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Article

Effect of Dietary Brown Seaweed (Macrocystis pyrifera) Additive on Meat Quality and Nutrient Composition of Fattening Pigs

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Instituto de Ciencia Animal, Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 5090000, Chile
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Escuela de Graduados, Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 5090000, Chile
3
I+D Patagonia Biotecnología SA., Valdivia 5090000, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Nelson O. Huerta-Leidenz, Markus F. Mille and Juana Fernández-López
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1720; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081720
Received: 4 May 2021 / Revised: 19 July 2021 / Accepted: 20 July 2021 / Published: 26 July 2021
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary brown seaweed (Macrocystis pyrifera) additive (SWA) on meat quality and nutrient composition of commercial fattening pigs. The treatments were: Regular diet with 0% inclusion of SWA (CON); Regular diet with 2% SWA (2%-SWA); Regular diet with 4% SWA (4%-SWA). After slaughtering, five carcasses from each group were selected, and longissimus lumborum (LL) samples were taken for meat quality and chemical composition analysis. Meat quality traits (except redness intensity) were not affected (p > 0.05) by treatments. Samples from the 4%-SWA treatment showed the lowest a value than those from the 2%-SWA and CON treatments (p = 0.05). Meat samples from the 4%-SWA group contained 3.37 and 3.81 mg/100 g more of muscle cholesterol than CON and 2% SWA groups, respectively (p < 0.05). The SWA treatments affected (p ≤ 0.05) the content of ash, Mn, Fe, and Cu. The LL samples from 4%-SWA had the highest content of ash; however, they showed 0.13, 0.45, and 0.23 less mg/100 g of Mn, Fe, and Zn, respectively, compared to samples from CON (p ≤ 0.05). Fatty acids composition and macro minerals content (Na, Mg, and K) did not show variation due to the SWA treatments. Further studies are needed to understand the biological effects of these components on adipogenesis, cholesterol metabolism, and mineral deposition in muscle. View Full-Text
Keywords: pig; seaweed; pork quality; fatty acids; minerals; proximal composition; Macrocystis pyrifera pig; seaweed; pork quality; fatty acids; minerals; proximal composition; Macrocystis pyrifera
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jerez-Timaure, N.; Sánchez-Hidalgo, M.; Pulido, R.; Mendoza, J. Effect of Dietary Brown Seaweed (Macrocystis pyrifera) Additive on Meat Quality and Nutrient Composition of Fattening Pigs. Foods 2021, 10, 1720. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081720

AMA Style

Jerez-Timaure N, Sánchez-Hidalgo M, Pulido R, Mendoza J. Effect of Dietary Brown Seaweed (Macrocystis pyrifera) Additive on Meat Quality and Nutrient Composition of Fattening Pigs. Foods. 2021; 10(8):1720. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081720

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jerez-Timaure, Nancy, Melissa Sánchez-Hidalgo, Rubén Pulido, and Jonathan Mendoza. 2021. "Effect of Dietary Brown Seaweed (Macrocystis pyrifera) Additive on Meat Quality and Nutrient Composition of Fattening Pigs" Foods 10, no. 8: 1720. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081720

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