Special Issue "Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Pharmacy, Food and Nutrition"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Bruno Tirillini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino, 61029 Urbino, Italy
Interests: phytochemistry; pharmaceutical botany

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is with great pleasure that I introduce you to a new Special Issue of Applied Sciences, Section: Food Science and Technology, which is dedicated to medicinal and aromatic plants—in particular, to their use in foods. This Special Issue is titled “Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Pharmacy, Food and Nutrition”

 Traditionally medicinal plants are plants that have healing powers and aromatic plants that are used in various product sectors for the volatile components contained in them. This "didactic" distinction no longer exists today; medicinal plants can be used as aromatic plants and vice versa. In this new era of the study of traditional plants, the scientific approach is to study each plant as an entity regardless of traditional classifications and to try to understand what its biological activities are through its phytocomplex.

In this perspective, we would like to collect scientific work dealing with plants that can be used as food or supplements highlighting their biological as well as nutritional activities.

Given the great field of action of medicinal and aromatic plants, including fungi, this Issue aims to focus on knowledge of the biological and nutritional activities of plants that can be used in human nutrition.

All papers dealing with biological and pharmacological activities, product chemistry, analytical studies, and biochemical investigations are welcome. Manuscripts dealing with formulation and delivery systems of medicinal and aromatic plants will also be considered.

Dr. Bruno Tirillini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aromatic plant
  • food
  • analytical
  • biological activities
  • biochemical activities
  • pharmacological activities
  • phytochemistry
  • Medicinal

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Volatile Organic Compounds of the Glandular Trichomes of Ocimum basilicum and Artifacts during the Distillation of the Leaves
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(16), 7312; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11167312 - 09 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Focusing on volatile organic compounds (VOC) of Ocimum basilicum, this study aims to determine the chemical composition of VOC in secretory trichomes and compare it with that of essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of leaves. The technique of extracting the content of [...] Read more.
Focusing on volatile organic compounds (VOC) of Ocimum basilicum, this study aims to determine the chemical composition of VOC in secretory trichomes and compare it with that of essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of leaves. The technique of extracting the content of glandular trichomes refers to the microneedle shuttle analysis. Hydrodistillation of fresh leaves was done with a Clevenger distiller (EO). The chemical compositions were determined by GC/FID and GC/MS. The head of the capitate trichomes does not contain volatile compounds. Fifty volatile compounds were detected in the EO, and twenty-four volatile compounds were detected in the VOC; the main components were eugenol (from 15.47 ± 1.05% to 41.89 ± 2.83%) and linalool (from 32.05 ± 2.57% to 28.99 ± 2.32%), respectively. During the distillation of the basil leaves 26 artifacts are formed. The composition of the essential oil of O. basilicum therefore depends not only on the plant but also on the method used to obtain it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Pharmacy, Food and Nutrition)
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Article
Antioxidant and Understanding the Anticancer Properties in Human Prostate and Breast Cancer Cell Lines of Chemically Characterized Methanol Extract from Berberis hispanica Boiss. & Reut
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 3510; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11083510 - 14 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 526
Abstract
The current research was conducted to investigate the chemical profile, antiproliferative, and antioxidant activities of methanol extracts obtained by two different methods including maceration and Soxhlet from Berberis hispanica Boiss. & Reut. Antiproliferative activities were evaluated by the MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) [...] Read more.
The current research was conducted to investigate the chemical profile, antiproliferative, and antioxidant activities of methanol extracts obtained by two different methods including maceration and Soxhlet from Berberis hispanica Boiss. & Reut. Antiproliferative activities were evaluated by the MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay in four human cancer cell lines including prostate (LnCap and 22 RV1) and breast cancer (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). The antioxidant power was evaluated by DPPH ((2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-hydrate), ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), and FRAPS (Ferric reducing antioxidant power) tests. The chemical composition was conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after methylation. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were assessed using the Folin–Ciocalteu method. The phytochemical analysis showed that the tested extracts possessed inserting potentially active compounds. The MTT test revealed that both extracts (maceration and Soxhlet) reduced cell viability in all cell lines tested. In breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, the IC50 values obtained by maceration were 16.55 ± 0.58 and 17.95 ± 0.58 µg/mL, respectively. These values were slightly lower than those obtained with the Soxhlet extract toward MDA-MB-231 (19.93 ± 0.74 µg/mL) and MCF-7 (20.22 ± 0.89 µg/mL). Regarding prostate cancer cells 22 RV and LnCap, the IC50 values obtained by maceration extract (22 RV: 11.75 ± 0.35 µg/mL; LnCap: 11.91 ± 0.54 µg/mL) were also slightly lower than those obtained with Soxhlet (22 RV: 13.47 ± 0.52 µg/mL; LnCap: 19.64 ± 1.05 µg/mL). The antioxidant activity showed that the studied extracts had considerable antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP, and ABTS) with particular attention to the extract obtained with maceration. The Berberis hispanica Bois. and Reut. can serve society as it provides potentially bioactive compounds that may find application in the medical sector to control such diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Pharmacy, Food and Nutrition)
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Article
Thymoquinone, the Most Prominent Constituent of Nigella Sativa, Attenuates Liver Damage in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats via Regulation of Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Cyclooxygenase-2 Protein Expression
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 3223; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11073223 - 03 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 560
Abstract
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifaceted metabolic disorder that results in dysfunction and failure of various organs. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of Thymoquinone (TQ), on antidiabetic, oxidative stress, and anti-inflammatory activities in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced (55 mg/kg b.w) diabetic rats. [...] Read more.
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifaceted metabolic disorder that results in dysfunction and failure of various organs. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of Thymoquinone (TQ), on antidiabetic, oxidative stress, and anti-inflammatory activities in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced (55 mg/kg b.w) diabetic rats. TQ was orally given for 8 consecutive weeks at dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. The blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, liver function enzymes, high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels were measured accordingly in control, diabetes control (DC), and TQ-treatment groups. These experiments confirmed that TQ conserves the insulin level (0.4 ng/mL vs. 0.23 ng/mL), fasting blood glucose (146 ± 7 mg/dL vs. 225 ± 5 mg/dL), and HbA1c (7.5% vs. 10.6%) quite considerably as compared to DC animals. Our results also confirmed that TQ treatment conserves the body weight and lipid profile significantly in STZ-treated animals as compared to the DC group. Moreover, the antioxidant enzymes (GSH, SOD, GST, and CAT) levels decreased, liver function enzymes (ALT, AST, and ALP), lipid peroxidation and inflammatory markers (TNF-α, CRP, IL-1β, IL-6) increased by STZ treatment, that is significantly restored after TQ treatment. As compared to untreated animals, TQ restored the hepatocytes architectural changes and collagen fibers and cox-2 protein expression in liver tissues as evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s trichrome, and immunohistochemistry staining. Taken together, all these findings indicated that TQ ameliorates glucose level and lipid metabolism. It restores liver function, antioxidant enzymes, anti-inflammatory markers, and maintains hepatocytes architecture in STZ-induced diabetes mellitus rats. Here, in this study, we have demonstrated for the first time the role of TQ in the reduction of the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and fibrosis formation in diabetic rats. Based on the findings, the study suggests that TQ is a novel natural drug with a wide range of clinical applications including the management of diabetes mellitus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Pharmacy, Food and Nutrition)
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Review

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Review
A Review on Potential Antimutagenic Plants of Saudi Arabia
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(18), 8494; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188494 - 13 Sep 2021
Viewed by 301
Abstract
Mutagenic complications can cause disease in both present as well as future generations. The disorders are caused by exogenous and endogenous agents that damage DNA beyond the normal repair mechanism. Rapid industrialization and the population explosion have contributed immensely to changes in the [...] Read more.
Mutagenic complications can cause disease in both present as well as future generations. The disorders are caused by exogenous and endogenous agents that damage DNA beyond the normal repair mechanism. Rapid industrialization and the population explosion have contributed immensely to changes in the environment, leading to unavoidable exposure to mutagens in our daily life. As it is impossible to prevent exposure, one of the better approaches is to increase the intake of anti-mutagenic substances derived from natural resources. This review summarizes some of the important plants in Saudi Arabia that might have the potential to exhibit anti-mutagenic activity. The data for the review were retrieved from Google scholar, NCBI, PUBMED, EMBASE and the Web of Science. The information in the study has importance since one of the major reasons for mutation is viral infection. Considering the pandemic situation due to novel coronavirus and its aftermath, the native plants of Saudi Arabia could become an important source for reducing mutagenic complications associated with exogenous agents, including viruses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Pharmacy, Food and Nutrition)
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