Special Issue "Companion animals welfare and behaviour"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Companion Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Caroline Audrey Kerr
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Veterinary Science, the University of Queensland
Interests: pig stress;shelter medicine;animal welfare and behaviour.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to announce a Special Issue of Animals on “Companion Animals’ Welfare and Behaviour”, devoted to new research in this exciting field. Historically, animal welfare has been defined by medical health and even just measuring survival status (e.g., in shelters). Increasingly, it has become recognised how important behavioural attributes significantly impact an animal’s well-being. This Special Issue is focused on understanding companion animal behavioural impact on their welfare status. This is a fairly broad topic that encompasses animals living in domestic homes through to those in animal shelters across all manners of companion animals. The aim of this Special Issue is therefore to collate a body of work in the area of companion animal behaviour and its relationship with welfare to demonstrate both current status and future directions.

We would like to invite original manuscripts that address any aspects associated with the relationship between welfare and behaviour in companion animal species for this Special Issue. Topics of particular interest include defining welfare status in companion animals, links between behavioural disorders in pets and well-being, conversely, the effect of poor welfare status on behaviour, both long- and short-term interventions, such as enhancing environmental attributes, which enhance welfare (e.g., in shelters), and the long-term effect of admission to animal shelter on behaviour in the adopted home. Additional topics may include companion animal training techniques and their impact on an animal’s welfare. 

Dr. Caroline Audrey Kerr
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • welfare
  • well-being
  • behaviour
  • shelter
  • companion animals
  • training
  • health

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Other

Commentary
Dog Welfare, Well-Being and Behavior: Considerations for Selection, Evaluation and Suitability for Animal-Assisted Therapy
Animals 2020, 10(11), 2188; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10112188 - 23 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3588
Abstract
Health care and human service providers may include dogs in formal intervention settings to positively impact human physical, cognitive and psychosocial domains. Dogs working within this context are asked to cope with a multitude of variables including settings, populations, activities, and schedules. In [...] Read more.
Health care and human service providers may include dogs in formal intervention settings to positively impact human physical, cognitive and psychosocial domains. Dogs working within this context are asked to cope with a multitude of variables including settings, populations, activities, and schedules. In this article, the authors highlight how both the preparation and operation of dogs within animal-assisted therapy (AAT) differs from less structured animal-assisted activities (AAA) and more exclusive assistance animal work; the authors highlight the gaps in our knowledge in this regard, and propose an ethically sound framework for pragmatic solutions. This framework also emphasizes the need for good dog welfare to safeguard all participants. If dogs are not properly matched to a job or handler, they may be subjected to unnecessary stress, anxiety, and miscommunication that can lead to disinterest in the work, overt problematic behavioral or health outcomes, or general unsuitability. Such issues can have catastrophic outcomes for the AAT. The authors propose standards for best practices for selection, humane-based preparation and training, and ongoing evaluation to ensure the health, welfare and well-being of dogs working in AAT, which will have concomitant benefits for clients and the professionalism of the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Companion animals welfare and behaviour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop