Special Issue "Aviation Logistics and Supply Chain Management"

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Professor Shinya Hanaoka
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Transdisciplinary Science and Engineering, School of Environment and Society, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550, Japan
Interests: air transport; transport logistics; transport development studies
Dr. Sunkyung Choi
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Japan Transport and Tourism Research Institute, Tokyo,105-0001, Japan
Interests: transport planning; airport operation; disaster management; tourist safety and behavior; information provision

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aviation logistics and supply chain management are the key issues encountered when it comes to air transport, for passengers, as well as cargo. Operators need to devise plans and find solutions to improve the efficiency of aviation logistics and supply chain management through cost minimization and other measures. Driven by information and communications technology, supported by data-driven optimization for decision making, global supply chain management now plays a crucial role in enterprises and industries.

This Special Issue addresses these concerns by inviting papers relevant to aviation logistics and supply chain management, including airport operation, management, ground handling, security, emergency, safety issues and logistics performance, international logistics, global supply chain management, coordinated efforts in supply chain management, facility location, and network configurations. This is an opportunity for academics and practitioners working in the fields of aviation logistics and supply chain management to publish their original research and review articles.

Prof. Dr. Shinya Hanaoka
Dr. Sunkyung Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aviation logistics
  • Airport operation
  • Airport security and safety
  • Airport emergency operation
  • Air freight
  • Data analytics on logistics
  • Facility location and supply chain
  • Flight planning
  • Global supply chain management
  • Ground handling
  • Intermodal logistics
  • International and cross-border freight transportation
  • Logistics and operations management
  • Logistics performance index
  • Logistics system planning and design
  • Supply chain integration and coordination
  • Supply chain management
  • Supply chain network analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
An Agent-Based Empirical Game Theory Approach for Airport Security Patrols
Aerospace 2020, 7(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7010008 - 18 Jan 2020
Abstract
Airports are attractive targets for terrorists, as they are designed to accommodate and process large amounts of people, resulting in a high concentration of potential victims. A popular method to mitigate the risk of terrorist attacks is through security patrols, but resources are [...] Read more.
Airports are attractive targets for terrorists, as they are designed to accommodate and process large amounts of people, resulting in a high concentration of potential victims. A popular method to mitigate the risk of terrorist attacks is through security patrols, but resources are often limited. Game theory is commonly used as a methodology to find optimal patrol routes for security agents such that security risks are minimized. However, game-theoretic models suffer from payoff uncertainty and often rely solely on expert assessment to estimate game payoffs. Experts cannot incorporate all aspects of a terrorist attack in their assessment. For instance, attacker behavior, which contributes to the game payoff rewards, is hard to estimate precisely. To address this shortcoming, we proposed a novel empirical game theory approach in which payoffs are estimated using agent-based modeling. Using this approach, we simulated different attacker and defender strategies in an agent-based model to estimate game-theoretic payoffs, while a security game was used to find optimal security patrols. We performed a case study at a regional airport, and show that the optimal security patrol is non-deterministic and gives special emphasis to high-impact areas, such as the security checkpoint. The found security patrol routes are an improvement over previously found security strategies of the same case study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aviation Logistics and Supply Chain Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Prediction of Aircraft Waiting Time at Airport During Immediate Response to Disaster
Aerospace 2019, 6(4), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace6040040 - 03 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Air transportation is especially critical to the immediate response that must be provided after a natural disaster strikes a region. Airport operations are hindered by fluctuating waiting times across different operation types because of bottlenecks caused by unexpected amounts of aid goods, aircraft, [...] Read more.
Air transportation is especially critical to the immediate response that must be provided after a natural disaster strikes a region. Airport operations are hindered by fluctuating waiting times across different operation types because of bottlenecks caused by unexpected amounts of aid goods, aircraft, and emergency workers. To address this problem, this study proposes a model for estimating the waiting time of an aircraft at an airport during the immediate response phase after a disaster. The proposed framework was developed by applying an open Jackson network with first-come first-served, priority, and mixed-queuing disciplines. These disciplines are compared through a numerical example based on data acquired from the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011. The results indicate that the mixed-queuing discipline reduces the waiting time for higher-priority operators, with permissible waiting times for lower-priority operators. The results of this study reveal that various disaster response operations should be prioritized ahead of a natural disaster occurring, such that the waiting times for those operators involved in life-saving activities can be reduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aviation Logistics and Supply Chain Management)
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