Special Issue "Climate Change, Carbon Capture, Storage and CO2 Mineralisation Technologies"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nikolaos Koukouzas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Director of Research, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CERTH/CPERI), 52 Egialias str. 15125 Maroussi-Athens, Greece
Interests: CCS; CCUS; reneable energy; energy storage system; petrology; mineralogy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Pavlos Tyrologou
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Research Fellow, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CERTH/CPERI), 52 Egialias str. 15125 Maroussi-Athens, Greece
Interests: climate change; CCU; reneable energy; energy storage system; artificial intelligence
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Petros Koutsovitis
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Research Fellow, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CERTH/CPERI), 52 Egialias str. 15125 Maroussi-Athens, Greece
Interests: petrology; mineralogy; geochemestry; CCUS; reneable energy; energy storage system
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute an article to an upcoming Special Issue titled: “Climate Change, Carbon Capture, Storage and CO2 Mineralisation Technologies” which will be published in Applied Sciences Journal. This special issue is open to researchers and authors that want to submit their research and review articles that explore the application of carbon capture and storage technologies, mitigating the effects of climate change. Special emphasis will be given on mineral carbonation techniques. The aim of this issue is to contribute to the knowledge of the ongoing research regarding climate change and CCS technological applications, focusing on carbon capture and storage practices.

Theme of the Special Issue

Climate change is a global issue that is interrelated with the energy and petroleum industry. In this scope, there is an increasing demand for new low cost and energy efficient techniques that reduce the CO2 emissions. The use of fossil fuels is the primary source of CO2 emissions, which is one of the main greenhouse gases.

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is regarded as one of the most efficient technologies that allows carbon intensive industries to continue to operate with lower CO2 emissions. CCS offers double benefits combining the reduction of greenhouse gas with the direct use of the captured carbon for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). Mineral carbonation is a permanent and secure CCS and sequestration technology that gives the solution in cases of smaller to medium emitters. It is based on the in situ (injecting CO2 into the earth’s surface) or ex situ (chemical reactor systems) production of carbonate minerals through the chemical reaction of CO2 with Ca, Mg and Fe-silicate minerals.

Researchers from the fields of physical sciences and engineering are invited to contribute to our special issue, exchanging the latest research advances in this highly interdisciplinary sector.

Dr. Nikolaos Koukouzas
Dr. Pavlos Tyrologou
Dr. Petros Koutsovitis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • CCS
  • CO2-mineralization
  • CO2-utilization

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
An Experimental and Numerical Study of CO2–Brine-Synthetic Sandstone Interactions under High-Pressure (P)–Temperature (T) Reservoir Conditions
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(16), 3354; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9163354 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
The interaction between CO2 and rock during the process of CO2 capture and storage was investigated via reactions of CO2, formation water, and synthetic sandstone cores in a stainless-steel reactor under high pressure and temperature. Numerical modelling was also [...] Read more.
The interaction between CO2 and rock during the process of CO2 capture and storage was investigated via reactions of CO2, formation water, and synthetic sandstone cores in a stainless-steel reactor under high pressure and temperature. Numerical modelling was also undertaken, with results consistent with experimental outcomes. Both methods indicate that carbonates such as calcite and dolomite readily dissolve, whereas silicates such as quartz, K-feldspar, and albite do not. Core porosity did not change significantly after CO2 injection. No new minerals associated with CO2 injection were observed experimentally, although some quartz and kaolinite precipitated in the numerical modelling. Mineral dissolution is the dominant reaction at the beginning of CO2 injection. Results of experiments have verified the numerical outcomes, with experimentally derived kinetic parameters making the numerical modelling more reliable. The combination of experimental simulations and numerical modelling provides new insights into CO2 dissolution mechanisms in high-pressure/temperature reservoirs and improves understanding of geochemical reactions in CO2-brine-rock systems, with particular relevance to CO2 entry of the reservoir. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Carbon Spheres as CO2 Sorbents
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(16), 3349; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9163349 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
Microporous nanocarbon spheres were prepared by using a microwave assisted solvothermal method. To improve the carbon dioxide adsorption properties, potassium oxalate monohydrate and ethylene diamine (EDA) were employed, and the influence of carbonization temperature on adsorption properties was investigated. For nanocarbon spheres containing [...] Read more.
Microporous nanocarbon spheres were prepared by using a microwave assisted solvothermal method. To improve the carbon dioxide adsorption properties, potassium oxalate monohydrate and ethylene diamine (EDA) were employed, and the influence of carbonization temperature on adsorption properties was investigated. For nanocarbon spheres containing not only activator, but also EDA, an increase in the carbonization temperature from 600 °C to 800 °C resulted in an increase of the specific surface area of nearly 300% (from 439 to 1614 m2/g) and an increase of the CO2 adsorption at 0 °C and 1 bar (from 3.51 to 6.21 mmol/g). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Carbon Footprint of the Agricultural Sector in Qinghai Province, China
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(10), 2047; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9102047 - 17 May 2019
Abstract
The agricultural sector has become an important emitter of greenhouse gases in China. The CO2 emissions in the western undeveloped region have attracted less attention than those in the eastern developed region in China. In this paper, the change in carbon footprint [...] Read more.
The agricultural sector has become an important emitter of greenhouse gases in China. The CO2 emissions in the western undeveloped region have attracted less attention than those in the eastern developed region in China. In this paper, the change in carbon footprint (CF) caused by agrochemical and agricultural energy inputs, the contributions of various inputs to the total carbon footprint (TCF), and the different changing trends between carbon intensity in output value (CV) and carbon intensity in area (CA) in Qinghai province were studied based on the data for agrochemical and energy inputs over 1995–2016. The change in TCF had a roughly stable period over 1995–1999, a slowly decreasing period over 2000–2007, and a rapidly increasing period over 2008–2016, which generally synchronize with the periods of before the Grain for Green Policy (GFGP), during the GFGP, and after the GFGP, respectively. The chemical nitrogen fertilizer and energy inputs were the principal factors influencing the TCF. The N fertilizer was the highest contributor to the TCF and contributed more to the relatively lower TCF during the GFGP in the study area. The relative CF caused by plastic film and diesel input in the study area increased faster than that in the whole country. The CV declined, with a mean of 0.022 kg carbon equivalent (CE)/Chinese Yuan (CNY), which was 55.59% of the mean CV in China over 1995–2016; inversely, the CA obviously rose after 2007, with a mean of 5.11 kg CE/ha, which was only 1.94% of the mean CA in China from 1995 to 2016. Compared with the whole country, Qinghai province generally had a higher rate of increase of carbon efficiency accompanied by a higher rate of increase of CA. The improvements of local agricultural activities should aim to keep a balance between higher carbon efficiency and lower CA in the study area. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Air Purification Performance of Photocatalytic Concrete Paving Blocks after Seven Years of Service
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(9), 1735; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9091735 - 26 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper presents the results of laboratory tests on photocatalytic pavement blocks from a bicycle lane in Poland after seven years of service. Air purification performance was tested on dusty and clean samples using different light sources and setups, with non-laminar gas circulation. [...] Read more.
This paper presents the results of laboratory tests on photocatalytic pavement blocks from a bicycle lane in Poland after seven years of service. Air purification performance was tested on dusty and clean samples using different light sources and setups, with non-laminar gas circulation. Secondary Electrons Secondary Ions (SESI) and InLens detectors combined with SEM–EDS and X-ray analyses were applied to confirm the presence of TiO2 in the studied blocks. The obtained results show that TiO2 was present in the form of agglomerates with a diameter of 0.25–5 µm and was bonded to the cement matrix components. The tested samples still maintained nitric oxide (NO) removal capability with a NO reduction rate of 4–45%, depending on light source and surface cleanliness. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Soil-Gas Concentrations and Flux Monitoring at the Lacq-Rousse CO2-Geological Storage Pilot Site (French Pyrenean Foreland): From Pre-Injection to Post-Injection
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(4), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9040645 - 14 Feb 2019
Abstract
Soil-gas concentrations and flux were measured during 20 separate measurement campaigns at the TOTAL Lacq-Rousse carbon capture and storage (CCS) pilot site, southern France, where 51,000 tons of CO2 were injected in a depleted natural gas field. Baseline data (September 2008 to [...] Read more.
Soil-gas concentrations and flux were measured during 20 separate measurement campaigns at the TOTAL Lacq-Rousse carbon capture and storage (CCS) pilot site, southern France, where 51,000 tons of CO2 were injected in a depleted natural gas field. Baseline data (September 2008 to December 2009) are compared to monitoring data from the injection (March 2010 to March 2013) and post-injection (February 2014 to December 2015) periods. CO2 soil-gas concentrations varied from atmospheric concentrations to more than 16% vol. with 1.4% as median value. Summer data showed high CO2 concentrations in the soil that remained quite high during winter. Median CO2 flux at the soil/atmosphere interface was close to 4.4 cm3·min−1·m−2. Carbon-isotope ratios measured on CO2 in soil gas had a mean value of −23.5 ± 3.1‰, some deviation being due to atmospheric CO2. Comparison between different gas species and the influence of temperature, pressure and soil-water content suggest that gases in near-surface environments are produced locally and naturally, and are unrelated to CO2 ascending from the storage reservoir. Monitoring of CO2 injection and the use of threshold levels is discussed as part of a practical approach considering specific regulations for the Lacq-Rousse CCS pilot experiment and constraints for the site operator. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop