Special Issue "Recent Advances and Applications of Infrared Thermography"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Evangelos Z. Kordatos

Department of Engineering and Mathematics, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: infrared thermography; non-destructive methodologies; real-time monitoring; structural health monitoring; acoustic emission; ultrasounds; fracture behavior; composite materials; advanced materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Infrared thermography (IRT), as a non-destructive evaluation method, has been applied for the last five decades with great success in a broad spectrum of disciplines. Due to the continuous advances in sensor technology and electronics, IRT has evolved into a major, accurate, versatile, and well-established method for various applications. It has been employed in engineering, biomedicine, nuclear technology, physics, veterinary science, arts, cultural heritage, etc. Defect detection, thermal performance of buildings, monitoring of damage, diagnosis of medical conditions, art authenticity evaluation, assessment of culture heritage conditions, and many other applications have led the scientific community to develop and advance numerous methodologies based on infrared thermography, such as pulsed phase, lock-in, step, ultrasound, eddy current, thermo-electrical lock-in thermography, etc.     This Special Issue of Applied Sciences focuses on the recent advances and applications of infrared thermography in a variety of disciplines. The aim of this issue is to attract research involving novel and advanced IRT methodologies or/and new applications that have an impact on the scientific community. Manuscripts that combine IRT with other non-destructive methodologies, as long as IRT is the main method, are also welcome.  

Dr. Evangelos Z. Kordatos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Infrared thermography
  • Non-destructive evaluation
  • Structural health monitoring
  • Sensors
  • Damage monitoring
  • Advanced image processing
  • Defect detection
  • Thermographic numerical simulations

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Ultrasonic Tomographic Technique and Its Applications
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(5), 1005; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9051005
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 16 February 2019 / Accepted: 22 February 2019 / Published: 11 March 2019
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Abstract
X-ray tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent techniques for non-destructive or non-invasive inspections, however, they have shotcomings including the expensive cost in both the devices themselves and their protection facilities, the harmful side effects of the X-rays to human bodies and [...] Read more.
X-ray tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent techniques for non-destructive or non-invasive inspections, however, they have shotcomings including the expensive cost in both the devices themselves and their protection facilities, the harmful side effects of the X-rays to human bodies and to the environment. In view of this argument, it is necessary to develop new, inexpensive, safe and reliable tomographic techniques, especially in medical imaging and non-destructive inspections. There are new tomographic techniques under development such as optical tomography, photo-acoustic tomography, ultrasonic tomography and so on, from which we take ultrasonic tomography as the topic in this paper. We introduce a review of the known ultrasonic tomographic techniques and discuss their future development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Applications of Infrared Thermography)
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Open AccessArticle
New Insights in Potato Leaf Freezing by Infrared Thermography
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(5), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9050819
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 18 February 2019 / Accepted: 21 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
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Abstract
Infrared thermography has been widely used to study freezing processes in freezing resistant plants but hardly in freezing susceptible species. Solanum tuberosum leaves get frost killed at −3 °C and are unable to frost harden. The basic nature of frost injury to potato [...] Read more.
Infrared thermography has been widely used to study freezing processes in freezing resistant plants but hardly in freezing susceptible species. Solanum tuberosum leaves get frost killed at −3 °C and are unable to frost harden. The basic nature of frost injury to potato leaves is not clear. By employment of infrared differential thermal analysis (IDTA) in combination with viability assessment, we aimed to clarify the mechanistic relationship between ice formation and frost injury. During controlled freezing of potato leaves two distinct freezing events were detected by IDTA. During the first freezing event, the ice wave propagated via the xylem and spread out within 60 s throughout the whole leaf. When leaves were rewarmed after this freezing event, they did not show any frost injury symptoms. We suggest that this non-lethal first ice wave is restricted to the extracellular space. When leaves remained exposed after this exotherm, a second freezing event with a diffuse freezing pattern without a distinct starting point was recorded. When thawed after this second freezing event, leaves always showed frost damage suggesting intracellular freezing. The freezing behavior of potato leaves and its relation to frost damage corroborates that control of ice nucleation is a key for frost protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Applications of Infrared Thermography)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Matched-Filter Thermography
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 581; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040581
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 26 March 2018 / Accepted: 4 April 2018 / Published: 8 April 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (23274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Conventional infrared thermography techniques, including pulsed and lock-in thermography, have shown great potential for non-destructive evaluation of broad spectrum of materials, spanning from metals to polymers to biological tissues. However, performance of these techniques is often limited due to the diffuse nature of [...] Read more.
Conventional infrared thermography techniques, including pulsed and lock-in thermography, have shown great potential for non-destructive evaluation of broad spectrum of materials, spanning from metals to polymers to biological tissues. However, performance of these techniques is often limited due to the diffuse nature of thermal wave fields, resulting in an inherent compromise between inspection depth and depth resolution. Recently, matched-filter thermography has been introduced as a means for overcoming this classic limitation to enable depth-resolved subsurface thermal imaging and improving axial/depth resolution. This paper reviews the basic principles and experimental results of matched-filter thermography: first, mathematical and signal processing concepts related to matched-fileting and pulse compression are discussed. Next, theoretical modeling of thermal-wave responses to matched-filter thermography using two categories of pulse compression techniques (linear frequency modulation and binary phase coding) are reviewed. Key experimental results from literature demonstrating the maintenance of axial resolution while inspecting deep into opaque and turbid media are also presented and discussed. Finally, the concept of thermal coherence tomography for deconvolution of thermal responses of axially superposed sources and creation of depth-selective images in a diffusion-wave field is reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Applications of Infrared Thermography)
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