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Aquatic Nutrition and Products Processing

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 6352

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Agri-Food, Environmental, and Animal Sciences, University of Udine, Udine, Italy
Interests: innovation in aquaculture; Salmo trutta; trout; Salmonidae; fish meal; diet; hepatosomatic index; genotype; best linear unbiased prediction; breeding value
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aquatic product processing industry is becoming more and more popular and attracting increasing attention in the fish industry. So-called “processing works, circulation works, production works” invigorate processing, helping goods to flow freely, which opens up a permanent high-speed channel for aquaculture production. Therefore, the development of the aquatic product processing industry plays the role of a bridge for the development of fisheries. It is not only important in accelerating the development of modern fisheries, however, but also represents an effective way to optimize fishery structure and realize the value added and efficiency of the industry.

For this Special Issue, I would like to invite researchers in the field to contribute their original and excellent reviews, articles, reports, etc. I look forward to reading your works.

Dr. Edo D'AGARO
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • novel fish feed ingredients (insects, algae, etc.)
  • precision fish feeding and farming
  • life cycle
  • assesments of fish feed and farming
  • nutrigenetics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 573 KiB  
Article
Fishmeal Replacement with Animal Protein Source (Crocodylus niloticus Meat Meal) in Diets of Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) of Different Size Groups
by Rendani Winnie Luthada-Raswiswi, Gordon O’Brien and Samson Mukaratirwa
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(14), 7211; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12147211 - 18 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1779
Abstract
Fish are generally known to change their nutritional requirements depending on their life stage and formulating feeds for different size groups to meet their dietary needs is essential. This study aimed to assess the potential of Crocodylus niloticus meat meal as an animal [...] Read more.
Fish are generally known to change their nutritional requirements depending on their life stage and formulating feeds for different size groups to meet their dietary needs is essential. This study aimed to assess the potential of Crocodylus niloticus meat meal as an animal protein source replacing fishmeal in Oreochromis mossambicus diets. Ten fry (0.07 g fish−1) were randomly assigned to three formulated diets (0% (D1), 50% (D2), and 100% (D3)), and each diet had three replicates. The fry were fed 10% body weight per day (BWd−1) for 30 days. New diets (0% (D4), 50% (D5), and 100% (D6)) were introduced, and the feeding rate was reduced to 5% BWd−1 for 48 days. After that, the fish were fed 2% BWd−1 for 78 days, the same diets used for fingerlings. All size groups were fed two portions of their daily ration at 10:30 h and 15:30 h. Our results point to the suggestion that Crocodylus niloticus meat meal may replace fishmeal for Oreochromis mossambicus, as there were no significant differences in weight gain (G), specific growth rates (SGR), gross feed conversion ratios (GFCR), or protein efficiency ratios (PER) for fry fed different diets. Furthermore, there were similarities in Gs, SGRs, GFCRs, and PER in fingerlings and sub adult to adult fish fed D4 and D5. The cost analysis of ingredients used in diets with 50% and 100% Crocodylus niloticus meat meal indicated that it was profitable to use this meat meal in diets of O. mossambicus of all groups. The profit index of 0.3 for fry, 0.8 for fingerlings, and 1.9 for subadults to adults for 100% fishmeal diets were lower than 0.4 and 0.5 for fry, 0.9 and 1.1 for fingerlings, and 2.3 and 2.9 for sub adult to adult fish fed diets with 50% and 100% crocodile meat meal, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Nutrition and Products Processing)
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11 pages, 2074 KiB  
Article
Optimizing the Processing of Shellfish (Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus Hybrid) Biomass Cultivated in the Low Salinity Region of the Baltic Sea for the Extraction of Meat and Proteins
by Indrek Adler, Jonne Kotta, Rando Tuvikene and Katrin Kaldre
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(10), 5163; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12105163 - 20 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1703
Abstract
Mussel farming is a novel and growing aquaculture field in the Baltic Sea. Nevertheless, there is very little published evidence on the processing of shellfish biomass in the region. The aim of this study is to develop a methodology for the extraction of [...] Read more.
Mussel farming is a novel and growing aquaculture field in the Baltic Sea. Nevertheless, there is very little published evidence on the processing of shellfish biomass in the region. The aim of this study is to develop a methodology for the extraction of organic-rich fractions from small-sized blue mussels of the Baltic Sea region that is applicable and economically viable for the feed and food industry. The efficiency of mussel meat separation was evaluated using different processing, drying, and filtration techniques. The laboratory experiments have succeeded in finding a method that is operationally feasible and does not require overly complex and expensive laboratory settings. These trials also showed that the separation of meat from fresh or frozen mussels can be achieved by simple crushing and sedimentation methods and the extraction yielded a significant amount of mussel meat (7.6%) with a high protein content (3.2%, i.e., half of the total protein found in the used mussel-mass). It also appeared that the use of filtration is not practical because the protein loss was extremely high. In addition, filtration makes the process of dry-matter separation more complex, and costs are unlikely to be compensated by the energy saved in drying. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Nutrition and Products Processing)
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Review

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15 pages, 3813 KiB  
Review
Genetic and Phenotypic Characteristics of the Salmo trutta Complex in Italy
by Edo D’Agaro, PierPaolo Gibertoni, Fabio Marroni, Maria Messina, Emilio Tibaldi and Stefano Esposito
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(7), 3219; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12073219 - 22 Mar 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2178
Abstract
Salmonid fish have become ecological and research models of study in the field of conservation genetics and genomics. Over the last decade, brown trout have received a high level of interest in research and publications. The term Salmo trutta complex is used to [...] Read more.
Salmonid fish have become ecological and research models of study in the field of conservation genetics and genomics. Over the last decade, brown trout have received a high level of interest in research and publications. The term Salmo trutta complex is used to indicate the large number of geographic forms present in the species Salmo trutta. In Europe, the S. trutta complex consists (based on mitochondrial DNA control region analysis) of seven major evolutionary lineages: Atlantic (AT), Mediterranean (ME), Adriatic (AD), Danubian (DA), Marmoratus (MA), Duero (DU) and Tigris (TI). In several nations, the difficulty of identifying some lineages derives from their wide phenotypic and geographic plasticity and the presence of mixed lineages (due to introgressive hybridization with domestic AT populations). In Italy, the S. trutta complex populations living in the Tyrrhenian area and on the main islands (Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica) showed high genetic diversity. Currently, on the Italian Red List, the protected (near threatened) populations are the AD and ME lineages. Recent studies based on traditional (mitochondrial and nuclear markers) and NGS (next-generation sequencing) analyses have clarified some genetic differences between the populations of the Tyrrhenian region, Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica. Native populations in Sardinia belong to the AD lineage, while those living in Corsica are mainly characterized by the AD, MA and ME haplotypes. In Sicily, in the area of the Iblei mountains, an AT lineage (North African) exists. According to some authors, the term Salmo macrostigma should only be used for populations in North Africa. The use of genotyping methods based on mtDNA and nuclear markers and the latest generation sequencing techniques can improve the study of populations and evolutionary lineages in areas where there are overlaps and hybridization phenomena. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Nutrition and Products Processing)
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