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Publications, Volume 7, Issue 4 (December 2019) – 8 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): This article looks at the challenges faced by open access (OA) university presses throughout the publishing journey and considers ways in which these challenges can be addressed. In particular, the article focuses on six key stages throughout the lifecycle of an open access publication: commissioning; review; production; discoverability; marketing; analytics. Approached from the point of view of the University of Huddersfield Press, this article also draws on discussions and experiences of other NUPs from community-led forums and events. View this paper.
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Commentary
Between Innovation and Standardization, Is There Still a Room for Scientific Reports? The Rise of a Formatting Tradition in Periodontal Research
Publications 2019, 7(4), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7040067 - 17 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1170
Abstract
Everybody, regardless of their role, is aware that biomedical research is rapidly evolving, and the demand for reproducibility is increasing together with the amount of novel information. “Before reproducibility must come pre-producibility” “Checklists work to improve science”, just to quote some of the [...] Read more.
Everybody, regardless of their role, is aware that biomedical research is rapidly evolving, and the demand for reproducibility is increasing together with the amount of novel information. “Before reproducibility must come pre-producibility” “Checklists work to improve science”, just to quote some of the articles querying how to find a new bridge between ethics in science and the urgency for publishing. Looking for papers on anti-inflammatory compounds in periodontics, we came across a significant number of articles that could be considered a prototype of a consistent study format. The literature on the testing of active compounds on lipopolysaccharides- (LPS)-induced inflammation in gingival fibroblasts was searched to identify studies that followed a consistent format, to better understand their similarities and assess the appropriateness of their methods. Several studies were identified with a degree of similarity in their methods and formatting that was so high that it was possible to rule out that it was due to chance, and a format template common to these studies was outlined. Although this was most likely beyond the intentions of their authors, these studies may pose the basis for an in-vitro testing standard for anti-inflammatory compounds; however, the dangers of acritical uniformity are also apparent. Full article
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Article
Does Academic Publishing Lead to Work-Related Stress or Happiness?
Publications 2019, 7(4), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7040066 - 27 Nov 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1842
Abstract
The topic of work-related stress and happiness has recently been of interest to science as well as in practice. Work-related stress has negative effects on workers, organizations, and the whole of society, whereas happiness has positive effects. It is therefore important to monitor [...] Read more.
The topic of work-related stress and happiness has recently been of interest to science as well as in practice. Work-related stress has negative effects on workers, organizations, and the whole of society, whereas happiness has positive effects. It is therefore important to monitor the wellbeing of workers. This article deals with stress and happiness as related to academic publishing. To answer the research question of whether academic publishing leads to stress or happiness, a narrative analysis was conducted. Narratives from ten Czech academics were collected and analyzed with the use of a categorical-content approach. The categories used are the general causes of work-related stress and happiness as identified in the literature: work overload, ambiguity, conflict, the sense of meaningful work, job satisfaction, and affective organizational commitment. It was found that academic publishing leads to both work-related stress and happiness. However, stress is more prevalent. Not only do academics experience all the general causes of work-related stress, unfortunately they often lack the sources of happiness. Many specific causes of stress and happiness, as well as unhappiness, were discovered in the narratives. Several ways to improve the situation have been suggested. Refining policies in human resources is particularly important if universities wish to retain their academics. Full article
Article
Open Science in the Humanities, or: Open Humanities?
Publications 2019, 7(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7040065 - 19 Nov 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5438
Abstract
Open science refers to both the practices and norms of more open and transparent communication and research in scientific disciplines and the discourse on these practices and norms. There is no such discourse dedicated to the humanities. Though the humanities appear to be [...] Read more.
Open science refers to both the practices and norms of more open and transparent communication and research in scientific disciplines and the discourse on these practices and norms. There is no such discourse dedicated to the humanities. Though the humanities appear to be less coherent as a cluster of scholarship than the sciences are, they do share unique characteristics which lead to distinct scholarly communication and research practices. A discourse on making these practices more open and transparent needs to take account of these characteristics. The prevalent scientific perspective in the discourse on more open practices does not do so, which confirms that the discourse’s name, open science, indeed excludes the humanities so that talking about open science in the humanities is incoherent. In this paper, I argue that there needs to be a dedicated discourse for more open research and communication practices in the humanities, one that integrates several elements currently fragmented into smaller, unconnected discourses (such as on open access, preprints, or peer review). I discuss three essential elements of open science—preprints, open peer review practices, and liberal open licences—in the realm of the humanities to demonstrate why a dedicated open humanities discourse is required. Full article
Article
Communication on the Science-Policy Interface: An Overview of Conceptual Models
Publications 2019, 7(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7040064 - 12 Nov 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1617
Abstract
This article focuses on scholarly discourse on the science-policy interface, and in particular on questions regarding how this discourse can be understood in the course of history and which lessons we can learn. We aim to structure the discourse, show kinships of different [...] Read more.
This article focuses on scholarly discourse on the science-policy interface, and in particular on questions regarding how this discourse can be understood in the course of history and which lessons we can learn. We aim to structure the discourse, show kinships of different concepts, and contextualize these concepts. For the twentieth century we identify three major phases that describe interactions on the science policy interface: the “linear phase” (1960s–1970s) when science informed policy-making in a unidirectional manner, the “interactive phase” (1970–2000s) when both sides found themselves in a continuous interaction, and the “embedded phase” (starting from the 2000s) when citizens’ voices come to be involved within this dialogue more explicitly. We show that the communicative relationship between science and policy-making has become more complex over time with an increasing number of actors involved. We argue that better skill-building and education can help to improve communication within the science-policy interface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Third Mission and Societal Impact)
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Article
Mapping the Publishing Challenges for an Open Access University Press
Publications 2019, 7(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7040063 - 11 Nov 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2833
Abstract
Managing a New University Press (NUP) is often a one-person operation and, with limits on time and resources, efficiency and effectiveness are key to having a successful production process and providing a high level of author, editor and reader services. This article looks [...] Read more.
Managing a New University Press (NUP) is often a one-person operation and, with limits on time and resources, efficiency and effectiveness are key to having a successful production process and providing a high level of author, editor and reader services. This article looks at the challenges faced by open access (OA) university presses throughout the publishing journey and considers ways in which these challenges can be addressed. In particular, the article focuses on six key stages throughout the lifecycle of an open access publication: commissioning; review; production; discoverability; marketing; analytics. Approached from the point of view of the University of Huddersfield Press, this article also draws on discussions and experiences of other NUPs from community-led forums and events. By highlighting the issues faced, and the potential solutions to them, this research recognises the need for a tailored and formalised production workflow within NUPs and also provides guidance how to begin implementing possible solutions. Full article
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Article
Third Mission as an Opportunity for Professionalization in Science Management
Publications 2019, 7(4), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7040062 - 08 Nov 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1324
Abstract
With the rise of the Third Mission of universities, the role of science management, which itself has been growing steadily over the years, is gaining relevance for organizational success. Science managers possess exclusive knowledge of organizational processes and keep their own external networks; [...] Read more.
With the rise of the Third Mission of universities, the role of science management, which itself has been growing steadily over the years, is gaining relevance for organizational success. Science managers possess exclusive knowledge of organizational processes and keep their own external networks; neither scientists nor university management can give up on successfully carrying out Third Mission activities, such as lifelong learning or student exchange programs. This study takes up the question of whether this exclusive knowledge of science managers fosters their institutional establishment as influential—and therefore, professional—actors. This leads to the research question: Which power resources are available and used by science managers in the relationships with scientists and university management? The theoretical approach builds upon power resources and micro-politics as the core explaining variables for influencing others. In this pursuit, case studies of four German universities with altogether 27 qualitative interviews were conducted with science managers, university management and scientists. The results show that science managers only partially experiment with tactics that entail more risk, such as barter trade or dominance and the most common strategy in relation to others is moderation by idealization or objectivity. In contrast to expectations, they hereby lean more often on internal than on external networks as power resources. In general, two patterns emerge from the analysis: One group of science managers that act managerial and wishes for more room for individual maneuver, and a second group that sees itself as a service provider with little self-interest and wishes for more rules to strengthen their position towards scientists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Third Mission and Societal Impact)
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Article
Perceived Challenges to Anglophone Publication at Three Universities in Chile
Publications 2019, 7(4), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7040061 - 06 Oct 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1664
Abstract
It is well documented that non-Anglophone scholars face enormous pressures to publish in peer-reviewed English-medium journals both for their own advancement and for institutional prestige. Yet many of them receive little support and face big challenges. Scholars’ perceptions of these challenges often differ [...] Read more.
It is well documented that non-Anglophone scholars face enormous pressures to publish in peer-reviewed English-medium journals both for their own advancement and for institutional prestige. Yet many of them receive little support and face big challenges. Scholars’ perceptions of these challenges often differ from those of applied linguists. This study analyzes publication challenges at three universities in Chile. Research questions included the following: How much pressure to publish do Chilean scholars feel? What do they perceive as their biggest challenges? Do these differ from perceptions of applied linguists? Data come from surveys involving 191 respondents conducted shortly after the author was an English Language Specialist for the U.S. Department of State in 2015. Surveys were administered both as personal interviews and online through SurveyMonkey. Identified challenges include language issues, workload, feedback and networking, and rhetorical structure. Suggestions are given for mitigating these challenges and for further research on these issues. Full article
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Article
Competence-Based Management Research in the Web of Science and Scopus Databases: Scientific Production, Collaboration, and Impact
Publications 2019, 7(4), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7040060 - 24 Sep 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1817
Abstract
This paper presents a bibliometric study, which seeks to characterize papers that address competence-based management and that are indexed in the Web of Science and Scopus databases in terms of scientific production, collaboration, and impact. All the papers published in journals or in [...] Read more.
This paper presents a bibliometric study, which seeks to characterize papers that address competence-based management and that are indexed in the Web of Science and Scopus databases in terms of scientific production, collaboration, and impact. All the papers published in journals or in conference proceedings that contained the terms “competenc* management” or “compentenc* based management” in their titles, abstracts, or keywords were analyzed. The results show that computational sciences, human resources management, strategic management, and industrial relations and labor correspond to the macro-categories that characterize competence-based management. This paper also indicates that collaborations between authors do not establish strong co-authorship networks. It also shows that the most cited papers were published in journals of different areas. It concludes that studies conducted in the area of competence-based management can be developed in a more assertive way if they take into consideration the context of the current state of research in this area. Full article
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