Special Issue "Entrepreneurship Education"

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387). This special issue belongs to the section "International Entrepreneurship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Virginia Barba Sánchez
Website
Guest Editor
Head of ENSITMA Research Group, Department of Business Administration, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 02071-Albacete, Spain
Interests: Environmental Strategy; Entrepreneurship; ICT and innovation; Social Accounting
Dr. María Emilia García-Pérez

Guest Editor
Department of Economic Analysis and Finances, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Albacete, Spain
Interests: entrepreneurship education, entrepreneurship skills, economic analysis, ICT

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of entrepreneurial spirit has been the subject of numerous research articles as a means to generate business projects (e.g. Bae et al., 2014; Barba-Sánchez and Atienza-Sahuquillo, 2016). Prior research suggests that identifying and nurturing potential entrepreneurs throughout the education process could produce many long-term economic benefits (e.g. Honig, 2004; Oosterbeek et al., 2010). Within the university teaching arena, there have been several initiatives in recent years to encourage the creation of companies, such as the inclusion of specific subjects on the creation of companies in certain syllabuses, the creation of self-employment support units, the creation of university seedbeds, and the holding of creativity and entrepreneurship workshops, with scant success in terms of the effectiveness in the increase of entrepreneurship rates among our youth (Barba-Sánchez and Atienza-Sahuquillo, 2018). Among the main reasons, the literature highlights the actions aimed at the youngest age group (Athayde, 2009; Benker et al., 2014; Scott, et al., 2016).

The aim of this Special Issue is to open up some lines of advance to further develop the research in this field from different points of view. Authors from different disciplines, such as management, education, social sciences, and other disciplines related to the entrepreneurship education development issue, are invited to submit their papers. Studies that conduct critical theoretical analysis, comparative observation, empirical testing, and longitudinal case investigations relating to the Special Issue are particularly encouraged and welcome.

Submissions for the Special Issue could relate, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • -Entrepreneurship education as part of the curriculum for primary and secondary school-age children.
  • -Study of entrepreneurship in higher education, especially non-business studies.
  • -The relationship between entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial intention.
  • -Innovative experiences in the field of entrepreneurship education based on project-based learning approach, such as Junior Enterprises.
  • -The effect of information and communication technologies (ICT) in entrepreneurship education.
  • -The impact of entrepreneurship education within the social entrepreneurship sector.
  • -The influence of contextual variables in promoting entrepreneurship, with a special interest in the role of primary schools, secondary schools, and colleges and universities.

References

Athayde, R. (2009). Measuring enterprise potential in young people. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 33(2), 481-500.

Bae, T. J., Qian, S., Miao, C., & Fiet, J. O. (2014). The relationship between entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial intentions: A meta‐analytic review. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 38(2), 217-254.

Barba-Sánchez, V., & Atienza-Sahuquillo, C. (2016). The development of entrepreneurship at school: the Spanish experience. Education and Training, 58(7/8), 783-796.

Barba-Sánchez, V., & Atienza-Sahuquillo, C. (2018). Entrepreneurial intention among engineering students: The role of entrepreneurship education. European Research on Management and Business Economics, 24(1), 53-61.

Blenker, P., Elmholdt, S.T., Frederiksen, S.H., Korsgaard, S. & Wagner, K. (2014). Methods in entrepreneurship education research: a review and integrative framework. Education + Training, 56(8/9), 697-715.

Honig, B. (2004). Entrepreneurship education: toward a model of contingency-based business planning. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 3, 258-273.

Oosterbeek, H., van Praag, H., & Ijsselstein A. (2010). The impact of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurship skills and motivation. European Economic Review, 54(3), 442-454.

Scott, J.M., Penaluna, A., & Thompson, J.L. (2016). A critical perspective on learning outcomes and the effectiveness of experiential approaches in entrepreneurship education. Education + Training, 58(1), 82-93.

Dr. Virginia Barba-Sánchez
Dr. María Emilia García-Pérez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Are European Part-Time MBA Programs Designed to Foster Entrepreneurial Minds? An Exploratory Study
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9030048 - 26 Jun 2019
Viewed by 1220
Abstract
Are the MBA programs really designed to foster entrepreneurial minds? Answering this question is the main objective of our work. After a literature review we identified several programs’ characteristics that promote entrepreneurship. Using a sample of 99 executive or part-time MBA programs, we [...] Read more.
Are the MBA programs really designed to foster entrepreneurial minds? Answering this question is the main objective of our work. After a literature review we identified several programs’ characteristics that promote entrepreneurship. Using a sample of 99 executive or part-time MBA programs, we found that the diversity in this sector is high. Not all the programs have been designed to foster entrepreneurship behavior; moreover, most of them do not even have an entrepreneurship subject in their curriculum. Nevertheless, other dimensions that favor this type of behavior, like internationality, are widespread in the European MBA market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurship Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Entrepreneurship Education and Disability: An Experience at a Spanish University
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9020034 - 10 Apr 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1546
Abstract
The European Commission considers the following groups of entrepreneurs: females, family businesses, liberal professions, migrants, and seniors. Disabled people are not included, and this paper could, therefore, open up a new field of research and an important issue to be considered among the [...] Read more.
The European Commission considers the following groups of entrepreneurs: females, family businesses, liberal professions, migrants, and seniors. Disabled people are not included, and this paper could, therefore, open up a new field of research and an important issue to be considered among the European Union’s social objectives. The University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM) in Spain provides an entrepreneurship education course, “Entrepreneurship and disability,” for disabled students. It is the first time that a course with these characteristics has been taught at a Spanish University, which signifies that there is no similar research of this nature. Keeping in mind its originality, this study makes an important contribution to the field. The main objective is to analyze whether the motivation to start up a business differs between students with disabilities and those without. We analyzed “before” and “after” data in order to test the potential impact of entrepreneurship education on the students’ entrepreneurial attitude. An analysis of variance with several demographic variables has allowed us to prove that the education that students received, their business experience, and their field of study have significant effects. This statistical test showed no significant differences between disabled and non-disabled students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurship Education)
Open AccessArticle
Psychological and Biographical Determinants of Entrepreneurial Intention: Does the Learning Environment Act as a Mediator?
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9020033 - 07 Apr 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1422
Abstract
The aim of this research is to study the mediating role of the learning process in explaining the relationships between certain psychological and biographical characteristics and entrepreneurial intention. The findings suggest that the effect of psychological and biographical aspects on entrepreneurial intention depend [...] Read more.
The aim of this research is to study the mediating role of the learning process in explaining the relationships between certain psychological and biographical characteristics and entrepreneurial intention. The findings suggest that the effect of psychological and biographical aspects on entrepreneurial intention depend on the extent to which students are able to take advantage of their personal capabilities in order to develop an effective learning process. Learning process factors (information about course guides, student effort and educational processes) mediate the relationships between specific psychological factors (achievement need, internal control and autonomy) and entrepreneurial intention. With regard to biographical factors, we find no mediating effect on entrepreneurial intention through the learning process. The present study provides a better understanding of the antecedents of entrepreneurial intention, helping to fill the gap in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurship Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Entrepreneurship Education in a Multidisciplinary Environment: Evidence from an Entrepreneurship Programme Held in Turin
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9010028 - 26 Mar 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3909
Abstract
Entrepreneurship education can increase student’s entrepreneurial skills and intention; and entrepreneurship activities stimulate economic growth. Therefore, the number of entrepreneurship courses is increasing, but they are often offered to students from a specific field of study and/or to only one educational level, even [...] Read more.
Entrepreneurship education can increase student’s entrepreneurial skills and intention; and entrepreneurship activities stimulate economic growth. Therefore, the number of entrepreneurship courses is increasing, but they are often offered to students from a specific field of study and/or to only one educational level, even though multidisciplinarity is important for entrepreneurship. This study has carried out an exploratory single case study on an entrepreneurial programme in a multidisciplinary environment, that is, the Contamination Lab of Turin (CLabTo). Moreover, pre- and post-surveys have also been conducted in order to perform some qualitative analyses. The results show the importance of creating teams with different competencies, cognitive and decision-making skills. Moreover, we explain how design-thinking is useful in entrepreneurship education and that a challenge-based entrepreneurship course leads to cooperation with external actors in the local entrepreneurial ecosystem. It is also explained what the obstacles and opportunities of these programmes are and how to improve them. Moreover, on the basis of pre- and post-surveys, our qualitative analyses show that the students’ overall perception of their abilities to work in a multidisciplinary team, their entrepreneurial skills and entrepreneurial intentions increased slightly. In short, this work is aimed at increasing the importance of entrepreneurship education in a multidisciplinary environment and the use of practical-oriented teaching models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurship Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Entrepreneurial Education Programs on Total Entrepreneurial Activity: The Case of Spain
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9010025 - 13 Mar 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1678
Abstract
There is a need to evaluate entrepreneurial education programs (EEPs) to see the impact they have on a country’s development. Previous work has focused mostly on entrepreneurial intentions, mainly in a university context. Additionally, literature reviews on the impact of entrepreneurial education have [...] Read more.
There is a need to evaluate entrepreneurial education programs (EEPs) to see the impact they have on a country’s development. Previous work has focused mostly on entrepreneurial intentions, mainly in a university context. Additionally, literature reviews on the impact of entrepreneurial education have not yet been conclusive, mainly due to the use of subjective indicators and a low consideration of objective indicators. The purpose of this article is to respond to some of these challenges. Specifically, this study used an objective indicator, Total Early-Stage Entrepreneurial Activity (TEA), in a non-university context. A database was created that included programs categorized by autonomous communities. The analysis showed that EEPs significantly influenced the entrepreneurial activity of autonomous communities. This implies that entrepreneurial education should be a prioritized objective in the educational policy of these communities. The recommendations derived from these results are, among others, to promote role models, continue supporting the financing of entrepreneurial initiatives through education and training, continue implementing government policies to support entrepreneurship, and carry out evaluations on the impact that these programs have on skills acquired in the short and medium terms, as well as their maintenance over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurship Education)
Open AccessArticle
The Role of Higher Education in Development of Entrepreneurial Competencies: Some Insights from Castilla-La Mancha University in Spain
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9010016 - 08 Feb 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1671
Abstract
This study presents an analysis of the entrepreneurial competences of second- and fourth-year undergraduate students at the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM), under the framework of the Entrepreneurial Teachers Network, an ongoing project at this institution. The analysis of a sample of 1874 [...] Read more.
This study presents an analysis of the entrepreneurial competences of second- and fourth-year undergraduate students at the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM), under the framework of the Entrepreneurial Teachers Network, an ongoing project at this institution. The analysis of a sample of 1874 students identified three profiles of competences of students at the UCLM. The first profile is related to competences in performing and resolving activities, the second is related to risk aversion and uncertainty management and the third is associated with the capacity for teamwork. Furthermore, it was found that the competences related to implementing and performing activities significantly influence job creation as they exhibit a positive relationship with the intention of creating a company in the first three years after graduation. Emotion-related competences also exhibit a significant effect on entrepreneurial intention, although this association is negative. Finally, relation-based competences were found to have no impact on entrepreneurial intention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurship Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhancing Entrepreneurship Education in a Master’s Degree in Computer Engineering: A Project-Based Learning Approach
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8040058 - 04 Oct 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1658
Abstract
New master’s degrees in computer engineering, designed according to Spanish government requirements, include both technical and business subjects to provide advanced knowledge compared to undergraduate studies. In spite of acquiring this advanced knowledge, our students are not always aware of the significant added [...] Read more.
New master’s degrees in computer engineering, designed according to Spanish government requirements, include both technical and business subjects to provide advanced knowledge compared to undergraduate studies. In spite of acquiring this advanced knowledge, our students are not always aware of the significant added value and the positive elements the master’s degree provides for their future professional careers. Moreover, we have observed that students regard the different subjects as isolated blocks of knowledge. To tackle these problems, we have carried out a learning experience based on the creation of a technology-based enterprise (TBE) through the development of a common project (CP). Drawing on project-based learning (PBL) methodology, the CP consists of the identification, development, and final oral presentation of a business model. It aims to utilize sensor data and analysis in different domains. The experience has been highly positive, reducing the gap between studies and business practice, and increasing coordination among teachers. A key issue is that all the subjects of the master’s degree are involved in this learning experience. In addition, results show a high level of satisfaction with the master’s degree, compared to other similar courses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurship Education)
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