The Role of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria in Crop Improvement

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 April 2024 | Viewed by 2248

Special Issue Editors

Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: legumes; rhizobia; PGPB; halophytes; microbiome; abiotic stress; phytoremediation
Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: legumes; rhizobia; PGPB; halophytes; microbiome; abiotic stress; phytoremediation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to climate change, the quality of the agricultural soils is decreasing, and some human activities make this situation worse. In this context, crops struggle to grow due to the presence of abiotic stresses such as salinity, organic and inorganic pollution, drought, and high temperatures, which interfere with their development, causing a loss of productivity. As the world population is increasing, it is important to promote crop growth, even in degraded soils with the presence of abiotic stress, to feed the population. To stop the reduction in agricultural areas due to human activities, it is necessary to change the way of promoting crop growth, replacing chemical fertilizers and pesticides with more ecofriendly tools.

In both of the cases discussed above, plant-growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are excellent candidates to improve crop development and productivity in order to promote their growth in degraded soils and alleviate plant stress. In addition, PGPB have plant-growth-promoting (PGP) properties, which help plants to uptake nutrients and protect against biotic stresses such as phytopathogens. For this reason, PGPB have the potential to be used as biofertilizers and biopesticides for crop improvement in any environment in sustainable agriculture.

Dr. Salvadora Navarro-Torre
Prof. Dr. Ignacio David Rodríguez-Llorente
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • climate change
  • biofertilizers
  • biopesticides
  • PGPB
  • abiotic stress
  • biotic stress
  • biocontrol

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 4433 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria on Soil Properties and the Physiological and Anatomical Characteristics of Wheat under Water-Deficit Stress Conditions
Agriculture 2023, 13(11), 2042; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13112042 - 24 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1043
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the effects of plant growth-promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) treatments, B1, Azosprillium lipoferum Sp2 and B2, A. lipoferum Sp2 + Pseudomonas sp. SARS12, as well as inorganic nitrogen doses (60, 100, 140 and 180 kg N ha–1) on [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the effects of plant growth-promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) treatments, B1, Azosprillium lipoferum Sp2 and B2, A. lipoferum Sp2 + Pseudomonas sp. SARS12, as well as inorganic nitrogen doses (60, 100, 140 and 180 kg N ha–1) on some soil physical characters, physiological, anatomical and yield parameters as well as nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of wheat under water deficit stress. Results showed that water stress significantly decreased physiological characters such as chlorophyll content (6.7 and 9.8%) and relative water content (13.7 and 11.2%) in both seasons, respectively. Nevertheless, proline and malondialdehyde (MDA) were increased significantly (26.9, 12.3% and 90.2, 96.4%) in both seasons, respectively, as signals for water stress. The anatomical characteristics of flag leaves were negatively affected. Inoculation of wheat grains with PGPR significantly increased field capacity and RWC, adjusted enzymes’ activity and thus improved the physiological and yield traits and NUE as well as improving the anatomical features of flag leaves. Moreover, the combination of integrated PGPR and 140 kg N ha−1 significantly improved grain yield and its components as well as grain N uptake in comparison to control treatments. In conclusion, PGPR improved wheat productivity and NUE; they are an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach for improving plant production, and reducing nutrient leaching hazards and the negative impact of water stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria in Crop Improvement)
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21 pages, 2132 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Upland Rice Growth and Yield with Indigenous Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) Isolate at N-Fertilizers Dosage
Agriculture 2023, 13(10), 1987; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13101987 - 13 Oct 2023
Viewed by 789
Abstract
Upland rice farming plays a crucial role in ensuring food security in Indonesia. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolates on the growth of upland rice. The bioassay and pot experiments were conducted to select the capable [...] Read more.
Upland rice farming plays a crucial role in ensuring food security in Indonesia. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolates on the growth of upland rice. The bioassay and pot experiments were conducted to select the capable isolates of PGPR and to investigate the effect of the PGPR inoculant on the N fertilizer efficiency and agronomic traits of upland rice. The bacterial isolates were identified through a biochemical analysis and tested under controlled greenhouse conditions. The selected PGPR inoculant was formulated as a liquid biofertilizer (LB). The three capable isolates were obtained to fix nitrogen, produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), organic acid, and nitrogenase activity and were identified through a biomolecular analysis as Delftia tsuruhatensis strain D9, Delftia sp. strain MS2As2, and Bacillus sp. The application of the LB into the soil at a dose of 10 L ha−1 and 50 kg ha−1 N resulted in a grain yield of 29.81 g pot−1 and a relative agronomic effectiveness (RAE) value of 235.08%, signifying a significant improvement over the conventional method. Several variables, including the number of grains, number of panicles, root length, 1000-grain weight, population of nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and nitrogen uptake exhibited a strong correlation with the grain yield, accounting for 97.80% of the observed variation. These findings show the enormous potential of PGPR isolates, specifically of Delftia tsuruhatensis strain D9, Delftia sp. strain MS2As2, and Bacillus sp., in significantly enhancing the upland rice output in Indonesia. Furthermore, the use of an LB as a biofertilizer in conjunction with nitrogen fertilization provides a viable and sustainable way to increase yields and enhance the overall sustainability of the region’s upland rice farming systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria in Crop Improvement)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Deciphering the plant-microbial- nanomaterials interaction and mitigating plant stress
Authors: Debasis Mitra
Affiliation: R/138, Microbiology, ICAR- National Rice Research Institute, 753006 Cuttack (Odisha) India
Abstract: In recent decades, the increasing incidences of abiotic and biotic stresses in plants have been a major cause of decrease in crop yield. Abiotic stress including solar radiation, extreme temperature variations, drought, soil salinity, flooding, and heavy metals, etc. have greatly impacted crop yield. Similarly, the biotic stress imposed on plants by several phytopathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, nematodes, and arthropods has become a threat to the growth and development of plants. Presently, these stresses have become an important topic of discussion in both basic and applied fields of botany, agriculture, ecology, and environmental studies. Plants have developed various mechanisms for coping with these stresses. Particularly the interaction or using of new engineered nanomaterials in agriculture that alleviating and resilience of stresses has been an important discovery on sustaining plant growth under stress conditions. Plant signaling coupled with stimulation of cellular responses by particles interaction has been an intricate component of stress management principles. Other side, these nanomaterials - microflora interact with the plant either as endophytes or epiphytes residing in the rhizosphere or phyllosphere. Interestingly, the development of multi-omics technologies and high-performance platforms integrating genomic, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data have made several advancements in deciphering the plant-microbial- nanomaterials interaction and their role played in stress management. Further, the advancements in policy changes, delivery of technology, application of sensors, product formulations, nanofertilizers, genetic transformation and priming, etc. have become important areas of research for stress management of cropping plants on a global scale. In this review, an attempt has been made to shed light on the intricate stress abatement mechanisms delivered by bacteria in plants and available technologies mitigating stress responses, integrating which a holistic approach towards multiple stress management issues in plants could be developed for sustaining crop output.

Title: Effect of Plant Growth-promoting Rhizobacteria on soil properties, physiological and anatomical characters of wheat under water deficit stress correlated with improvement of yield characters
Authors: Khaled Abdelaal
Affiliation: Kafrelsheikh University, Kafr el-Sheikh, Egypt

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