Next Issue
Volume 3, September
Previous Issue
Volume 3, March

J. Intell., Volume 3, Issue 2 (June 2015) – 2 articles , Pages 41-58

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Review
The C-Test: An Integrative Measure of Crystallized Intelligence
J. Intell. 2015, 3(2), 46-58; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence3020046 - 25 May 2015
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 5514
Abstract
Crystallized intelligence is a pivotal broad ability factor in the major theories of intelligence including the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model, the three-stratum model, and the extended Gf-Gc (fluid intelligence-crystallized intelligence) model and is usually measured by means of vocabulary tests and other verbal tasks. [...] Read more.
Crystallized intelligence is a pivotal broad ability factor in the major theories of intelligence including the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model, the three-stratum model, and the extended Gf-Gc (fluid intelligence-crystallized intelligence) model and is usually measured by means of vocabulary tests and other verbal tasks. In this paper the C-Test, a text completion test originally proposed as a test of general proficiency in a foreign language, is introduced as an integrative measure of crystallized intelligence. Based on the existing evidence in the literature, it is argued that the construct underlying the C-Test closely matches the abilities underlying the language component of crystallized intelligence, as defined in the well-established theories of intelligence. It is also suggested that by carefully selecting texts from pertinent knowledge domains, the factual knowledge component of crystallized intelligence could also be measured by the C-Test. Full article
Commentary
Zeroing in on the Genetics of Intelligence
J. Intell. 2015, 3(2), 41-45; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence3020041 - 20 Apr 2015
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6431
Abstract
Despite the high heritability of intelligence in the normal range, molecular genetic studies have so far yielded many null findings. However, large samples and self-imposed stringent standards have prevented false positives and gradually narrowed down where effects can still be expected. Rare variants [...] Read more.
Despite the high heritability of intelligence in the normal range, molecular genetic studies have so far yielded many null findings. However, large samples and self-imposed stringent standards have prevented false positives and gradually narrowed down where effects can still be expected. Rare variants and mutations of large effect do not appear to play a main role beyond intellectual disability. Common variants can account for about half the heritability of intelligence and show promise that collaborative efforts will identify more causal genetic variants. Gene–gene interactions may explain some of the remainder, but are only starting to be tapped. Evolutionarily, stabilizing selection and selective (near)-neutrality are consistent with the facts known so far. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence, Where to Look, Where to Go?)
Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop