Topic Editors

Laboratory of Biodiversity, Taxonomy, Phylogeny, Ecophysiology and Biotechnology of algae, Agro-Food and Agro-Environmental Research and Innovation Center and Miguel Hernández University (CIAGRO-UMH), 03202 Elche, Spain
Dr. M. Ángeles Muñoz Martín
Laboratory of Cyanobacteria: Diversity and Responses to Environmental Changes, Area of Plant Physiology, Department of Biology, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Dr. Elvira Perona Urízar
Laboratory of Cyanobacteria: Diversity and Responses to Environmental Changes, Area of Plant Physiology, Department of Biology, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain

Advances and New Insights into Diversity of Cyanobacteria

Abstract submission deadline
31 July 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 October 2024
Viewed by
2518

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacteria played a pivotal role in changing the composition of the Earth’s early atmosphere due to their ability to produce oxygen though the photosynthesis. Nowadays, cyanobacteria have an important role in the ecosystem as primary producers and as microorganisms that can fix the atmospheric nitrogen. They occupy a wide variety of niches, including extreme habitats such as deserts, hot springs, and/or polar regions, thanks in part to their ecological adaptation capacity. Furthermore, cyanobacteria show great morphological diversity, including unicellular species to multicellular filamentous forms with branching patterns. In recent decades, there have been great advancements in our knowledge about the diversity of cyanobacteria, with the description of the numerous genera and species using a combination of morphological, ecological and molecular methods called polyphasic approaches. However, there are still large gaps in knowledge regarding these microorganisms, especially in the biodiversity hotspots (regions with a high level of species diversity, many of them endemic), and the most distant regions and inhospitable areas on the Earth. On the other hand, we are in a time where climate change is affecting our environment (habitat loss, changes in geographical ranges, declines in abundance, etc.), which poses unknown challenges for cyanobacterial survival.

Aim: The aim of this Special Issue is to collect the recent findings on cyanobacterial diversity, from fundamental studies that help increase our knowledge of the world's cyanobacteria, especially in those environments less studied as hotspots or marine environments to studies for evaluating the effects of climate change on cyanobacterial diversity and their diverse responses for adapting to climate change.

Scope: For this Special Issue, we invite you to send original research papers concerning any aspect of cyanobacterial diversity using molecular techniques (from specific gene-based PCR, sequencing and phylogeny to metagenomics), metabolomic techniques that provide a snapshot of the diversity of natural chemical compounds in nature and especially polyphasic approaches, and combination of different methods to an improved resolution. We also wish to understand the effects of both climate change and human activities on the cyanobacterial diversity in diverse environments, paying more attention to the unique diversity of the dry regions of the world. Articles that examine adaptation mechanisms of cyanobacteria in extreme environments and ecophysiology studies will be also accepted. Moreover, we encourage researchers from related fields to contribute high-quality review papers highlighting the latest developments in their fields.

Dr. Esther Berrendero Gómez
Dr. M. Ángeles Muñoz Martín
Dr. Elvira Perona Urízar
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • taxonomic and functional diversity
  • extreme or understudied environments
  • biodiversity hotspots
  • climate change
  • cyanobacterial responses to environmental conditions
  • tools for monitoring cyanobacterial diversity

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Diversity
diversity
2.4 3.4 2009 17.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Life
life
3.2 4.3 2011 17.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Microorganisms
microorganisms
4.5 7.4 2013 15.1 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Plants
plants
4.5 6.5 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Water
water
3.4 5.8 2009 16.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Phycology
phycology
- - 2021 15.7 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Toxins
toxins
4.2 7.5 2009 18.4 Days CHF 2700 Submit

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
16 pages, 3538 KiB  
Article
Aliinostoc bakau sp. nov. (Cyanobacteria, Nostocaceae), a New Microcystin Producer from Mangroves in Malaysia
by Faradina Merican, Nur Afiqah Abdul Rahim, Syazana Zaki, Mohd Nor Siti Azizah, Paul Broady, Peter Convey, Billy Lim and Narongrit Muangmai
Diversity 2024, 16(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16010022 - 27 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1760
Abstract
A new microcystin-producing mangrove cyanobacterium, Aliinostoc bakau sp. nov., was isolated from a tropical mangrove in Penang, Malaysia, and characterized using combined morphological and phylogenetic approaches. Cultures were established in liquid media of different salinities (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 ppt). [...] Read more.
A new microcystin-producing mangrove cyanobacterium, Aliinostoc bakau sp. nov., was isolated from a tropical mangrove in Penang, Malaysia, and characterized using combined morphological and phylogenetic approaches. Cultures were established in liquid media of different salinities (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 ppt). Optimal growth observed at both 7 and 14 ppt was consistent with the origin of the strain from an estuarine mangrove environment. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene strongly indicated that the strain is a member of the genus Aliinostoc and is distinct from other currently sequenced species in the genus. The sequences and secondary structure of the 16S–23S ITS region D1–D1’ and Box–B helices provided further confirmation that the new species is clearly distinct from previously described Aliinostoc species. Amplification of the mcyE gene fragment associated with the production of microcystin in A. bakau revealed that it is identical to that in other known microcystin-producing cyanobacteria. Analysis of the extracts obtained from this strain by HPLC-MS/MS confirmed the presence of microcystin variants (MC-LR and -YR) at concentrations of 0.60 μg/L and MC-RR at a concentration of 0.30 μg/L. This is the first record of microcystin production from Aliinostoc species in tropical mangrove habitats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances and New Insights into Diversity of Cyanobacteria)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop