruf, Dhruv Patel, Lena Hoff and Sascha Henninger
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 396; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010396 - 31 Dec 2023
Viewed by 956
Abstract
Urban tree cadastres, crucial for climate adaptation and urban planning, face challenges in maintaining accuracy and completeness. A transdisciplinary approach in Kaiserslautern, Germany, complements existing incomplete tree data with additional precise GPS locations of urban trees. Deep learning models using aerial imagery identify [...] Read more.
Urban tree cadastres, crucial for climate adaptation and urban planning, face challenges in maintaining accuracy and completeness. A transdisciplinary approach in Kaiserslautern, Germany, complements existing incomplete tree data with additional precise GPS locations of urban trees. Deep learning models using aerial imagery identify trees, while other applications employ street view imagery and LIDAR data to collect additional attributes, such as height and crown width. A web application encourages citizen participation in adding features like species and improving datasets for further model training. The initiative aims to minimize resource-intensive maintenance conducted by local administrations, integrate additional features, and improve data quality. Its primary goal is to create transferable AI models utilizing aerial imagery and LIDAR data that can be applied in regions with similar tree populations. The approach includes tree clusters and private trees, which are essential for assessing allergy and ozone potential but are usually not recorded in municipal tree cadastres. The paper highlights the potential of improving tree cadastres for effective urban planning in a transdisciplinary approach, taking into account climate change, health, and public engagement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart City and Informatization)
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10 pages, 15357 KiB  
Communication
A Dynamic Urban Mobility Index from Clustering of Vehicle Speeds in a Tourist-Heavy City
by Marissa Liponhay, Jesus Felix Valenzuela, Michael Dorosan, Damian Dailisan and Christopher Monterola
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(23), 12763; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132312763 - 28 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1008
Abstract
The rapid urbanization of cities often brings about complex mobility issues, such as traffic congestion that, when unplanned, results in decreased productivity and quality of life. While many cities have adopted smart city initiatives to capture and monitor mobility, applying these in a [...] Read more.
The rapid urbanization of cities often brings about complex mobility issues, such as traffic congestion that, when unplanned, results in decreased productivity and quality of life. While many cities have adopted smart city initiatives to capture and monitor mobility, applying these in a developing country context remains a challenge when infrastructure and high-resolution spatial and temporal data are lacking. In this work, we use GPS data obtained from probe vehicles (a mix of public and private transport vehicles) within the city of Baguio, The Philippines, to develop and propose the Zone-based Speed Index (ZSI), a mobility index based on the speed clusters observed in this city. The ZSI dynamically infers monthly speed thresholds to classify zones as fast or slow and successfully captures the decrease in vehicle mobility associated with the impact of typhoons and holidays. Thus, it can be used to characterize urban vehicle mobility with high (hourly) resolution. Insights from the use of our dynamic mobility index are useful in the development and optimization of transportation systems, in monitoring the ease of vehicle mobility, and in the performance assessment of smart city initiatives, which are much needed in tourism hotspots. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart City and Informatization)
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19 pages, 604 KiB  
Article
Behavioral Intentions to Use Energy Efficiency Smart Solutions under the Impact of Social Influence: An Extended TAM Approach
by Marian Mihai Cioc, Ștefan Cătălin Popa, Ana Alexandra Olariu, Cătălina Florentina Popa and Cristian-Bogdan Nica
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(18), 10241; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131810241 - 12 Sep 2023
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Abstract
The role of social influence (SI) as a determining factor in accepting new technologies has been addressed in several studies using the initial or extended technology acceptance model (TAM). This research uses an adaptation of the extended technology acceptance model (TAM) to analyze [...] Read more.
The role of social influence (SI) as a determining factor in accepting new technologies has been addressed in several studies using the initial or extended technology acceptance model (TAM). This research uses an adaptation of the extended technology acceptance model (TAM) to analyze the behavioral intention of Romanian consumers regarding the use of energy efficiency smart solutions (EESS) under the effect of social influence. Data were processed with the structural equation modeling technique (PLS-SEM). The sample consisted of 302 domestic electricity consumers in Romania. The study’s findings show that the respondents’ perceptions of the two social influence dimensions—network of friends, colleagues, or family (SI_FF); and public space (SI_PS)—and their effects on other conceptual model variables are significantly different. The main implications highlight that the proposed model addresses social influence on two levels (SI_FF and SI_PS), to highlight not only the differences in users’ perceptions, but also the main directions in which efforts to promote these technologies should be focused more intensively, in the context of implementing European policies regarding the reduction of energy consumption at the level of household consumers. An important component of the proposed model is the analysis of the role of hedonic motivation constructs, expected performance, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use in mediating the relationship between social influence and behavioral intention to use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart City and Informatization)
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Review

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19 pages, 322 KiB  
Review
Urban Traffic Signal Control under Mixed Traffic Flows: Literature Review
by Željko Majstorović, Leo Tišljarić, Edouard Ivanjko and Tonči Carić
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 4484; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13074484 - 01 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2694
Abstract
Mixed traffic flows are opening up new areas for research and are seen as key drivers in the field of data and services that will make roads safer and more environmentally friendly. Understanding the effects of Connected Vehicles (CVs) and Connected Autonomous Vehicles [...] Read more.
Mixed traffic flows are opening up new areas for research and are seen as key drivers in the field of data and services that will make roads safer and more environmentally friendly. Understanding the effects of Connected Vehicles (CVs) and Connected Autonomous Vehicles (CAVs), as one of the vehicle components of mixed traffic flows, will make it easier to avoid traffic congestion and contribute to the creation of innovative applications and solutions. It is notable that the literature related to the analysis of the impact of mixed traffic flows on traffic signal control in urban areas rarely considers mixed traffic flow containing CVs, CAVs, and Human Driven Vehicles (HDVs). Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the relevant research papers covering the topic of urban Traffic Signal Control (TSC) and mixed traffic flows. Best practices for intersection state estimation and TSC in the case of mixed traffic flows in an urban environment are summarized and possible approaches for utilizing CVs and CAVs as mobile sensors and actuators are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart City and Informatization)
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