Special Issue "9th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space"

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Spiros Pantelakis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Honorary Chairman of the European Aeronautics Science Network Association (EASN), Head of the Laboratory of Technology and Strength of Materials, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics, University of Patras, Panepistimioupolis Rion, 26500 Patras, Greece
Interests: aeronautical materials and structures; mechanical behaviour of materials; structural integrity; damage mechanics; experimental fracture mechanics; fatigue of aircraft materials and structures; ageing aircraft; characterization and manufacturing processes of polymers, thermosetting and thermoplastic composites; nanocomposites and nanocrystalline alloys; multifunctional and self-healing materials
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Prof. Dr. Andreas Strohmayer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chairman of the European Aeronautics Science Network Association (EASN), Head of Department Aircraft Design, Institute of Aircraft Design (IFB), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Interests: aircraft design; conventional and unconventional configurations; aircraft systems; operational aspects; certification; electric and hybrid-electric flight; alternative propulsion systems; flight testing; unmanned aerial vehicles; scaled flight testing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is cooperating with the 9th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space (https://easnconference.eu/home), which will take place in Athens, Greece from the 3rd until the 6th of September, 2019.

This conference will act as a forum where innovative ideas, breakthrough concepts, and disruptive technologies are presented, while in parallel be the place for disseminating the knowledge and results achieved in the frame of research projects of the aviation and space field. The 9th EASN International Conference will include a number of Plenary Talks by distinguished personalities of the European aviation and space sectors from academia, industry, research community, and policymakers. It will also include Thematic Sessions, along with Technical Workshops where evolving ideas, technologies, products, services, and processes will be discussed. The identification of possible synergies and interactions with other sectors (e.g., automotive) will be a key aspect of the event.

Furthermore, the conference is expected to be a major European dissemination and exploitation event of aviation & space-related research. The majority of currently running research projects will exploit the 3-day technical program to present their activities and achieved goals, discuss current trends and future needs of aviation & space-related research and try to identify possible synergies with each other. Additionally, a number of policy development projects will also take the floor to present the strategic priorities of the European aviation sector with regard to the challenges of FlightPath2050 and the expected “Horizon Europe” Framework Programme.

Authors of outstanding papers related to Aviation & Space are invited to submit extended versions of their work to this Special Issue for publication.

Prof. Dr. Spiros Pantelakis
Prof. Dr. Andreas Strohmayer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aerostructures: Manufacturing
  • Aerostructures: Materials
  • Flight physics
  • Propulsion
  • Avionics, systems, and Equipment
  • Air traffic management and airports
  • Human factors
  • Innovative concepts and scenarios
  • Industry 4.0 and factories of the future
  • Space science, technologies, and exploration
  • Space applications and operations
  • Space policies
  • Environmental, recycling, and disposal strategies
  • Safety, regulation, and standards
  • Synergies and technology transfer with the automotive industry
  • European policy actions in the field of aviation & space

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Estimation of Performance Parameters of Turbine Engine Components Using Experimental Data in Parametric Uncertainty Conditions
Aerospace 2020, 7(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7010006 - 16 Jan 2020
Abstract
Zero-dimensional models based on the description of the thermo-gas-dynamic process are widely used in the design of engines and their control and diagnostic systems. The models are subjected to an identification procedure to bring their outputs as close as possible to experimental data [...] Read more.
Zero-dimensional models based on the description of the thermo-gas-dynamic process are widely used in the design of engines and their control and diagnostic systems. The models are subjected to an identification procedure to bring their outputs as close as possible to experimental data and assess engine health. This paper aims to improve the stability of engine model identification when the number of measured parameters is small, and their measurement error is not negligible. The proposed method for the estimation of engine components’ parameters, based on multi-criteria identification, provides stable estimations and their confidence intervals within known measurement errors. A priori information about the engine, its parameters and performance is used directly in the regularized identification procedure. The mathematical basis for this approach is the fuzzy sets theory. Synthesis of objective functions and subsequent scalar convolutions of these functions are used to estimate gas-path components’ parameters. A comparison with traditional methods showed that the main advantage of the proposed approach is the high stability of estimation in the parametric uncertainty conditions. Regularization reduces scattering, excludes incorrect solutions that do not correspond to a priori assumptions and also helps to implement the gas path analysis with a limited number of measured parameters. The method can be used for matching thermodynamic models to experimental data, gas path analysis and adapting dynamic models to the needs of the engine control system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 9th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space)
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Open AccessArticle
Superhydrophobic Coatings as Anti-Icing Systems for Small Aircraft
Aerospace 2020, 7(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7010002 - 02 Jan 2020
Abstract
Traditional anti-icing/de-icing systems, i.e., thermal and pneumatic, in most cases require a power consumption not always allowable in small aircraft. Therefore, the use of passive systems, able to delay the ice formation, or reduce the ice adhesion strength once formed, with no additional [...] Read more.
Traditional anti-icing/de-icing systems, i.e., thermal and pneumatic, in most cases require a power consumption not always allowable in small aircraft. Therefore, the use of passive systems, able to delay the ice formation, or reduce the ice adhesion strength once formed, with no additional energy consumption, can be considered as the most promising solution to solve the problem of the ice formation, most of all, for small aircraft. In some cases, the combination of a traditional icing protection system (electrical, pneumatic, and thermal) and the passive coatings can be considered as a strategic instrument to reduce the energy consumption. The effort of the present work was to develop a superhydrophobic coating, able to reduce the surface free energy (SFE) and the work of adhesion (WA) of substrates, by a simplified and non-expensive method. The developed coating, applied as a common paint with an aerograph, is able to reduce the SFE of substrates by 99% and the WA by 94%. The effects of both chemistry and surface morphology on the wettability of surfaces were also studied. In the reference samples, the higher the roughness, the lower the SFE and the WA. In coated samples with roughness ranging from 0.4 and 3 µm no relevant variations in water contact angle, nor in SFE and WA were observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 9th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Aircraft Surface Heat Exchanger Potential
Aerospace 2020, 7(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7010001 - 19 Dec 2019
Abstract
Providing sufficient cooling power for an aircraft will become increasingly challenging with the introduction of (hybrid-) electric propulsion. To avoid excessive drag from heat exchangers, the heat sink potential of the aircraft surface is evaluated in this study. Semi-empirical correlations are used to [...] Read more.
Providing sufficient cooling power for an aircraft will become increasingly challenging with the introduction of (hybrid-) electric propulsion. To avoid excessive drag from heat exchangers, the heat sink potential of the aircraft surface is evaluated in this study. Semi-empirical correlations are used to estimate aircraft surface area and heat transfer. The impact of surface heating on aircraft drag is qualitatively assessed. Locating surface heat exchangers where fully turbulent flow is present promises a decrease in aircraft drag. Surface cooling potential is investigated over a range from small regional aircraft to large wide body jets and a range of surface temperatures. Four mission points are considered: Take-off, hot day take-off, climb and cruise. The results show that surface heat exchangers can provide cooling power in the same order of magnitude as the waste heat expected from (hybrid-) electric drive trains for all sizes of considered aircraft. Also, a clear trend favouring smaller aircraft with regards to the ratio of available to required cooling power is visible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 9th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space)
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Open AccessArticle
Determination of Serviceability Limits of a Turboshaft Engine by the Criterion of Blade Natural Frequency and Stall Margin
Aerospace 2019, 6(12), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace6120132 - 09 Dec 2019
Abstract
This paper analyzes the health and performance of the 12-stage axial compressor of the TV3-117VM/VMA turboshaft operated in a desert environment. The results of the dimensional control of 4800 worn blades are analyzed to model the wear process. Operational experience and two-phase flow [...] Read more.
This paper analyzes the health and performance of the 12-stage axial compressor of the TV3-117VM/VMA turboshaft operated in a desert environment. The results of the dimensional control of 4800 worn blades are analyzed to model the wear process. Operational experience and two-phase flow simulations are used to assess the effectiveness of an inlet particle separator. Numerical modal analysis is performed to generate the Campbell diagram of the worn blades and identify resonant blade vibrations which can lead to high cycle fatigue (HCF): mode 7 engine order 30 in the first stage and mode 8 engine order 60 in the fourth. It is also shown that the gradual loss of the stall margin over time determines the serviceability limits of compressor blades. In particular, the chord wear of sixth-stage blades as high as 6.19 mm results in a reduction of the stall margin by 15–17% and a permanent stall at 770–790 flight hours. In addition, recommendations setting out go/no-go criteria are made to maintenance and repair organizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 9th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space)
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Open AccessArticle
Predesign Considerations for the DC Link Voltage Level of the CENTRELINE Fuselage Fan Drive Unit
Aerospace 2019, 6(12), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace6120126 - 20 Nov 2019
Abstract
Electric propulsion (EP) systems offer considerably more degrees of freedom (DOFs) within the design process of aircraft compared to conventional aircraft engines. This requires large, computationally expensive design space explorations (DSE) with coupled models of the single components to incorporate interdependencies during optimization. [...] Read more.
Electric propulsion (EP) systems offer considerably more degrees of freedom (DOFs) within the design process of aircraft compared to conventional aircraft engines. This requires large, computationally expensive design space explorations (DSE) with coupled models of the single components to incorporate interdependencies during optimization. The purpose of this paper is to exemplarily study these interdependencies of system key performance parameters (KPIs), e.g., system mass and efficiency, for a varying DC link voltage level of the power transmission system considering the example of the propulsion system of the CENTRELINE project, including an electric motor, a DC/AC inverter, and the DC power transmission cables. Each component is described by a physically derived, analytical model linking specific subdomains, e.g., electromagnetics, structural mechanics and thermal analysis, which are used for a coupled system model. This approach strongly enhances model accuracy and simultaneously keeps the computational effort at a low level. The results of the DSE reveal that the system KPIs improve for higher DC link voltage despite slightly inferior performance of motor and inverter as the mass of the DC power transmission cable has a major share for a an aircraft of the size as in the CENTRELINE project. Modeling of further components and implementation of optimization strategies will be part of future work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 9th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space)
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