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Open AccessReview

Human Skin Lightening Efficacy of Resveratrol and Its Analogs: From in Vitro Studies to Cosmetic Applications

by 1,2,3,4
1
Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41944, Korea
2
Brain Korea (BK) 21 Plus Kyungpook National University (KNU) Biomedical Convergence Program, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41944, Korea
3
Cell and Matrix Research Institute, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41944, Korea
4
Ruby Crown Co., Ltd., Daegu 41061, Korea
Antioxidants 2019, 8(9), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090332
Received: 28 July 2019 / Revised: 14 August 2019 / Accepted: 20 August 2019 / Published: 22 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Cosmetics)
Antioxidants are deemed useful in controlling oxidative stress associated with extrinsic skin aging and pigmentation disorders. Resveratrol is a polyphenol compound found in many edible plants such as Vitis vinifera, and its inhibitory effects on the catalytic activity, gene expression, and posttranslational modifications of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the melanin biosynthetic pathway, provide a mechanistic basis for its antimelanogenic effects seen in melanocytic cells, three-dimensionally reconstituted skin models, and in vivo animal models. As a potent antioxidant and a modulator of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and sirtuin 1, resveratrol can also regulate multiple signaling pathways associated with inflammation and premature aging. Recent clinical studies have supported the efficacy of resveratrol and its analogs, such as resveratryl triacetate (RTA) and resveratryl triglycolate (RTG), in human skin lightening and antiaging. These findings suggest that resveratrol and its analogs are potentially useful as skin lightening and antiaging agents in cosmetics. View Full-Text
Keywords: resveratrol; cosmetics; skin lightening; melanin; hypopigmentation; dietary antioxidants; oxidative stress; depigmenting agent; skin aging; phytochemical resveratrol; cosmetics; skin lightening; melanin; hypopigmentation; dietary antioxidants; oxidative stress; depigmenting agent; skin aging; phytochemical
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MDPI and ACS Style

Boo, Y.C. Human Skin Lightening Efficacy of Resveratrol and Its Analogs: From in Vitro Studies to Cosmetic Applications. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 332. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090332

AMA Style

Boo YC. Human Skin Lightening Efficacy of Resveratrol and Its Analogs: From in Vitro Studies to Cosmetic Applications. Antioxidants. 2019; 8(9):332. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090332

Chicago/Turabian Style

Boo, Yong C. 2019. "Human Skin Lightening Efficacy of Resveratrol and Its Analogs: From in Vitro Studies to Cosmetic Applications" Antioxidants 8, no. 9: 332. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090332

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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