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Adm. Sci., Volume 6, Issue 1 (March 2016) – 4 articles

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Open AccessEditorial
Entrepreneurship as Facilitator for Sustainable Development? Editorial for the Special Issue “Advances in Sustainable Entrepreneurship”
Adm. Sci. 2016, 6(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci6010004 - 18 Mar 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2168
Abstract
In his quote from the 1940s, Joseph Schumpeter highlights the enormous transformative potential of entrepreneurship.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sustainable Entrepreneurship)
Open AccessArticle
Is Self-Regulation Sufficient? Case of the German Transparency Code
Adm. Sci. 2016, 6(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci6010003 - 23 Feb 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2713
Abstract
The German pharmaceutical industry is stepping ahead with its implementation of a new transparency disclosure code for cooperation between pharmaceutical companies and health care professionals (HCPs) and health care organisations (HCOs). In Germany, this transparency code (“Transparenzkodex”) is applicable since January 2015, and [...] Read more.
The German pharmaceutical industry is stepping ahead with its implementation of a new transparency disclosure code for cooperation between pharmaceutical companies and health care professionals (HCPs) and health care organisations (HCOs). In Germany, this transparency code (“Transparenzkodex”) is applicable since January 2015, and data will be publicly available around mid-2016. No empirical work has been done that addresses the impact of the transparency code on cooperation between HCPs, HCOs and the pharmaceutical companies, including the possibilities of competitive analysis of the available data. In this paper, we interviewed experts from 11 pharmaceutical companies representing small, medium-sized as well as multinational corporations which represent 80% of the German pharmaceutical market. Besides interviews, the authors designed a game to evaluate possible financial investments in key opinion leaders. The market can be regarded as a zero sum game. By allowing public identification of such key HCPs and HCOs, the amount spent on them might increase and not decrease. In a way, the transparency code may foster more and not less spending; in our simulation game, the financial investment in marketing key HCPs and HCOs exceeded sustainable limits. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Administrative Sciences in 2015
Adm. Sci. 2016, 6(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci6010002 - 25 Jan 2016
Viewed by 1898
Abstract
The editors of Administrative Sciences would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2015. [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
The Dilemma of Incumbents in Sustainability Transitions: A Narrative Approach
Adm. Sci. 2016, 6(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci6010001 - 25 Dec 2015
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3558
Abstract
In the context of the larger sustainability discourse, “sufficiency” is beginning to emerge as a new value throughout Western societies, and the question asked in this article is: Can we observe and conceptually identify opportunities to link successful business strategies of incumbents to [...] Read more.
In the context of the larger sustainability discourse, “sufficiency” is beginning to emerge as a new value throughout Western societies, and the question asked in this article is: Can we observe and conceptually identify opportunities to link successful business strategies of incumbents to principles of sufficiency? Thus, how feasible is sustainable entrepreneurship for incumbents? In this paper, a conceptual approach is developed combining insights from sociology, transition research, management and sustainable entrepreneurship research with a focus on narratives as a translation mechanism in situations where tensions emerge between corporate narratives and unexpected societal trends, e.g., the emergence of sufficient lifestyles. It will be shown that even though these are still a niche phenomenon, a focus on corporate narratives is an important element in understanding the role of incumbents in transitions to sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sustainable Entrepreneurship)
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