Special Issue "Scion-Rootstock Interaction in Horticultural Crops: Physiological and Agronomic Implications"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural and Floricultural Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Youssef Rouphael
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, 80055 Portici, Italy
Interests: greenhouse crops; vegetables production; hydroponics and aquaponics; plant nutrition; microgreens; sprouts; edible flowers; functional foods, grafting; microbial and non-microbial biostimulants; biofortification; vegetable quality related to preharvest factors; LED; urban agriculture; organic farming
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Colla
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture and Forest Sciences, University of Tuscia, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: microgreens, sprouts; functional food; crop production; plant nutrition; fertilizers; organic farming; organic agriculture; nutrient management; biofertilizers; vegetable production; fruit quality; fertigation; hydroponics; vegetable crops; biofortification
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Marios Kyriacou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Vegetable Crops, Agricultural Research Institute, Nicosia 1516, Cyprus
Interests: horticulture; vegetable science; grafting; microgreens; fruit and vegetable quality; ripening physiology; postharvest physiology; carbohydrate metabolism; phytochemicals; functional compounds
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Grafting is among the most ancient agricultural techniques, having been practiced since 2000 BCE. Grafting is the union of two or more pieces of living plant tissue, the root system (rootstock) and the shoot (scion), which are forced to develop vascular connection and grow as a single and unique plant. This agricultural technique is most commonly employed for perennial crop species (fruit trees, nuts and grapevines), and in the last four decades it has also expanded to vegetable species. Vegetable grafting is widely used in Cucurbitaceous (cucumber, melon and watermelon) and Solanaceous crops (eggplant, pepper and tomato) as well as Asteraceae species (artichoke). Grafting of perennial and seasonal crops provides opportunities to exploit natural genetic variation for specific root traits to influence the phenotype of the scion. By selecting a suitable rootstock, grafting can manipulate scion morphology and physiology and can manage biotic stresses including foliar and soil borne pathogens, arthropods, viral diseases, weeds and nematodes, as well as abiotic stresses such as thermal stress, drought, salinity, soil nutrient deficiency and imbalance, adverse soil pH (alkalinity and acidity), heavy metal contamination and organic pollutants. This Special Issue invites Original Research, Technology Report, Methods, Opinion, Perspectives and Reviews and Mini Reviews dissecting grafting as a sustainable agro technology for enhancing tolerance to abiotic stresses and reducing disease damage. Of interest are also potential contributions dealing with genetic resources for rootstock breeding, practices and technologies of rootstock breeding, rootstock-scion signaling as well as the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying graft compatibility. In addition, the effect of grafting on vegetable quality, practical applications and nursery management of grafted seedlings and specialty crops (e.g. artichoke and bean) will be considered within the general scope of the Special Issue. We highly believe that this compilation of high standard scientific papers on principles and practices of vegetable grafting will foster discussions within this important field.

Prof. Dr. Youssef Rouphael
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Colla
Dr. Marios Kyriacou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • perennial crop species
  • fruit trees
  • vegetables
  • breeding
  • rootstocks
  • ripening
  • abiotic/biotic stressors
  • fruit quality
  • physiological mechanism
  • bioactive content
  • compatibility
  • rootstock-scion interaction
  • hormonal signaling
  • nursery

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Productive Characteristics and Fruit Quality Traits of Cherry Tomato Hybrids as Modulated by Grafting on Different Solanum spp. Rootstocks under Ralstonia solanacearum Infested Greenhouse Soil
Agronomy 2021, 11(7), 1311; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11071311 - 28 Jun 2021
Viewed by 277
Abstract
Grafting is increasingly becoming an indispensable tool that minimizes the risks associated with intensive vegetable production systems, including soil-borne diseases. This study assesses the performance of two cherry tomato hybrids (‘Cheramy’ and ‘Sheeja’) grafted onto three tomato and five eggplant local rootstock genotypes [...] Read more.
Grafting is increasingly becoming an indispensable tool that minimizes the risks associated with intensive vegetable production systems, including soil-borne diseases. This study assesses the performance of two cherry tomato hybrids (‘Cheramy’ and ‘Sheeja’) grafted onto three tomato and five eggplant local rootstock genotypes (cultivated/wild) under Ralstonia solanacearum (bacterial wilt)-infested greenhouse soil. The impact of grafting on growth, yield and fruit physical quality was mainly influenced by the response of rootstocks to disease resistance. The non-grafted plants of both the cultivars were severely affected by bacterial wilt, thus presenting high susceptibility to disease. Eggplant rootstocks imparted moderate to high resistance against bacterial wilt in both the scions, while tomato (cultivated or wild) rootstocks did not improve disease resistance, except ‘Anagha’, which provided resistance to scion cv. ‘Cheramy’. In general, scion cv. ‘Cheramy’, grafted or non-grafted, showed superior growth, yield and fruit quality compared to ‘Sheeja’. The most productive graft combinations for both the cultivars involved resistant rootstocks, i.e., ‘Sheeja’ onto eggplant rootstock ‘Surya’, and ‘Cheramy’ onto tomato rootstock ‘Anagha’. Fruit quality attributes such as ascorbic acid and lycopene contents were considerably higher, and the total soluble solids (TSS) content was considerably lower in scion cv. ‘Cheramy’, whether grafted or non-grafted, than those involving scion cv. ‘Sheeja’. The grafting effect on fruit chemical quality attributes was not promising, except grafting ‘Sheeja’ onto ‘Sopim’ for TSS, ‘Sheeja’ onto ‘Sotor’ for lycopene and ‘Cheramy’ onto ‘Ponny’ for total phenols, though no clear connection with disease incidence was in these grafts. Conclusively, eggplant rootstock imparted wilt resistance, while both eggplant and tomato rootstock grafting was beneficial to both scion cultivars in boosting the overall production and economic gains, especially for ‘Cheramy’ grafted onto ‘Anagha’ rootstock under bacterial wilt infested soil of greenhouse. Full article
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Article
Physio-Anatomical Study of Polyploid Watermelon Grafted by Different Methods
Agronomy 2021, 11(5), 913; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11050913 - 06 May 2021
Viewed by 392
Abstract
Watermelon is one of the most desirable vegetable crops in the world. Recently, grafting is common in watermelons worldwide, but not all grafting methods are compatible with polyploids. In this study, diploid, triploid, and tetraploid from one watermelon variety, “Mi Mei”, were grafted [...] Read more.
Watermelon is one of the most desirable vegetable crops in the world. Recently, grafting is common in watermelons worldwide, but not all grafting methods are compatible with polyploids. In this study, diploid, triploid, and tetraploid from one watermelon variety, “Mi Mei”, were grafted on the “Xijiaqiangsheng” squash rootstock to study the effect of genome duplication on graft compatibility. Three grafting methods (splice, hole, and tongue) were used to determine graft compatibility. Significant differences in survival rates, hormones, antioxidants (AOX), sugars, and starch contents were observed between compatible/incompatible combinations. Compatible combinations with high survival rates showed high levels of hormones, AOX, carbohydrates, and low hydrogen peroxide H2O2 compared to incompatible plants. The hole grafting method was more efficient with diploid, while splice was efficient with a tetraploid, and both methods can be used for triploid. Compatibility is a combined effect of hormone, carbohydrate, and antioxidant activities. We predict that compatibility is a complex process and that further molecular studies must be performed to dig deep into this phenomenon. Full article
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