Genomic Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance and Evolution Mechanism of Bacteria

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 655

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Pathobiology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
2. Antimicrobial Research Unit, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZuluNatal, Durban 4000, South Africa
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; molecular genetics; one-health genomics; pathogenomics; applied bioinformatics; machine learning analytics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
2. Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Venda, Thohoyandou, South Africa
Interests: bacteria epidemiology; molecular surveillance of bacteria; one-health genomics; zoonotic pathogens; human health risk
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the ever-evolving battle against antimicrobial resistance (AMR), our understanding of the genomic landscape of bacteria and their mechanisms of evolution has become pivotal. In bacteria, resistance to antibiotics is determined by genetic factors such as chromosomes, plasmids or other movable genetic elements. Although antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) typically exhibit significant sequence variability, such as the impact of different concentrations of antibiotics on their genomic dynamics, the impact of this diversity on AMR is still unclear. Therefore, understanding the dynamic changes and mobilization of antibiotic resistance genes in humans, animals, plants and environmental microorganisms through genomics and metagenomics methods is crucial.

This Special Issue seeks to foster a comprehensive understanding of the genetic underpinnings of bacterial antimicrobial resistance and the evolutionary dynamics that underlie these adaptations.

Dr. Daniel Gyamfi Amoako
Dr. Linda Bester
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance mechanism
  • mobile genetic element
  • horizontal gene transfer
  • resistome
  • evolution
  • molecular phylogenetics
  • genomics
  • bioinformatics analysis
  • next-generation sequencing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 2320 KiB  
Article
Genomic Epidemiology of C2/H30Rx and C1-M27 Subclades of Escherichia coli ST131 Isolates from Clinical Blood Samples in Hungary
by Kinga Tóth, Ivelina Damjanova, Levente Laczkó, Lilla Buzgó, Virág Lesinszki, Erika Ungvári, Laura Jánvári, Adrienn Hanczvikkel, Ákos Tóth and Dóra Szabó
Antibiotics 2024, 13(4), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13040363 - 16 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli ST131 has become widespread worldwide. This study aims to characterize the virulome, resistome, and population structure of E. coli ST131 isolates from clinical blood samples in Hungary. A total of 30 C2/H30Rx and 33 C1-M27 ST131 isolates were selected [...] Read more.
Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli ST131 has become widespread worldwide. This study aims to characterize the virulome, resistome, and population structure of E. coli ST131 isolates from clinical blood samples in Hungary. A total of 30 C2/H30Rx and 33 C1-M27 ST131 isolates were selected for Illumina MiSeq sequencing and 30 isolates for MinION sequencing, followed by hybrid de novo assembly. Five C2/H30Rx and one C1-M27 cluster were identified. C1-M27 isolates harbored the F1:A2:B20 plasmid in 93.9% of cases. Long-read sequencing revealed that blaCTX-M-27 was on plasmids. Among the C2/H30Rx isolates, only six isolates carried the C2-associated F2:A1:B- plasmid type. Of 19 hybrid-assembled C2/H30Rx genomes, the blaCTX-M-15 gene was located on plasmid only in one isolate, while in the other isolates, ISEcp1 or IS26-mediated chromosomal integration of blaCTX-M-15 was detected in unique variations. In one isolate a part of F2:A1:B- plasmid integrated into the chromosome. These results suggest that CTX-M-15-producing C2/H30Rx and CTX-M-27-producing C1-M27 subclades may have emerged and spread in different ways in Hungary. While blaCTX-M-27 was carried mainly on the C1/H30R-associated F1:A2:B20 plasmid, the IncF-like plasmids of C2/H30Rx or its composite transposons have been incorporated into the chromosome through convergent evolutionary processes. Full article
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