Special Issue "Remediation of Contaminated or Degraded Soil and Water Resources"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021) | Viewed by 4050

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Zhenli He
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Soil and Water Sciences/Indian River Research and Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL 34945, USA
Interests: soil biogeochemistry; remediation of contaminated soil and water; nutrient management and water quality; nanotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil contamination and water eutrophication have become a worldwide issue. Soil contamination by heavy metals and/or organic chemicals has resulted in decreased soil productivity and posed a threat to food safety and human health as well as food security. Water eutrophication causes water quality degradation and aquatic ecosystem dysfunction, thus impacting water availability, environmental quality, and community living standards. In recent decades, many efforts have been directed to understanding the mechanisms of soil and water contamination and remediation and developing strategies for remediating and improving quality and productivity of contaminated soil and water systems. This Special Issue on “Remediation of Contaminated or Degraded Soil and Water Resources” aims to provide a platform for soil, water, and environmental scientists to publish their new research findings (research articles) and provide insight and directions of research (review paper) in the increasingly important fields.

Prof. Dr. Zhenli He
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • heavy metals
  • nutrient management
  • physical
  • chemical and biological remediation
  • phytoremediation
  • soil pollution
  • water eutrophication
  • wetland management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Zeolitic Urea on Nitrogen Leaching (NH4-N and NO3-N) and Volatilization (NH3) in Spodosols and Alfisols
Water 2021, 13(14), 1921; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141921 - 12 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1199
Abstract
Global use of urea nitrogen (N) fertilizer is increasing, but N losses are still very high (40–70%). Zeolites have the capability of holding NH4+, thus reducing N losses when applied as a soil amendment. However, application of a large quantity [...] Read more.
Global use of urea nitrogen (N) fertilizer is increasing, but N losses are still very high (40–70%). Zeolites have the capability of holding NH4+, thus reducing N losses when applied as a soil amendment. However, application of a large quantity of zeolite is costly and inconvenient. In this study, zeolitic fertilizers were evaluated to select the best formulation with reduced leaching of NH4-N and NO3-N and NH3 volatilization in agricultural soils (Alfisol and Spodosol). The treatments included the following: T0 = control, T1 = urea fertilizer, T2 = zeo-urea (1:1), T3 = zeo-urea (2:1), T4 = zeo-urea (3:1), T5 = zeo-urea (1:2), and T6 = zeo-urea (1:3). Leaching was performed at 4, 8, 12, 19, 25, 32, 39 and 45 days after the soils were treated with the designated fertilizers, including control, and packed into columns. Leachate samples were collected after each leaching event and analyzed for the concentrations of NH4-N and NO3-N and the quantity of leachate. Ammonia volatilization was recorded at days 1, 5, 9, 13 and 20 of soil treatments. Results indicate that zeolitic fertilizer formulations effectively reduced N losses. NH4-N loss was reduced by 13% and 28% by zeo-urea (1:1) in Alfisol and Spodosol soils, respectively, whereas zeo-urea (2:1) and zeo-urea (3:1) effectively decreased NO3-N leaching in Alfisol. Volatilization loss of NH3 was reduced by 47% in Spodosol and 32% in Alfisol soil with zeo-urea (1:1) as compared with that of urea fertilizer. The results suggest that zeo-urea (1:1) is an effective fertilizer formulation for reducing N losses, especially in Alfisol, as compared with conventional urea fertilizer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remediation of Contaminated or Degraded Soil and Water Resources)
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Article
Adsorption Studies on Magnetic Nanoparticles Functionalized with Silver to Remove Nitrates from Waters
Water 2021, 13(13), 1757; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131757 - 25 Jun 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1130
Abstract
This paper presents a novel procedure for the treatment of contaminated water with high concentrations of nitrates, which are considered as one of the main causes of the eutrophication phenomena. For this purpose, magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with silver (Fe3O4@AgNPs) [...] Read more.
This paper presents a novel procedure for the treatment of contaminated water with high concentrations of nitrates, which are considered as one of the main causes of the eutrophication phenomena. For this purpose, magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with silver (Fe3O4@AgNPs) were synthesized and used as an adsorbent of nitrates. Experimental conditions, including the pH, adsorbent and adsorbate dose, temperature and contact time, were analyzed to obtain the highest adsorption efficiency for different concentration of nitrates in water. A maximum removal efficiency of 100% was reached for 2, 5, 10 and 50 mg/L of nitrate at pH = 5, room temperature, and 50, 100, 250 and 500 µL of Fe3O4@AgNPs, respectively. The characterization of the adsorbent, before and after adsorption, was performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Nitrates can be desorbed, and the adsorbent can be reused using 500 µL of NaOH solution 0.01 M, remaining unchanged for the first three cycles, and exhibiting 90% adsorption efficiency after three regenerations. A deep study on equilibrium isotherms reveals a pH-dependent behavior, characterized by Langmuir and Freundlich models at pH = 5 and pH = 1, respectively. Thermodynamic studies were consistent with physicochemical adsorption for all experiments but showed a change from endothermic to exothermic behavior as the temperature increased. Interference studies of other ions commonly present in water were carried out, enabling this procedure as very selective for nitrate ions. In addition, the method was applied to real samples of seawater, showing its ability to eliminate the total nitrate content in eutrophized waters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remediation of Contaminated or Degraded Soil and Water Resources)
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Article
Efficient Removal of Levofloxacin by Activated Persulfate with Magnetic CuFe2O4/MMT-k10 Nanocomposite: Characterization, Response Surface Methodology, and Degradation Mechanism
Water 2020, 12(12), 3583; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123583 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1228
Abstract
In this study, a magnetic copper ferrite/montmorillonite-k10 nanocomposite (CuFe2O4/MMT-k10) was successfully fabricated by a simple sol-gel combustion method and was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the Brunner–Emmett–Teller (BET) method, vibrating sample [...] Read more.
In this study, a magnetic copper ferrite/montmorillonite-k10 nanocomposite (CuFe2O4/MMT-k10) was successfully fabricated by a simple sol-gel combustion method and was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the Brunner–Emmett–Teller (BET) method, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For levofloxacin (LVF) degradation, CuFe2O4/MMT-k10 was utilized to activate persulfate (PS). Due to the relative high adsorption capacity of CuFe2O4/MMT-k10, the adsorption feature was considered an enhancement of LVF degradation. In addition, the response surface methodology (RSM) model was established with the parameters of pH, temperature, PS dosage, and CuFe2O4/MMT-k10 dosage as the independent variables to obtain the optimal response for LVF degradation. In cycle experiments, we identified the good stability and reusability of CuFe2O4/MMT-k10. We proposed a potential mechanism of CuFe2O4/MMT-k10 activating PS through free radical quenching tests and XPS analysis. These results reveal that CuFe2O4/MMT-k10 nanocomposite could activate the persulfate, which is an efficient technique for LVF degradation in water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remediation of Contaminated or Degraded Soil and Water Resources)
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