Special Issue "Interactions between Water-Energy-Food and Land Use"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Steven G. Pueppke
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: water–energy–food; food security
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of the water–energy–food (WEF) nexus challenges scientists to treat water, energy, and food as interrelated components of a single system. In its ultimate form, the WEF system is global, but the practical level of analysis is usually a smaller ecosystem, in which water, energy, and food interact in complex, often poorly understood ways. Land is crucial for the functioning of WEF systems, and land-use can be modified in both beneficial and detrimental ways, as these systems evolve.  Modern technologies, especially those involving remote imagery and modeling, are revolutionizing our ability to establish baselines for land-cover and land-use, track changes over time, and assess the future systems consequences of the WEF decisions that are being made today. This Special Issue focuses on land and the WEF nexus.  We invite papers on any aspect of this relationship, but especially those that take innovative, system-wide approaches to understand how land-use influences and is influenced by the nexus. 

Prof. Dr. Steven G. Pueppke
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land use change
  • land cover
  • water-energy-food
  • ecosystems

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
An Integrative Framework to Control Nutrient Loss: Insights from Two Hilly Basins in China’s Yangtze River Delta
Water 2019, 11(10), 2036; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102036 - 29 Sep 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
Rapid economic development and population growth in China’s Yangtze River Delta (YRD) are exerting significant environmental pressure on the region’s land and water, especially in hilly areas where many drinking water reservoirs have been constructed. These areas, which are characterized by steep slopes [...] Read more.
Rapid economic development and population growth in China’s Yangtze River Delta (YRD) are exerting significant environmental pressure on the region’s land and water, especially in hilly areas where many drinking water reservoirs have been constructed. These areas, which are characterized by steep slopes and thin soils, provide critical services, including flood control, water resource supply, food production, and recreational opportunities for nearby highly developed and heavily populated areas of the delta. We contrast two of these areas—the well-studied Tianmu Lake watershed and the much larger Qiandao Lake watershed. Both face similar challenges from nitrogen and phosphorus pollution due to rapid socio-economic development, but differences in watershed size and distinctions related to political boundaries influence the range of approaches available to maintain water quality. We review experiences of controlling nutrient pollution in these watersheds as case studies, and based on that information, propose an integrated framework to minimize nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in similarly challenged watersheds. The framework, which is designed to be generalizable rather than prescriptive, emphasizes source control, delivery interception, and fate management of nutrients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between Water-Energy-Food and Land Use)
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