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Adolescents, Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2023) – 14 articles

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17 pages, 1946 KiB  
Article
Emotional Expectancies and Hostile Attributions as Predictors of Adolescents’ Expressions of Emotion with Parents
by Eric W. Lindsey
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 182-198; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010014 - 16 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1351
Abstract
The present study examined associations between adolescents’ Emotional Expectancies (EE), Hostile Attributions of Intent (HAI), and emotions expressed during interactions with their mother and father. Data were collected from 96 14- to 16-year-olds (27 African Americans, 38 European Americans, and 31 Latinos; a [...] Read more.
The present study examined associations between adolescents’ Emotional Expectancies (EE), Hostile Attributions of Intent (HAI), and emotions expressed during interactions with their mother and father. Data were collected from 96 14- to 16-year-olds (27 African Americans, 38 European Americans, and 31 Latinos; a total of 51 girls and 45 boys) and their parents over a period of 2 years. Questionnaires completed by adolescents were used to assess emotional expectancies and hostile attributions of parents’ behavior. In both year one and year two, adolescent emotional expressiveness with parents was observed in a laboratory interaction session. Data revealed that both adolescents’ EE and HAI in reaction to ambiguous situations predicted their expression of positive emotion with their mother and father 1 year later. EE of happiness were positively related and EE of anger were negatively related to the expression of positive emotion with their mother and father. HAI were negatively related to the expression of positive emotion. Only HAI were related to a higher expression of anger with their mother and father. The findings indicate that HAI and EE represent distinct cognitive-emotional processes that contribute to individual differences in adolescents’ expressions of emotion with parents. Full article
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9 pages, 257 KiB  
Article
Associations of Passive Drinking with Perceived Health Status, Mental Health, and Family Wellbeing in Hong Kong Chinese Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Siu Long Chau, Yongda Wu, Man Ping Wang and Sai Yin Ho
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 173-181; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010013 - 16 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1412
Abstract
Passive drinking is prevalent in adolescents worldwide, but its prevalence and harm are understudied. Secondary students (n = 5840, grades 7–12) from 23 selected schools in Hong Kong participated in the survey from 2015–16. Students reported the harm of passive drinking, perceived [...] Read more.
Passive drinking is prevalent in adolescents worldwide, but its prevalence and harm are understudied. Secondary students (n = 5840, grades 7–12) from 23 selected schools in Hong Kong participated in the survey from 2015–16. Students reported the harm of passive drinking, perceived health status (Patient Health Questionnaire-2 and Perceived Stress Scale-4), perceived happiness, and family health, happiness, and harmony in the questionnaire. The associations were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression (odds ratio, OR) and linear regression (unstandardized coefficient, b), adjusted for confounders. It was found that 29.1% (95% CI 27.8 to 30.5%) of students experienced passive drinking in the past 30 days. The past 30-day parental passive drinking was associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms (AOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.10), stress (adjusted b 0.76, 0.42 to 1.10), and lower level of perceived happiness (adjusted b −0.52, −0.72 to −0.33). The past 30-day parental passive drinking was associated with a lower level of family health (adjusted b −1.39, 95% CI −1.66 to −1.11), family happiness (adjusted b −1.36, −1.64 to −1.08), and family harmony (adjusted b −1.40, −1.70 to −1.10). Passive drinking was associated with poorer mental health, family wellbeing, and a lower level of happiness among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Adolescent Health and Mental Health)
20 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
The Brother–Sister Sibling Dyad as a Pathway to Gender-Based Violence Prevention: Engaging Male Siblings in Family-Strengthening Programs in Humanitarian Settings
by Andrea Koris, Monica Giuffrida, Kristine Anderson, Hana Shalouf, Ibrahim Saley, Ahmad Marei, Ilana Seff, Julianne Deitch and Lindsay Stark
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 153-172; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010012 - 2 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 19543
Abstract
Household violence poses a significant threat to the physical and mental health of adolescent girls. In conflict-affected communities, increased stresses to safety, security, health, and livelihoods may heighten this risk. While it is widely evidenced that the caregiver-child relationship can increase or protect [...] Read more.
Household violence poses a significant threat to the physical and mental health of adolescent girls. In conflict-affected communities, increased stresses to safety, security, health, and livelihoods may heighten this risk. While it is widely evidenced that the caregiver-child relationship can increase or protect against girls’ risk of violence, less is known about the role of male siblings. Sibling Support for Adolescent Girls in Emergencies (SSAGE) used whole-family support programming to synchronously engage adolescent girls, their male siblings, and their caregivers in conflict-affected communities in Jordan and Niger, using gender-transformative approaches to explore the impacts of gender norms, power, and violence and encourage support and emotional connection. We conducted qualitative research activities, including focus group discussions, participatory group activities, and in-depth, paired, and key informant interviews with 469 SSAGE participants and program facilitators to explore SSAGE’s impact on the male-female sibling dyad in both settings. The multi-stakeholder team used a collaborative thematic analysis approach to identify emergent themes. Findings suggest that the inclusion of male siblings in family strengthening programs may have a positive impact on factors related to girls’ protection, with research participants discussing decreased perpetration of physical and verbal violence by male siblings, increased equity in household labor between siblings, and improved trust and mutual support among siblings. These changes were facilitated by improved communication and interrogation of positive gender identities. In humanitarian settings, interventions that support more gender-transformative, egalitarian, and emotionally effective relationships between male-female siblings can work towards improving girls’ protective assets. More research on the impact of this relationship on girls’ experience of immediate and long-term experience of violence is needed. In settings where gender power dynamics among male-female siblings are less salient, other relationship dyads should be explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Equity and Girls’ Health)
12 pages, 499 KiB  
Article
Mental Health Screening for Korean Ukrainian Refugee Minors in the Republic of Korea: A Cross Sectional Pilot Study
by Sejeong Park, Jenny Seongryung Lee, Hye-Jung Kim, Hojung Lee, Myungjoo Lee, Soo-Yeon Kim and Han Choi
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 141-152; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010011 - 21 Feb 2023
Viewed by 2014
Abstract
Since February 2022, the Ukrainian refugee crisis has been highlighting mental health problems associated with trauma and distress. This study aimed to evaluate the mental health status of twenty-seven refugee minors (10 to 18 years old) who fled Ukraine and temporarily settled in [...] Read more.
Since February 2022, the Ukrainian refugee crisis has been highlighting mental health problems associated with trauma and distress. This study aimed to evaluate the mental health status of twenty-seven refugee minors (10 to 18 years old) who fled Ukraine and temporarily settled in the Republic of Korea (ROK). This cross-sectional survey study aimed to evaluate the mental health status of ethnic Korean Ukrainian refugee minors. The Child and Adolescent Trauma ScreenYouth Report (CATS), generalized anxiety disorder seven-item scale (GAD-7), and subjective unit of distress scale (SUDs) were used for assessment. A preliminary analysis indicated that 77% Ukrainian refugee minors were exposed to and experienced war-related trauma. They are at a relatively low risk of trauma symptoms, anxiety, and distress due to stable family and visa status and a comparably better environment in the ROK. Meanwhile, refugee teenagers showed higher rates of psychological distress compared with refugee children. This finding suggests that an early psychological interventions in a host country may be beneficial to prevent mental health issues in refugee minors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Collection Featured Research in Adolescent Health)
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10 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
Associations between Mental Health and COVID-19 Status among 18- and 19-Year-Old Adolescents: A Multi-Country Study
by Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan, Roberto Ariel Abeldaño Zuñiga, Mir Faeq Ali Quadri, Joanne Lusher, Balgis Gaffar, Passent Ellakany, Annie L. Nguyen and Maha El Tantawi
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 131-140; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010010 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1777
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the mental health status of 18- and 19-year-old adolescents who were infected or affected by COVID-19 during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. This was a secondary analysis of a dataset collected from 152 [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to describe the mental health status of 18- and 19-year-old adolescents who were infected or affected by COVID-19 during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. This was a secondary analysis of a dataset collected from 152 countries between July and December 2020. Dependent variables were anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms. The independent variable was COVID-19 status (tested positive for COVID-19, had COVID-19 symptoms but did not test, had a close friend who tested positive for COVID-19, knew someone who died from COVID-19). Three multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the associations between the dependent and independent variables while adjusting for confounding variables (sex—male, female, and country income level). Data of 547 participants were extracted, and 98 (17.9%) had experienced depression, 130 (23.8%) had experienced anxiety, and 219 (40.0%) had experienced post-traumatic stress symptoms. Knowing someone who died from COVID-19 was associated with significantly lower odds of having post-traumatic stress symptoms (AOR: 0.608). Having COVID-19 symptoms but not getting tested was associated with significantly higher odds of having anxiety symptoms (AOR: 2.473). Results indicate diverse mental health responses among adolescents aged 18–19-years old as a sequela of COVID-19. This needs to be studied further. Full article
(This article belongs to the Collection Featured Research in Adolescent Health)
21 pages, 2297 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of Digital Health Tools to Prevent Bullying among Middle School Students
by Christopher Williams, Kenneth W. Griffin, Caroline M. Botvin, Sandra Sousa and Gilbert J. Botvin
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 110-130; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010009 - 26 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3271
Abstract
Bullying is a widespread public health problem with significant behavioral and mental health consequences. The current study tested the effectiveness of combining interactive digital material for students, educators, and parents with class sessions to prevent bullying among middle school students. Fourteen middle schools [...] Read more.
Bullying is a widespread public health problem with significant behavioral and mental health consequences. The current study tested the effectiveness of combining interactive digital material for students, educators, and parents with class sessions to prevent bullying among middle school students. Fourteen middle schools were randomly assigned to intervention and comparison conditions. Both conditions received a classroom-based drug and violence prevention program that taught social skills, self-management skills, and social resistance skills. The intervention condition included class material on bullying and an educational video game for students that reinforced the classroom program; it also included digital material on bullying for parents and school staff. All students completed online pre- and post-test surveys to assess bullying-related behavior, knowledge, and life skills. Results indicated that students in the intervention schools reported significantly less bullying and cyberbullying perpetration and increased life skills knowledge relative to comparison schools. This study provides evidence that a school-based drug abuse and violence prevention program, when enhanced with a set of digital tools for students, parents, and school staff, holds considerable potential for addressing bullying among middle school adolescents. Full article
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18 pages, 298 KiB  
Article
Migration as Cultural Phenomenon in a Globalized World: A Pilot Study on Lifestyle and Eating Behaviours of Adolescents Living in Rome
by Federica Intorre, Maria Stella Foddai and Eugenia Venneria
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 92-109; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010008 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1410
Abstract
The aim of this research was to assess, through an observational study, lifestyle and eating behaviours of adolescents (native, and first- and second-generation immigrants), in order to understand if the migration process may have influenced these aspects. The study was carried out by [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was to assess, through an observational study, lifestyle and eating behaviours of adolescents (native, and first- and second-generation immigrants), in order to understand if the migration process may have influenced these aspects. The study was carried out by a structured questionnaire packet that investigated anthropometric data, eating habits, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and sedentary behaviours. A total of 105 respondents, aged 10–24 years (51.4% first-generation immigrants, 19.1% second-generation immigrants, and 29.5% natives) were included in the study. The results showed statistical differences in some social aspects by migration status, such as place of residence, living arrangement, parental educational level, and eating differently from family members. Despite these differences, volunteers were perfectly integrated regarding most eating habits and lifestyle behaviour, underlying a process of acculturation. Moreover, our study indicates the existence of inadequate dietary habits, such as skipping breakfast. It is important to implement effective nutrition interventions for adolescents to promote healthier lifestyle choices, considering that they should also include cultural components of dietary habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immigrant Adolescents: Opportunities and Challenges)
8 pages, 222 KiB  
Article
Cyber Sexual Harassment among Adolescent Girls: A Qualitative Analysis
by Marissa Salazar, Anita Raj, Jay G. Silverman, Melanie L. A. Rusch and Elizabeth Reed
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 84-91; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010007 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2886
Abstract
Background: Research efforts are increasingly recognizing young girls’ experiences of technology facilitated sexual harassment, which includes sexual harassment via electronic technology and social networking sites. The current study aimed to qualitatively describe experiences of cyber sexual harassment (CSH), as well as its effects, [...] Read more.
Background: Research efforts are increasingly recognizing young girls’ experiences of technology facilitated sexual harassment, which includes sexual harassment via electronic technology and social networking sites. The current study aimed to qualitatively describe experiences of cyber sexual harassment (CSH), as well as its effects, among a sample of sexually active adolescent girls. Methods: Qualitative interviews (n = 25) were conducted among a sub-group of adolescent girls at risk for CSH (those who reported experiencing sexual or dating violence) who participated in a larger cross-sectional clinic-based study on sexual health. Participants were asked to describe their experiences or peers’ experiences of CSH. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and a thematic analysis approach was used to analyze qualitative findings. Results: Participants reported experiencing several different types of CSH, including (a) being forced or pressured to send sexual photos, (b) receiving unwanted sexual messages/photos, and (c) having sexual photos posted or shared without the sender’s permission. Findings also highlighted the consequences of experiencing CSH, including social isolation and negative effects on girls’ education. Conclusions: These scenarios of CSH described by participants highlight the multiple ways in which girls experience CSH. Our findings begin to inform the development of quantitative survey measures that reflect these specific types of CSH experiences reported by adolescents. The consistent use of such measures will be critical to establish the prevalence and consequences of CSH in future studies on this topic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Equity and Girls’ Health)
2 pages, 182 KiB  
Editorial
Acknowledgment to the Reviewers of Adolescents in 2022
by Adolescents Editorial Office
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 82-83; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010006 - 17 Jan 2023
Viewed by 979
Abstract
High-quality academic publishing is built on rigorous peer review [...] Full article
10 pages, 265 KiB  
Article
Multi-Level Protective and Risk Factors Longitudinally Associated with Dating Violence Perpetration among Non-Urban Mexican-American Adolescents
by Sabrina C. Boyce, Julianna Deardorff, Linda McGlone and Alexandra M. Minnis
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 72-81; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010005 - 30 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1824
Abstract
To assess the longitudinal relationship between individual and interpersonal risk and protective factors and dating violence perpetration among non-urban Mexican-American youth. With data from a 24-month prospective cohort study (2015–2019; baseline recruitment spanned from 2015–2017; four follow-up interviews every 6 months) of Mexican-American [...] Read more.
To assess the longitudinal relationship between individual and interpersonal risk and protective factors and dating violence perpetration among non-urban Mexican-American youth. With data from a 24-month prospective cohort study (2015–2019; baseline recruitment spanned from 2015–2017; four follow-up interviews every 6 months) of Mexican-American youth (8th grade at baseline) living in an agricultural region (Salinas, California), we utilized multivariable modified Poisson general estimating equations stratified by gender (n = 489) to assess the relationships of religiosity, non-violent problem-solving skills, school connectedness, family cohesion, and bullying victimization with dating violence perpetration. Among girls, but not boys, non-violent problem-solving skills [adjusted relative risk (ARR): 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56–0.99] and family cohesion (ARR: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.48–0.97) were negatively associated with dating violence perpetration, and frequency of bullying victimization was positively associated (ARR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.37–2.59). Non-urban Mexican-American female youth may benefit from multi-level dating violence prevention that strengthens family cohesion by building upon the Mexican-American cultural value of familismo and addresses common risk factors for bullying and dating violence perpetration. Additionally, results affirm etiological differences between girls’ and boys’ dating violence perpetration and the need for improved measurement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Collection Featured Research in Adolescent Health)
12 pages, 248 KiB  
Article
Adolescent Girls’ Experiences Regarding Teenage Pregnancy in the Rural Villages of Limpopo Province, South Africa
by Patrone Rebecca Risenga and Sheillah Hlamalani Mboweni
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 60-71; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010004 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 5579
Abstract
Every year, 7.3 million girls become pregnant before they turn 18. Teenage pregnancy increases when girls are denied the right to make decisions about their sexual health and well-being, which is a gender equality issue. Among the challenges of gender equality are those [...] Read more.
Every year, 7.3 million girls become pregnant before they turn 18. Teenage pregnancy increases when girls are denied the right to make decisions about their sexual health and well-being, which is a gender equality issue. Among the challenges of gender equality are those expectations that communities have about girls and early motherhood, sexual violence, and rape. Another challenge is the early marriages of children to older men coupled with the unique risks faced by these girls during pregnancy, for example, the interruption of their education, health risks, such as HIV, premature birth, and increased maternal mortality, denying the girls the right to live a healthy life. This study sought to explore the experiences of adolescent girls regarding teenage pregnancy in the rural villages of the Mopani District, Limpopo. A descriptive, explorative, and qualitative design was followed to collect data from 20 pregnant teenagers in a 13–19 years-old age group. A nonprobability purposive sampling method was used to select the participants from the three villages of the Mopani District. The data were collected using an in-depth individual interview. Tesch’s eight steps of data analysis were also applied. The study findings reveal several factors that explain the high rates of teenage pregnancy in rural Limpopo. Among these are the socioeconomic and cultural factors that predispose teens to pregnancy. The consequences of teenage pregnancy were expressed in terms of regret and ill health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Equity and Girls’ Health)
19 pages, 565 KiB  
Article
Interconnections between Emotion Recognition, Self-Processes and Psychological Well-Being in Adolescents
by Meghan L. Maynard, Shanel Quenneville, Kristina Hinves, Victoria Talwar and Sandra L. Bosacki
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 41-59; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010003 - 23 Dec 2022
Viewed by 2838
Abstract
Background: Adolescence is a critical developmental period for mentalization and emotion regulation skills. Studies show that during this time, adolescents may experience greater vulnerability to challenges of mental and emotional well-being. Studies also show that self-skills, such as mentalization, self-compassion, and self-control are [...] Read more.
Background: Adolescence is a critical developmental period for mentalization and emotion regulation skills. Studies show that during this time, adolescents may experience greater vulnerability to challenges of mental and emotional well-being. Studies also show that self-skills, such as mentalization, self-compassion, and self-control are independently associated with feelings of global self-worth or psychological well-being. To date, no known studies have explored interconnected relations among these self-skills, despite significant overlaps in the social-biological development of these skills. Aims: To investigate interconnected relations among psychological well-being, mentalization, self-compassion and self-control. Gender differences in these relations are explored. Method: As part of a larger, longitudinal study of adolescent well-being, this cross-sectional study drew on a variety of self-report measures, investigating relations among adolescents’ self-reports of psychological well-being, emotion recognition, self-control, and self-compassion. Participants consisted of 88 girls and 57 boys, mean age 13.38. Results: Main results showed associations among emotion recognition, self-control and self-compassion and feelings of global self-worth. Specifically, results showed that understanding negative emotions in others relates to lower levels of self-compassion and feelings of self-worth. Further, adolescents who report low levels of self-control reported uncompassionate self-responding and lower levels of self-worth. Gender differences and implications for further research and adolescent social-emotional interventions are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Collection Featured Research in Adolescent Health)
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31 pages, 4230 KiB  
Review
A Systematic Review Exploring the Psychosocial Factors Affecting Adolescent Access to HIV Treatment Services
by Tarique Variava and Jennifer Watermeyer
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 10-40; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010002 - 22 Dec 2022
Viewed by 4908
Abstract
Context: Despite the global realization that increasing access to antiretroviral treatment promotes significant bio-medical gains amongst adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV), the psychosocial impact of HIV on the health and well-being of ALHIV has been overlooked. Objective: To identify, synthesize, and [...] Read more.
Context: Despite the global realization that increasing access to antiretroviral treatment promotes significant bio-medical gains amongst adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV), the psychosocial impact of HIV on the health and well-being of ALHIV has been overlooked. Objective: To identify, synthesize, and discuss the psychosocial factors that affect ALHIV who are accessing HIV treatment services in South Africa. Data sources: Only empirical research published in English were searched for via four electronic research databases (i.e., ProQuest, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Sabinet Online) of the University of the Witwatersrand on 1 August 2020. Eligibility criteria: Full-text articles published in English were included in the sample on the following basis: (1) the identified studies included HIV-positive adolescents (10 years old and 19 years old) residing in South Africa; (2) the phenomena under investigation within the identified studies related to psychosocial factors which affect ALHIV accessing HIV treatment services in South Africa; (3) measures exploring any form of psychosocial factors associated with ALHIV in South Africa that had to be utilized; (4) study research designs were either an observational or cohort study; (5) studies were of a quantitative or qualitative nature, and (6) studies ought to have been published between 1 January 2000 and 31 July 2020. Data extraction: Data from the articles included in this systematic review were extracted using predefined data fields, including study quality indicators. Data synthesis: A total of 18 empirical articles met the inclusion criteria informing this research report. From the articles included in this systematic review, it was evident that ALHIV accessing HIV treatment services in South Africa were impacted by seven major psychosocial factors. Specifically, this included their (1) psychosocial development, (2) quality of life, (3) experience of adversity, (4) availability of social support, (5) experience of HIV stigma, (6) HIV status disclosure, and (7) adherence to ART. Conclusions: The physiological, social, behavioural, and cognitive functioning of ALHIV accessing HIV treatment services predisposed them to psychosocial distress, which in turn had implications for their health and well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Adolescent Health and Mental Health)
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9 pages, 229 KiB  
Brief Report
Levels and Pattern of Alcohol Consumption among Adolescents in Bolivia: A National Cross-Sectional Survey in 2018
by Esther Luwedde and Karl Peltzer
Adolescents 2023, 3(1), 1-9; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents3010001 - 21 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1531
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of four alcohol use indicators among male and female school adolescents in Bolivia. In total, 7931 participants (M = 15.5 years, SD = 1.6) responded to a questionnaire in a [...] Read more.
The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of four alcohol use indicators among male and female school adolescents in Bolivia. In total, 7931 participants (M = 15.5 years, SD = 1.6) responded to a questionnaire in a cross-sectional nationally representative school survey in Bolivia in 2018. The proportion of current alcohol use was 26.4%, heavy alcohol use 11.1%, ever having been drunk 24.1%, and trouble resulting from alcohol use 21.4%. Among boys, older age, current cannabis use, multiple sexual partners, being in a physical fight, school truancy, soft drink intake, injury and psychological distress increased the risk of current alcohol use and/or heavy drinking. Among girls, older age, multiple sexual partners, fast food intake, being in a physical fight, school truancy, sedentary behaviour and psychological distress increased the risk of current alcohol use and/or heavy drinking. Older age, multiple sexual partners, current cannabis use, low parental support and school truancy were associated with trouble from alcohol use and history of intoxication in both sexes. Among boys, ever having used amphetamines, fast food intake, injury, peer support, and being in a physical fight were associated with ever having been drunk; and among girls, sedentary behaviour and psychological distress increased the odds of ever having been drunk. The study found that more than one in ten adolescents engage in heavy alcohol use, and several sex specific factors are identified for four alcohol use indicators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Collection Featured Research in Adolescent Health)
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