Special Issue "Antioxidants in Cosmetics"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Industrial Applications of Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yong Chool Boo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, 680 Gukchaebosang‐ro, Jung‐gu, Daegu 41944, Korea

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The outermost skin of our body performs a sensory and defensive role as the interface with the external environment. In addition, skin is a very special organ that expresses our external beauty. Modern cosmetics are moving away from the simple role of maintaining the external beauty of the skin and increasing their role in promoting the health of the skin. External factors, such as ultraviolet rays, climate change, and air pollutants, increase the oxidative damage of the skin. Inner factors, such as aging, nutritional imbalance, hormonal changes, and stress, weaken the antioxidant function of the skin. Therefore, not only antioxidants that can prevent oxidative damage inside and outside of the skin, but also components that can enhance the antioxidant function of the skin itself have potential value as new cosmetic materials. Of course, some antioxidants may act as prooxidants in certain cases and harm the skin. Antioxidants can also affect cell signaling and prevent or conversely aggravate skin aging and cancer. Therefore, scientific research on the positive and negative effects of natural or synthetic antioxidants in skin, application of excellent antioxidants to cosmetic formulations, and objectively evaluating the clinical efficacy of such cosmetics have great industrial and medical importance.

We invite you to submit the latest research and review article on the positive and negative effects of natural or synthetic antioxidants on skin and skin cells, and their cosmetic applications, to this Special issue. We welcome cell, animal, and clinical studies on antioxidants or antioxidant enhancers in various experimental models that may cause oxidative damage or in other relevant experimental settings. The invited studies also include research into stabilizing antioxidants in cosmetic formulations and antioxidant systems that stabilize functional ingredients in cosmetics. We expect that antioxidant research in the field of skin and cosmetics will make a great scientific leap forward, and information which is useful not only for cosmetic scientists but also for cosmetic consumers will be derived through this Special issue.

Prof. Dr. Yong Chool Boo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Penta-1,2,3,4,6-O-Galloyl-β-d-Glucose Inhibits UVB-Induced Photoaging by Targeting PAK1 and JNK1
Antioxidants 2019, 8(11), 561; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8110561 - 15 Nov 2019
Abstract
Penta-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose (PGG) is a gallotannin polyphenolic compound that occurs naturally in fermented Rhus verniciflua. The present study aimed to examine the effect of PGG on UVB-induced skin aging and its molecular mechanisms in HaCaT human keratinocytes and SKH-1 [...] Read more.
Penta-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose (PGG) is a gallotannin polyphenolic compound that occurs naturally in fermented Rhus verniciflua. The present study aimed to examine the effect of PGG on UVB-induced skin aging and its molecular mechanisms in HaCaT human keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice models. PGG suppressed UVB-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting phosphorylation of RAF/MEK/ERK, MKK3/6/p38, and c-Jun. UVB-induced ERK and p38 signaling pathways that induce the MMP-1 expression were mediated by PAK1 in HaCaT cells. PGG suppressed PAK1 and JNK1 kinase activities, and directly bound both PAK1 in an ATP-competitive manner and JNK1 in an ATP-noncompetitive manner. Consistently, PGG decreased UVB-induced wrinkle formation, epidermal thickness, type 1 collagen and MMP-13 expression in mouse skin. Overall, these results indicate that PGG exhibits anti-photoaging effects in vitro and in vivo by the suppression of PAK1 and JNK1 kinase activities, and may be useful for the prevention of skin aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Cosmetics)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Flavonoid-Enriched Plant-Extract-Loaded Emulsion: A Novel Phytocosmetic Sunscreen Formulation with Antioxidant Properties
Antioxidants 2019, 8(10), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8100443 - 01 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The aim of this study was to develop a phytocosmetic sunscreen emulsion with antioxidant effect, containing a blend of flavonoid-enriched plant extracts. In vitro sun protection factor, antioxidant activity, skin irritation, photostability, cutaneous permeation, and retention of flavonoids were evaluated. Thermodynamically stable emulsions [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to develop a phytocosmetic sunscreen emulsion with antioxidant effect, containing a blend of flavonoid-enriched plant extracts. In vitro sun protection factor, antioxidant activity, skin irritation, photostability, cutaneous permeation, and retention of flavonoids were evaluated. Thermodynamically stable emulsions were obtained and tested for sensorial analysis after loading the blend of extracts. The selected emulsion was stable when stored at low temperatures (5 °C), for which after 120 days the concentration of quercetin and rutin were above their limit of quantification, i.e., 2.8 ± 0.39 μg/mL and 30.39 ± 0.39 μg/mL, respectively. Spreadability, low rupture strength and adhesiveness were shown to be similar to a conventional topical product. Higher brittleness, pseudo-plastic, and viscoelastic behaviors were also recorded for the developed phytocosmetic sunscreen. The product presented a critical wavelength of 387.0 nm and ultraviolet rays A and B (UVA/UVB) rate of 0.78, confirming that the developed formulation shows capacity for UVA/UVB protection, protecting skin against damages caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Rutin was shown to permeate the skin barrier and was also quantified in the stratum corneum (3.27 ± 1.92 μg/mL) by tape stripping and retention test (114.68 ± 8.70 μg/mL). The developed flavonoid-enriched phytocosmetic was shown to be non-irritant to skin by an in vitro assay. Our results confirm the antioxidant activity, sun protection, and physical properties of the developed phytocosmetic for topical application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Cosmetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Marine Alga Ecklonia cava Extract and Dieckol Attenuate Prostaglandin E2 Production in HaCaT Keratinocytes Exposed to Airborne Particulate Matter
Antioxidants 2019, 8(6), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8060190 - 21 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is an important cause of skin damage, and an increasing number of studies have been conducted to discover safe, natural materials that can alleviate the oxidative stress and inflammation caused by PM. It has been previously shown that the [...] Read more.
Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is an important cause of skin damage, and an increasing number of studies have been conducted to discover safe, natural materials that can alleviate the oxidative stress and inflammation caused by PM. It has been previously shown that the extract of Ecklonia cava Kjellman, a perennial brown macroalga, can alleviate oxidative stress in epidermal keratinocytes exposed to PM less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10). The present study was undertaken to further examine the anti-inflammatory effects of E. cava extract and its major polyphenolic constituent, dieckol. HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to PM10 in the presence or absence of E. cava extract or dieckol and analyzed for their viability, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release, and gene expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES)-1, mPGES-2, and cytosolic prostaglandin E2 synthase (cPGES). PM10 treatment decreased cell viability and increased the production of PGE2, and these changes were partially abrogated by E. cava extract. E. cava extract also attenuated the expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-2 stimulated by PM10. Dieckol attenuated PGE2 production and the gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 stimulated by PM10. This study demonstrates that E. cava extract and dieckol alleviate airborne PM10-induced PGE2 production in keratinocytes through the inhibition of gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, mPGES-1, and/or mPGES-2. Thus, E. cava extract and dieckol are potentially useful natural cosmetic ingredients for counteracting the pro-inflammatory effects of airborne PM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Cosmetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Can Plant Phenolic Compounds Protect the Skin from Airborne Particulate Matter?
Antioxidants 2019, 8(9), 379; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090379 - 06 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The skin is directly exposed to the polluted atmospheric environment, and skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and acne vulgaris, can be induced or exacerbated by airborne particulate matter (PM). PM can also promote premature skin aging with its accompanying functional and morphological [...] Read more.
The skin is directly exposed to the polluted atmospheric environment, and skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and acne vulgaris, can be induced or exacerbated by airborne particulate matter (PM). PM can also promote premature skin aging with its accompanying functional and morphological changes. PM-induced skin diseases and premature skin aging are largely mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the harmful effects of PM may be ameliorated by safe and effective natural antioxidants. Experimental studies have shown that the extracts and phenolic compounds derived from many plants, such as cocoa, green tea, grape, pomegranate, and some marine algae, have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on PM-exposed cells. The phenolic compounds can decrease the levels of ROS in cells and/or enhance cellular antioxidant capacity and, thereby, can attenuate PM-induced oxidative damage to nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. They also lower the levels of cytokines, chemokines, cell adhesion molecules, prostaglandins, and matrix metalloproteinases implicated in cellular inflammatory responses to PM. Although there is still much research to be done, current studies in this field suggest that plant-derived phenolic compounds may have a protective effect on skin exposed to high levels of air pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Cosmetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Human Skin Lightening Efficacy of Resveratrol and Its Analogs: From in Vitro Studies to Cosmetic Applications
Antioxidants 2019, 8(9), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090332 - 22 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Antioxidants are deemed useful in controlling oxidative stress associated with extrinsic skin aging and pigmentation disorders. Resveratrol is a polyphenol compound found in many edible plants such as Vitis vinifera, and its inhibitory effects on the catalytic activity, gene expression, and posttranslational [...] Read more.
Antioxidants are deemed useful in controlling oxidative stress associated with extrinsic skin aging and pigmentation disorders. Resveratrol is a polyphenol compound found in many edible plants such as Vitis vinifera, and its inhibitory effects on the catalytic activity, gene expression, and posttranslational modifications of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the melanin biosynthetic pathway, provide a mechanistic basis for its antimelanogenic effects seen in melanocytic cells, three-dimensionally reconstituted skin models, and in vivo animal models. As a potent antioxidant and a modulator of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and sirtuin 1, resveratrol can also regulate multiple signaling pathways associated with inflammation and premature aging. Recent clinical studies have supported the efficacy of resveratrol and its analogs, such as resveratryl triacetate (RTA) and resveratryl triglycolate (RTG), in human skin lightening and antiaging. These findings suggest that resveratrol and its analogs are potentially useful as skin lightening and antiaging agents in cosmetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Cosmetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
p-Coumaric Acid as An Active Ingredient in Cosmetics: A Review Focusing on its Antimelanogenic Effects
Antioxidants 2019, 8(8), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8080275 - 04 Aug 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Controlling unwanted hyperpigmentation is a major challenge in dermatology and cosmetology, and safe and efficacious antimelanogenic agents are deemed useful for this purpose. p-Coumaric acid is a natural metabolite contained in many edible plants, and its antioxidant activities in reducing oxidative stress [...] Read more.
Controlling unwanted hyperpigmentation is a major challenge in dermatology and cosmetology, and safe and efficacious antimelanogenic agents are deemed useful for this purpose. p-Coumaric acid is a natural metabolite contained in many edible plants, and its antioxidant activities in reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions have been demonstrated in various experimental models. p-Coumaric acid has the optimal structure to be a competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase that catalyzes key reactions in the melanin biosynthetic pathway. Experimental evidence supports this notion as it was found to be a more potent inhibitor of tyrosinase, especially toward human enzymes, than other well-known tyrosinase inhibitors such as arbutin and kojic acid. p-Coumaric acid inhibited melanin synthesis in murine melanoma cells, human epidermal melanocytes, and reconstituted three-dimensional human skin models. Ex-vivo skin permeation experiments and in-vivo efficacy tests for p-coumaric acid confirmed its efficient transdermal delivery and functional efficacy in reducing erythema development and skin pigmentation due to ultraviolet radiation exposure. Human studies further supported its effectiveness in hypopigmentation and depigmentation. These findings suggest that p-coumaric acid has good potential to be used as a skin-lightening active ingredient in cosmetics. Future studies are needed to extensively examine its safety and efficacy and to develop an optimized cosmetic formulation for the best performance in skin lightening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Cosmetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop