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Open AccessArticle

Seasonal Abundance of Psyllid Species on Carrots and Potato Crops in Spain

1
Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Naturales y Agropecuarias, Grupo de Investigación Agroambiente y Salud-Microbiota Universidad de Santander, 680003 Bucaramanga, Colombia
2
Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias (ICA, CSIC), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), C/Serrano 115 Dpdo, 28006 Madrid, Spain
3
Agricola Villena, Carretera del Puerto, S/N 3400 Villena, Spain
4
Centro Regional de Diagnostico, Junta de Castilla y León, 37340 Salamanca, Spain
5
SASA, Roddinglaw Road, Edinburgh EH12 9FJ, UK
6
Department of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(9), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10090287
Received: 4 July 2019 / Revised: 29 August 2019 / Accepted: 2 September 2019 / Published: 6 September 2019
Psyllids (Hemiptera: Psylloidea) can transmit the phloem restricted bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso). In Europe, Lso causes severe losses to carrot and represents a threat to the potato industry. A rising concern is Lso transmission from carrot to potato and within potato, and this has driven the need for monitoring populations of psyllid species which could serve as vectors on both crops. This would provide a fundamental understanding of the epidemiology of Lso. Different sampling methods were used to survey populations of psyllid species in commercial carrot and potato fields in central and eastern mainland Spain from 2015 to 2017. Two psyllid species, Bactericera trigonica and Bactericera nigricornis were found on carrot and potato crops. In carrot fields the most abundant species was B. trigonica (occurring from crop emergence to harvest); whereas in potato crops the most abundant psyllid species was B. nigricornis. Depending on field location, the maximum psyllid populations occurred between June and October. Since B. nigricornis was found on both carrot and potato and is the only psyllid species able to feed and reproduce on both these crops in Europe, there is the potential risk of Lso transmission from carrot to potato. View Full-Text
Keywords: Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum; vector-transmission; Bactericera trigonica; Bactericera nigricornis; psyllid yellows; vector abundance; zebra chip; population dynamics Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum; vector-transmission; Bactericera trigonica; Bactericera nigricornis; psyllid yellows; vector abundance; zebra chip; population dynamics
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Antolínez, C.A.; Moreno, A.; Ontiveros, I.; Pla, S.; Plaza, M.; Sanjuan, S.; Palomo, J.L.; Sjölund, M.J.; Sumner-Kalkun, J.C.; Arnsdorf, Y.M.; Jeffries, C.J.; Ouvrard, D.; Fereres, A. Seasonal Abundance of Psyllid Species on Carrots and Potato Crops in Spain. Insects 2019, 10, 287.

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