Special Issue "Bacterial Cellulose Biomaterials"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Feliks Junka
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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Parasitology, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 211 Str., 50-534 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: bacterial cellulose, antiseptics, dressings, medical biofilms
Prof. Karol Fijałkowski
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Animal Husbandry, West Pomeranian University of Technology,Szczecin 70-310, Poland
Interests: bacterial cellulose, magnetic fields, immobilization, bioprocess engineering, medical biofilms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial cellulose is undoubtedly the most promising biomaterial in recent decades. The number of studies concerning this fascinating polymer has been rapidly growing and, every year, new potentials for its application are revealed. Some of us surely still reflect upon the fascinating and impressive achievements presented this year during the 4th International Symposium on Bacterial Nanocellulose in Porto, Portugal. Therefore, we would like to invite you to submit your latest research to a Special Issue of Applied Science entitled “Bacterial Cellulose Biomaterials”. We cordially welcome all research articles concerning bacterial cellulose, with special emphasis on results related with its biomedical, bioengineering, and biotechnological applications. We hope that this Special Issue will be a worthwhile compendium of current knowledge which will aid other researchers as they navigate through the exponentially growing data on bacterial cellulose manufacturing and applications.

Dr. Feliks Junka
Prof. Karol Fijałkowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bacterial cellulose
  • biomaterials
  • bioengineering
  • biotechnology
  • biopolymers

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
BNC Biosynthesis with Increased Productivity in a Newly Designed Surface Air-Flow Bioreactor
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 3850; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10113850 - 01 Jun 2020
Abstract
The application of bacterial cellulose (BNC) could be widely expanded if the production costs were reduced. This study aims to determine factors simultaneously affecting the yield and tensile strength of BNC in a newly designed surface air-flow bioreactor (SAF). For this purpose, a [...] Read more.
The application of bacterial cellulose (BNC) could be widely expanded if the production costs were reduced. This study aims to determine factors simultaneously affecting the yield and tensile strength of BNC in a newly designed surface air-flow bioreactor (SAF). For this purpose, a two-stage study was done. Firstly, the most important factors for high yield were determined based on the Plackett–Burman Design. Secondly, impact of the chosen variables on both responses was assessed in a wide range of factor values. The greatest influence on the yield and mechanical strength was proved for such factors as air-flow ratio, glucose concentration, and culture time. The productivity in a SAF bioreactor with controlled air-flow ratio was enhanced by 65%. In terms of mechanical properties, the stress of BNC membranes varied from 0.8 to 6.39 MPa depending on the culture conditions. The results of the performed tests make a useful basis for future optimizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Cellulose Biomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Lactic Acid Modified Natural Rubber–Bacterial Cellulose Composites
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 3583; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10103583 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
Green composite films of natural rubber/bacterial cellulose composites (NRBC) were prepared via a latex aqueous microdispersion process. The acid modified natural rubber/bacterial cellulose composites (ANRBC), in which lactic acid was used, showed significant improvement in mechanical properties, melting temperature, and high resistance to [...] Read more.
Green composite films of natural rubber/bacterial cellulose composites (NRBC) were prepared via a latex aqueous microdispersion process. The acid modified natural rubber/bacterial cellulose composites (ANRBC), in which lactic acid was used, showed significant improvement in mechanical properties, melting temperature, and high resistance to polar and non-polar solvents. The ANRBC films exhibited improved water resistance over that of BC and NRBC films, and possessed a higher resistance to non-polar solvents, such as toluene, than NR and NRBC films. The modification had a slight effect on the degradability of the composite films in soil. The NRBC and ANRBC films were biodegradable; the NRBC80 and ANRBC80 films were degraded completely within 3 months in soil. NRBC and ANRBC showed no antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and did not show cytotoxic effects on the HEK293 and HaCaT cell lines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Cellulose Biomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Potential of Novel Bacterial Cellulose Dressings Chemisorbed with Antiseptics for the Treatment of Oral Biofilm Infections
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(24), 5321; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9245321 - 06 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Infections of the oral cavity are caused by multicellular communities of microbes, referred to as biofilms. Due to the high tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics and specific conditions within the oral cavity, there is an ongoing search for carriers that are able to [...] Read more.
Infections of the oral cavity are caused by multicellular communities of microbes, referred to as biofilms. Due to the high tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics and specific conditions within the oral cavity, there is an ongoing search for carriers that are able to deliver high local concentrations of potent antimicrobials that can eradicate pathogenic biofilms. Bacterial cellulose, owing to its high flexibility, absorbance, and release potential, meets these demands. In this work we chemisorbed bacterial cellulose with antiseptics containing povidone-iodine or polihexanide and analyzed their ability to eradicate in vitro biofilms formed by oral pathogens, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In tests performed by means of standard laboratory methods and with a long contact time (24 h), all antiseptics released from the cellulose dressings displayed a very high antibiofilm efficacy. On the other hand, when conditions imitating the oral cavity were used and cellulose dressings were applied for a 0.5–1 h contact time, the antiseptics released from the dressings displayed lower, though still acceptable, activity. Our findings indicate that besides species-specific resistance to particular antiseptic agents, environmental and experimental settings play an essential role in outcomes. Finally, in a proof-of-concept experiment performed in an oral cavity typodont model, we demonstrated the high flexibility and adhesiveness of antiseptic-containing cellulose dressings. Our novel findings, if developed in further studies, may lead to the introduction of new types of dressings that are able to efficiently deal with biofilm infections of the oral cavity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Cellulose Biomaterials)
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