Special Issue "Reinforced Concrete Structures: Testing, Modelling and Assessment"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Marcus Ricker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Structural Engineering (IKI), Hochschule Biberach, Karlstraße 6-11, 88400 Biberach an der Riß, Germany
Interests: structural engineering; structural reliability; punching shear failure of flat slabs, footings, and ground slabs; textile-reinforced concrete; anchoring technology; properties of structural materials
Dr. Georg Kocur
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
RWTH Aachen University, Institute of General Mechanics, Eilfschornsteinstraße 18, 52062 Aachen, Germany
Interests: experimental mechanics; non-destructive testing; structural health monitoring; time reversal methods; elastic wave propagation
Dr. Tânia Feiri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Structural Engineering (IKI), Hochschule Biberach, Karlstraße 6-11, 88400 Biberach an der Riß, Germany
Interests: structural engineering; structural reliability; computational analysis; properties of structural materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is widely acknowledged that reinforced concrete (RC) remains a core material in the building sector. However, now more than ever, modern societies are urged to think (again) about the challenges and enablers of this material, while facing demands for longer service lives and lower environmental footprints. Hence, further scientific understanding is needed to reduce continuing epistemic uncertainties of RC associated with environmental and mechanical stressors and material properties, and to adopt the most recent advancements in testing, monitoring and modelling techniques and tools in current practice.

Motivated by this need, this Special Issue in Applied Sciences reports on scientific developments of RC applied to new and existing structures. Thus, we strongly encourage you to send manuscripts containing scientific findings in this field on the following topics: lab and field testing on structural members; non-destructive testing; innovative cementitious materials; metallic and non-metallic reinforcement; structural analysis and design; modelling time-dependent behavior and deterioration; stochastic modeling of loads and resistances; computational analysis; and safety and reliability assessment. Both theoretical and practice-oriented papers, including case studies and reviews, are also recommended.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Ricker
Dr. Georg Kocur
Dr. Tânia Feiri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • testing of structural members
  • non-destructive testing
  • innovative materials
  • metallic and non-metallic reinforcement
  • structural analysis and design
  • computational analysis
  • safety and reliability assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Investigations on Interface Shear Fatigue of Semi-Precast Slabs with Lattice Girders
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(23), 11196; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112311196 - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 186
Abstract
Due to their high cost efficiency and flexibility, semi-precast concrete slabs with lattice girders are widely used in constructions all over the world. Prefabricated concrete slabs, combined with in situ concrete topping, exhibit a quasi-monolithic structural behavior in which lattice girders serve as [...] Read more.
Due to their high cost efficiency and flexibility, semi-precast concrete slabs with lattice girders are widely used in constructions all over the world. Prefabricated concrete slabs, combined with in situ concrete topping, exhibit a quasi-monolithic structural behavior in which lattice girders serve as vertical shear reinforcement and ensure the transfer of longitudinal shear within the interface, acting in combination with concrete-to-concrete bonding mechanisms. To be applicable in industrial and bridge construction, semi-precast slabs need to have sufficient resistance against fatigue failure. To improve and expand the limits of application, theoretical and experimental investigations are conducted at the Institute of Structural Concrete (IMB), RWTH Aachen University. To investigate the fatigue behavior of lattice girders, small size tests with lattice girder diagonals were carried out. These test results have been used to derive an SN curve (S: stress, N: number of load cycles) for lattice girders for a more refined fatigue design. Subsequently, the fatigue behavior of semi-precast slabs with lattice girders was investigated by fatigue tests on single-span slab segments. The fatigue design regulations of lattice girders according to technical approvals can generally be confirmed by this test program; however, they tend to be conservative. The use of the derived SN curve leads to significantly improved agreement of fatigue behavior observed in tests and design expressions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reinforced Concrete Structures: Testing, Modelling and Assessment)
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Article
The Behaviour of Half-Slabs and Hollow-Core Slab in Four-Edge Supported Conditions
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 10354; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110354 - 04 Nov 2021
Viewed by 241
Abstract
In this study, qualitative tests were carried out to compare the behaviour of selected slabs exposed to short- and long-term loading. Full-scale models of the half-slab and hollow-core slab with dimensions of 6.30 m × 6.30 m, built of four different precast panels, [...] Read more.
In this study, qualitative tests were carried out to compare the behaviour of selected slabs exposed to short- and long-term loading. Full-scale models of the half-slab and hollow-core slab with dimensions of 6.30 m × 6.30 m, built of four different precast panels, were tested. The first two were semi-precast lattice girder slabs, the third semi-precast prestressed ribbed panels, and the last was composed of hollow-core panels. A common feature was the lack of joint reinforcement and the same modular width of 600 mm. The short-term load was applied sequentially in the first stage, and displacement was measured using an electronic method. In the second stage of long-term testing, the load was mainly applied to one part of the slab. Testing under short-term and long-term load allows determining the change in the performance of panel slabs over time. The panels maintained the ability of load redistribution based on their interaction despite the work of the longitudinal joints being only through the concrete cross-section. The behaviour of slabs with concrete topping shows more significant lateral interactions than elements connected only by shear key. Comparative calculations were made based on four computational models. Comparative analysis showed that the current design procedures lead to a safe but conservative estimation of the slab behaviour. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reinforced Concrete Structures: Testing, Modelling and Assessment)
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