Special Issue "Innovative Methods and Applications of Stormwater Management"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 5062

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jens Tränckner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock, Germany
Interests: wastewater treatment; urban drainage; modelling; nutrient recovery; rural water management; integrated water ressources management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Jin Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Yangtze Institute for Conservation and Development, State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China
Interests: integrated stormwater management; urban diffuse pollution
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stormwater management from urban, traffic and commercial areas is a continuous challenge and comprises a wide variety of aspects. In the last two decades a clear paradigm shift from quick drainage to water sensitive design has taken place, aiming at maintaining a near natural water balance, reducing adverse impacts on receiving waters or integrating stormwater treatment as architectural multi purpose elements into urban planning. Related research ranges from improved analysis and modelling of stormwater, systems elements and processes to the development and assessment of technical solutions up to city planning and socio-economic consideration. Recently identified challenges like climate change, increasing inner agglomeration, emerging pollutants require deeper investigation and intensified attempts for long-term sustainable solutions. This also requires a thorough review of lessons learned, including operational, institutional and social issues.

The objective of this special issue is to compile innovative articles comprising the whole range of stormwater treatment and stimulate a cross-regional, cross-sectoral discussion on sustainable stormwater management. Submissions may cover the following topics:

  • Hydrology, Water balance
  • Hydraulics (e.g. urban flood control, interaction of urban drainage and urban rivers)
  • Stormwater composition as function of landuse and influencing factors
  • Stormwater treatment technologies (Design, operation, effectiveness, costs)
  • Stormwater impact on ambient water quality (analysis, mitigation)
  • Integrated waster sensitive regional and urban planning
  • Modelling and control
  • Economics
  • Social, legal, institutional aspects

Stormwater management on regional hydrologic scale is not focus of this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Jens Tränckner
Prof. Dr. Jin Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Evaluation of a Modular Filter Concept to Reduce Microplastics and Other Solids from Urban Stormwater Runoff
Water 2023, 15(3), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15030506 - 27 Jan 2023
Viewed by 283
Abstract
This paper describes an innovative Decentralized Technical Sustainable Drainage System (SuDS) concept, which is based on technical devices, such as sieves, sedimentation barriers, floating barriers and a magnetic module, which addresses, mainly, the fine matter. The SuDS is designed as a retrofit system [...] Read more.
This paper describes an innovative Decentralized Technical Sustainable Drainage System (SuDS) concept, which is based on technical devices, such as sieves, sedimentation barriers, floating barriers and a magnetic module, which addresses, mainly, the fine matter. The SuDS is designed as a retrofit system so that no costly and time-consuming conversion measures are necessary. Due to the possibility of free configurability of individual modules in the three levels, road, gully and drain, a novel solution approach is presented, which is not available on the market, for a reduction in solids in general and microplastics in particular. The retention performance of selected modules and their combinations is demonstrated by means of bench tests according to the test procedure of the German Institute for Construction Engineering (DIBt) for the evaluation of decentralized treatment systems. Four different rain intensities, from light to medium up to heavy rain, are charged to the filter modules. Collected and fractionated road-deposited sediment (RDS) was selected as the test substance (10 kg). Additional tests with tyre powder, PE pellets, cigarette butts and candy wrappers helped to make clear the filter process of the particulate matter. The retention performance was determined by the mass balance between the defined dosage and at the outlet. For this purpose, the total volume flow of the effluent was passed over a stainless-steel sieve with a diameter of 600 mm and a mesh size of 20 µm. For the test substance, RDS retention rates up to 97% were measured. Very fine matter, particularly, was technically challenging to obtain; < 63 µm up to 66% could be retained by the filter modules. Modules in the road space, such as porous asphalt or additional retention spaces, in the area of the curb as well as direct infiltration in the road drainage shaft are theoretically described and discussed. The outlook also addresses the potential of an intelligent network to reduce the input of pollution from urban stormwater runoff. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Methods and Applications of Stormwater Management)
Article
Flood Management with SUDS: A Simulation–Optimization Framework
Water 2023, 15(3), 426; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15030426 - 20 Jan 2023
Viewed by 399
Abstract
Urbanization and climate change are the main driving force in the development of sustainable strategies for managing water in cities, such as sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS). Previous studies have identified the necessity to develop decision-making tools for SUDS in order to adequately [...] Read more.
Urbanization and climate change are the main driving force in the development of sustainable strategies for managing water in cities, such as sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS). Previous studies have identified the necessity to develop decision-making tools for SUDS in order to adequately implement these structures. This study proposes a simulation–optimization methodology that aims to ease the decision-making process when selecting and placing SUDS, with the specific goal of managing urban flooding. The methodology was applied to a real case study in Dresden, Germany. The most relevant variables when selecting SUDS were the spatial distribution of floods and the land uses in the catchment. Furthermore, the rainfall characteristics played an important role when selecting the different SUDS configurations. After the optimal SUDS configurations were determined, flood maps were developed, identifying the high potential that SUDS have for reducing flood volumes and depth, but showing them to be quite limited in reducing the flooded areas. The final section of the study proposes a combined frequency map of SUDS implementation, which is suggested for use as a final guide for the present study. The study successfully implemented a novel methodology that included land-use patterns and flood indicators to select SUDS in a real case study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Methods and Applications of Stormwater Management)
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Article
An Evaluation Framework for Urban Pluvial Flooding Based on Open-Access Data
Water 2023, 15(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15010046 - 23 Dec 2022
Viewed by 692
Abstract
Identifying the location and estimating the magnitude of urban pluvial flooding events is essential to assess their impacts, particularly in areas where data are unavailable. The present work focused on developing and exemplifying a tool to evaluate urban pluvial flooding based on open-access [...] Read more.
Identifying the location and estimating the magnitude of urban pluvial flooding events is essential to assess their impacts, particularly in areas where data are unavailable. The present work focused on developing and exemplifying a tool to evaluate urban pluvial flooding based on open-access information. The tool has three separate submodules: (1) sewer network generation and design; (2) hydrodynamic model development; (3) urban pluvial flood evaluation. Application of the first two modules in two catchments and comparison of these results with real data indicated that the tool was able to generate systems with realistic layouts and hydraulic properties. Hydrodynamic models derived from this data were able to simulate realistic flow dynamics. The third module was evaluated for one of the study cases. The results of this indicated that the current approach could be used to identify flood areas and associated flood depths during different rainfall scenarios. The outcomes of this study could be used in a wide variety of contexts. For example, it could provide information in areas with data scarcity or uncertainty or serve as a tool for prospective planning, design, and decision making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Methods and Applications of Stormwater Management)
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Article
Generate_SWMM_inp: An Open-Source QGIS Plugin to Import and Export Model Input Files for SWMM
Water 2022, 14(14), 2262; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14142262 - 20 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1917
Abstract
SWMM is an open-source model and software developed by the US EPA for the simulation of rainfall-runoff and routing in water bodies, sewer systems and wastewater infrastructures. It has been applied in numerous practical works and research projects. For a new SWMM model, [...] Read more.
SWMM is an open-source model and software developed by the US EPA for the simulation of rainfall-runoff and routing in water bodies, sewer systems and wastewater infrastructures. It has been applied in numerous practical works and research projects. For a new SWMM model, objects such as nodes, links and catchments can either be drawn via SWMM’s graphical user interface (GUI) or specified manually in a plain text file in “.inp” format (“input file”). Since the required data regarding sewer geometries and river systems are usually available as spatial data in a GIS environment, there is a need for user-friendly interfaces for the model setup. SWMM contains neither an import function for geodata nor processing tools as provided in geographic information systems (GIS) such as the open-source software QGIS. Existing approaches were script-based or required commercial all-in-one products. We developed a free and open-source QGIS plugin to generate SWMM models from geodata and to import existing SWMM input files into QGIS. An application example is presented to demonstrate the basic features and usage of the plugin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Methods and Applications of Stormwater Management)
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Article
Field Application of Spent Lime Water Treatment Residual for the Removal of Phosphorus and other Pollutants in Urban Stormwater Runoff
Water 2022, 14(13), 2135; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14132135 - 04 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1029
Abstract
The threat of anthropogenic eutrophication and harmful algal blooms in lakes requires the development of innovative stormwater best management practices (BMPs) to reduce the external loading of phosphorus (P). This paper presents the findings of a 5-year study of a full-scale P removal [...] Read more.
The threat of anthropogenic eutrophication and harmful algal blooms in lakes requires the development of innovative stormwater best management practices (BMPs) to reduce the external loading of phosphorus (P). This paper presents the findings of a 5-year study of a full-scale P removal structure constructed in Minnesota, USA with spent lime drinking water treatment residual (DWTR), a by-product of water softening at a local water treatment plant. Influent and effluent water samples were collected by auto-samplers during 43 storm events during the growing season. Samples were analyzed for P constituents, heavy metals, total suspended solids (TSS), and pH. Toxicity of the effluent was assessed using Ceriodaphnia dubia. Flow-weighted removal effectiveness was calculated for each storm event. Overall, the spent lime DWTR reduced total P loading by 70.9%, dissolved reactive P by 78.5%, dissolved P by 74.7%, and TSS by 58.5%. A significant reduction in heavy metals was also observed. Toxicity tests indicated the aquatic toxicity of the effluent treated with spent lime DWTR was not different from untreated stormwater. This study provided long-term real-world data that demonstrated that a full-scale P removal structure with spent lime DWTR significantly reduced P and other pollutants in stormwater discharging to an urban lake. Therefore, spent lime DWTR, which is currently treated as a waste product, is a promising filter material for stormwater treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Methods and Applications of Stormwater Management)
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