Special Issue "Applied Cognitive Sciences"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Computing and Artificial Intelligence".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Attila Kovari
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Protection, Institute of Engineering, University of Dunaujvaros, 2400 Dunaújváros, Hungary
Interests: human-computer interfaces, bioinformatics, cognitive systems, IT and mechatronics applications, education
Prof. Dr. Cristina Costescu
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Special Education Department, Babes-Bolyai University, Mihail Kogalniceanu nr. 1, RO- 400084, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: autism spectrum disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders, cognitive and behavioral psychology, medical robotics, psychological evaluation and testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field of investigation of the mind and intelligence. The term cognition refers to different mental processes, including perception, problem solving, learning, decision-making, language use, and emotional experience. The contributions of philosophy and computer science to the investigation of cognition are the basis of cognitive sciences. Computer science is very important in the investigation of cognition, because computer-aided research helps to develop the mental processes, and computers are useful in testing scientific hypotheses about mental organization and functioning. Empirical theories are very important for guiding practice (including education, pedagogy, or psychology) and operational research and engineering, in particular, the design of human-computer interfaces that can be used efficiently without placing too much emphasis on human intellectual abilities. Studies using psychological experiments and computational models are also very important in mental health diagnosis and treatment. Cognitive science plays a significant role in the field of mental illnesses, such as depression, and neurodevelopmental disorders. More specifically the understanding of the possible mechanisms that underlie them and the way interventions work require an understanding of how the mind works. This Special Issue provides a platform for a review of these disciplines and the presentation of cognitive research as an independent field of study.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Applications of human-computer interfaces, human factors, and human performance
  • Artificial intelligence and applications in cognitive sciences
  • Data analytics and computer-aided analysis in cognitive sciences
  • Cognitive learning, interactive education, digital pedagogy, problem solving abilities, applications of adaptive testing
  • Mental health, neurodevelopmental disorders, psychological experiments and applications
  • Emotion representations and signal characteristics that describe and identify emotions or stress, user studies and evaluation techniques for emotion detection
  • Measurement and collection platforms for emotion detection, presentation and applications of emotions

Prof. Dr. Attila Kovari
Prof. Dr. Cristina Costescu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human-computer interfaces
  • artificial intelligence
  • data analytics
  • computer-aided analysis
  • adaptive testing
  • cognitive learning 
  • interactive education
  • digital pedagogy
  • computer based-interventions
  • problem solving
  • mental health
  • neurodevelopmental disorders
  • psychological experiments
  • human factors and human performance
  • emotion representations
  • emotion detection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Application Experiences Using IoT Devices in Education
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7286; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207286 - 18 Oct 2020
Abstract
The Internet of Things (IoT) is becoming a regular part of our lives. The devices can be used in many sectors, such as education and in the learning process. The article describes the possibilities of using commonly available devices such as smart wristbands [...] Read more.
The Internet of Things (IoT) is becoming a regular part of our lives. The devices can be used in many sectors, such as education and in the learning process. The article describes the possibilities of using commonly available devices such as smart wristbands (watches) and eye tracking technology, i.e., using existing technical solutions and methods that rely on the application of sensors while maintaining non-invasiveness. By comparing the data from these devices, we observed how the students’ attention affects their results. We looked for a correlation between eye tracking, heart rate, and student attention and how it all impacts their learning outcomes. We evaluate the obtained data in order to determine whether there is a degree of dependence between concentration and heart rate of students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Cognitive Sciences)
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Open AccessArticle
Case Study: Students’ Code-Tracing Skills and Calibration of Questions for Computer Adaptive Tests
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7044; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207044 - 11 Oct 2020
Abstract
Computer adaptive testing (CAT) enables an individualization of tests and better accuracy of knowledge level determination. In CAT, all test participants receive a uniquely tailored set of questions. The number and the difficulty of the next question depend on whether the respondent’s previous [...] Read more.
Computer adaptive testing (CAT) enables an individualization of tests and better accuracy of knowledge level determination. In CAT, all test participants receive a uniquely tailored set of questions. The number and the difficulty of the next question depend on whether the respondent’s previous answer was correct or incorrect. In order for CAT to work properly, it needs questions with suitably defined levels of difficulty. In this work, the authors compare the results of questions’ difficulty determination given by experts (teachers) and students. Bachelor students of informatics in their first, second, and third year of studies at Subotica Tech—College of Applied Sciences had to answer 44 programming questions in a test and estimate the difficulty for each of those questions. Analyzing the correct answers shows that the basic programming knowledge, taught in the first year of study, evolves very slowly among senior students. The comparison of estimations on questions difficulty highlights that the senior students have a better understanding of basic programming tasks; thus, their estimation of difficulty approximates to that given by the experts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Cognitive Sciences)
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