Special Issue "Recent Advances in Research and Production of Ornamental Plants"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural and Floricultural Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anastasios Darras
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor-Director of Floriculture Laboratory, Department of Agriculture, University of Peloponnese, Kalamata 24100, Greece
Interests: Postharvest Physiology of cut flowers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Global ornamental production has faced serious challenges the past 10 years but still remains dominant within the agricultural sector. Floriculture businesses always seek new, innovative trends and niches that would guide the product sale increases. New and innovative products are always developed via academic research and experimental procedures. In this Special Issue (SI), we aim to record the most recent and novel findings in ornamental production (open field or greenhouse cultivation), propagation, irrigation, fertilization, PGR application, substrate mixtures, plant protection, sustainable and environmental friendly production at low CO2 footprints, postharvest handling and quality. Scientific research data on new species (e.g. endemic, aromatic plants, etc.) with potential ornamental value will provide the prospect of new product development. New ornamental species such as pot plants (ornamental or aromatic), cut flowers or cut foliage would be ideal. Contributions to this SI may focus on, but not be limited to, five major topics: (1) propagation of ornamental plants (e.g. in-vitro, stem cuttings, bulbs, etc), (2) innovative cultivation practices and techniques for cut flower and pot plant production (e.g. irrigation, fertilization, pest and disease management, environmental control, PGR treatments, etc), (3) new ornamental species for exploitation by the floriculture industry (endemic and aromatic plants), (4) sustainable, environmental friendly ornamental production (e.g. cultivation at low CO2 footprints, life cycle assessments, etc), and (5) postharvest handling, quality and trade (e.g. postharvest treatments, packaging, sales, etc).

Dr. Anastasios Darras
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ornamental production
  • Greenhouse cultivation
  • New ornamental species
  • Endemic species
  • Aromatic plants
  • in vitro propagation
  • Stem cuttings
  • Seed plugs
  • Bulbous ornamental plants
  • Herbaceous perennials
  • Woody ornamentals
  • Flowering
  • Plant growth regulators
  • Substrate mixtures
  • Quality and postharvest handling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Changes in Growth and Physiological Parameters of ×Amarine Following an Exogenous Application of Gibberellic Acid and Methyl Jasmonate
Agronomy 2020, 10(7), 980; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10070980 - 08 Jul 2020
Abstract
×Amarine hybrids are attractive ornamental geophytes grown for cut flower production. Their cultivation is limited due to lesser flowering percentages and lesser bulb weight gain. To optimize the growth and propagation of geophytes, plant growth regulators (PGRs) are used, but so far [...] Read more.
×Amarine hybrids are attractive ornamental geophytes grown for cut flower production. Their cultivation is limited due to lesser flowering percentages and lesser bulb weight gain. To optimize the growth and propagation of geophytes, plant growth regulators (PGRs) are used, but so far none have been tested in ×Amarine. We investigated the effect of gibberellic acid (GA3; 50, 100, and 200 mg dm−3) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA; 100, 500, and 1000 µmol dm−3) on growth, flowering, bulb yield, and select physiological parameters of ×A. tubergenii “Zwanenburg”. PGRs were applied as foliar sprays on the 70th and 77th day after planting. GA3 treatment at 200 mg dm−3 exhibited the greatest leaf number, leaf length, bulb weight, daughter bulb number, CO2 assimilation intensity, greenness index, total sugars, and total protein content in bulbs. GA3 application at 100 and 200 mg dm−3 accelerated flowering and at 50 and 100 mg dm−3 significantly increased the bulb flowering percentage. MeJA at all tested concentrations prolonged anthesis time and reduced the bulb flowering percentage. GA3 at all concentrations and MeJA at 500 and 1000 µmol dm−3 stimulated daughter bulbs formation. GA3, especially at 200 mg dm−3 can improve anthesis and increase ×A. tubergenii “Zwanenburg” bulb yield. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Research and Production of Ornamental Plants)
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Open AccessCommunication
Effect of Bead Composition, PVS Type, and Recovery Medium in Cryopreservation of Bleeding Heart ‘Valentine’—Preliminary Study
Agronomy 2020, 10(6), 891; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060891 - 23 Jun 2020
Abstract
Bleeding heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis (L.) Fukuhara) is a valuable ornamental and medicinal perennial. To date, there are few studies focused on cryopreservation of this species, although it could be useful in storage and breeding. This research is aimed at analyzing the effect [...] Read more.
Bleeding heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis (L.) Fukuhara) is a valuable ornamental and medicinal perennial. To date, there are few studies focused on cryopreservation of this species, although it could be useful in storage and breeding. This research is aimed at analyzing the effect of bead composition, type of plant vitrification solution (PVS), and the recovery medium of cryopreservation of bleeding heart. Shoot tips of L. spectabilis ‘Valentine’ were used in the study. The explants were precultured on modified Murashige and Skoog medium (MS; 1962), supplemented with 9% sucrose, 1.0-mg·L−1 kinetin (KIN), and 2.62-mg·L−1 abscisic acid. Next, in the first experiment, the shoot tips were embedded in 3% calcium alginate, based either on an MS medium or distilled sterile water. The produced synseeds were inoculated on the recovery medium with 3.0-mg·L−1 KIN, 0.5-mg·L−1 6-benzyladenine (BA), or cytokinin–free control. Based on the results of the first study, in the second experiment, precultured shoot tips were embedded in 3% calcium alginate based on MS medium and dehydrated with PVS2 or PVS3 for various durations. The pre-treated explants were plunged in liquid nitrogen and, after rewarming, inoculated on the recovery MS medium with 0.5-mg·L−1 BA. PVS3 was more effective in securing the shoot tips than PVS2. The highest recovery level (68.3%) was reported after a 150-min pretreatment with PVS3. Explants from this experimental combination also proliferated the highest number of shoots, as well as those with the greatest length. On the other hand, a higher share of dry weight was found in PVS2-derived shoots (13.5–18.2%) compared with plants produced after PVS3 treatment (10.6–11.4%). The obtained results here can serve as a good basis for further studies related to synthetic seeds and cryopreservation of bleeding heart. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Research and Production of Ornamental Plants)
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Open AccessArticle
Seasonal Functional Partitioning of Carbohydrates and Proline among Plant Parts of the Sand Daffodil
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 539; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040539 - 09 Apr 2020
Abstract
The sand daffodil (Pancratium maritimum) is a perennial geophyte, widely distributed and grown in a wild stage along the Mediterranean seashores. The aboveground tissues of this geophyte are exposed to harsh, ambient conditions and its large inflorescences of remarkable beauty and [...] Read more.
The sand daffodil (Pancratium maritimum) is a perennial geophyte, widely distributed and grown in a wild stage along the Mediterranean seashores. The aboveground tissues of this geophyte are exposed to harsh, ambient conditions and its large inflorescences of remarkable beauty and fragrance expand during the drought season and carry particular ornamental worth. The ecophysiological principles underlining metabolic processes of this geophyte are poorly understood. The seasonal variation of soluble sugars, starch, and proline was investigated in individuals collected from patches of P. maritimum, therefore, monthly measurements were performed in bulbs, leaves, scapes, and petals during a year. It was found that (a) sugar content showed similar seasonal trends between bulbs and leaves, as well as between petals and scapes, (b) bulbs contained enhanced starch concentrations irrespective of season, (c) proline accumulation exhibited substantial seasonal fluctuations among the considered tissues and pronounced differences were detected between maxima in petals and leaves. A substantial increase in both sugar and proline content was evident in petals during the drought season. In leaves, the accumulation of proline and, to a lesser extent, sugars was negatively correlated to the precipitation of the Mediterranean study site. It seems likely that the astonishing flowering of P. maritimum is supported by large leaf and bulb reserves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Research and Production of Ornamental Plants)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Seasonal, functional partitioning of carbohydrates and proline among plant parts of the sand daffodil
Authors: John Pouris; Maria-Sonia Meletiou-Christou; Chrysanthi Chimona;Sophia Rhizopoulou
Affiliation: Section of Botany, Department of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens 15784, Greece
Abstract: The sand daffodil (Pancratium maritimum L) is a perennial geophyte, widely distributed and grown in a wild stage along Mediterranean seashores. The above-ground tissues of this geophyte are exposed to harsh, ambient conditions and its large inflorescences of remarkable beauty and fragrance expand during the dry summer and carry particular ornamental worth. The ecophysiological principles underlining metabolic processes of this geophyte are poorly understood. The seasonal variation of soluble sugars, starch and proline was investigated in individuals collected from field-grown patched of P. maritimum, therefore monthly measurements were performed in bulbs, leaves, spathes and petals during the course of a year. It was found that: (a) sugar content showed similar seasonal trends between bulbs and leaves, as well as between petals and spathes, (b) bulbs contained enhanced concentrations of starch irrespective of season, (c) proline accumulation exhibited substantial seasonal fluctuations among the considered tissues and pronounced differences were detected between maxima in petals and leaves. Concerning the petals, an increase in both sugars and proline was evident during the drought season. In leaves, the accumulation of proline and, to a lesser extent, sugars fluctuate according to the seasonally of the Mediterranean region. It seems likely that flowering of P. maritimum is supported by large leaf and bulb reserves.

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