Special Issue "Monitoring, Modelling and Management of Water Quality II"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 4 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Matthias Zessner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Water Quality and Resource Management, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria
Interests: monitoring of emission pathways of nutrients and micropollutants; emission modeling; water pollution control; water quality and river basin management; regional nutrient management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Stephan Fuchs
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chair Aquatic Environmental Engineering, Institute for Water and River Basin Management, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
Interests: emission modeling; water pollution control; water quality and river basin management; wastewater treatment; centralized and decentralized sanitation systems; storm water treatment; reservoir management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Different types of pressures, such as nutrients, micropollutants, microbes, nanoparticles, microplastics, and antibiotic-resistant genes, endanger the quality of waterbodies. Evidence-based pollution control needs to build on the three basic elements of water governance: monitoring, modeling, and management (m3). Monitoring sets the empirical basis by providing space- and time-dependent information on substance concentrations and loads as well as driving boundary conditions for assessing water quality trends, water quality statuses, and providing necessary information for the calibration and validation of models. Modeling requires proper system understanding and helps to derive information for times and locations where no monitoring is conducted or possible; this can include risk assessment for exceedance of quality standards, assessment of regionalized relevance of sources and pathways of pollution, effectiveness of measures, bundles of measures or policies, and assessment of future developments as scenarios or forecasts. Management relies on this information and translates it in a socioeconomic context into specific plans for implementation. Evaluation of success of management plans again includes well-defined monitoring strategies.

After the great success of the first Special Issue “Monitoring, Modeling and Management of Water Quality” in the Water, we now offer a second volume focusing on this topic. For this Special Issue, authors are invited to publish more advances in monitoring, modeling, and management of water quality. We welcome submissions that either address new concepts and methods of water quality monitoring, new developments of modeling tools, or innovative approaches of exploiting those monitoring and modeling strategies for effective water quality management and, therefore, that contribute significant advances to the scientific literature.

Prof. Dr. Matthias Zessner
Dr. Stephan Fuchs
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • effectiveness of measures
  • scenarios and forecasts
  • socioeconomic context
  • sources and pathways of water pollution
  • system understanding
  • water governance
  • water quality statuses and trends

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Four Years of Sediment and Phosphorus Monitoring in the Kraichbach River Using Large-Volume Samplers
Water 2022, 14(1), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010120 - 05 Jan 2022
Viewed by 124
Abstract
Various sampling strategies come into operation to monitor water quality in rivers. Most frequently, grab samples are taken, but they are not suitable for recording the highly dynamic transport of solids and solid-bound pollutants. Composite samples reduce the influence of input and transport [...] Read more.
Various sampling strategies come into operation to monitor water quality in rivers. Most frequently, grab samples are taken, but they are not suitable for recording the highly dynamic transport of solids and solid-bound pollutants. Composite samples reduce the influence of input and transport dynamics and are better suited to determine the annual river loads. Large-volume samplers (LVSs) produce both a composite sample over a long period of time and an amount of solids which allows for further analyses. In the small sub-catchment area of the Kraichbach river in Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany) two LVSs have been installed to sample the river flow. The concentration of solids and phosphorus in the supernatant water and the settled sediment in the sampler have been determined and mean concentrations have been derived. Annual river loads were calculated in combination with discharge data from the nearby gauging station. Two sampling strategies of the LVS were tested and compared. For the first strategy, the LVS was used to collect quasi-continuous composite samples throughout the year, whereas, with the second strategy, samples were taken specifically for different flow conditions (low, mean and high flow). This study compares the advantages and constraints of both strategies. Results indicate that the first strategy is better suited to determine annual river loads. Quasi-continuous large-volume composite sampling is recommended for further monitoring campaigns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring, Modelling and Management of Water Quality II)
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Article
Use of Monitoring Approaches to Verify the Predictive Accuracy of the Modeling of Particle-Bound Solid Inputs to Surface Waters
Water 2021, 13(24), 3649; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243649 - 18 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 586
Abstract
For particle-bound substances such as phosphorus, erosion is an important input pathway to surface waters. Therefore, knowledge of soil erosion by water and sediment inputs to water bodies at high spatial resolution is essential to derive mitigation measures at the regional scale. Models [...] Read more.
For particle-bound substances such as phosphorus, erosion is an important input pathway to surface waters. Therefore, knowledge of soil erosion by water and sediment inputs to water bodies at high spatial resolution is essential to derive mitigation measures at the regional scale. Models are used to calculate soil erosion and associated sediment inputs to estimate the resulting loads. However, validation of these models is often not sufficiently possible. In this study, sediment input was modeled on a 10 × 10 m grid for a subcatchment of the Kraichbach river in Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany). In parallel, large-volume samplers (LVS) were operated at the catchment outlet, which allowed a plausibility check of the modeled sediment inputs. The LVS produced long-term composite samples (2 to 4 weeks) over a period of 4 years. The comparison shows a very good agreement between the modeled and measured sediment loads. In addition, the monitoring concept of the LVS offers the possibility to identify the sources of the sediment inputs to the water body. In the case of the Kraichbach river, it was found that around 67% of the annual sediment load in the water body is contributed by rainfall events and up to 33% represents dry-weather load. This study shows that the modeling approaches for calculating the sediment input provide good results for the test area Kraichbach and the transfer for a German wide modeling will produce plausible values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring, Modelling and Management of Water Quality II)
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Article
Large-Volume Samplers for Efficient Composite Sampling and Particle Characterization in Sewer Systems
Water 2021, 13(20), 2831; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202831 - 12 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 450
Abstract
The assessment of pollution from sewer discharges requires flexible and reliable sampling methods. The characteristics of the sampling system must be known to allow comparison with other studies. Large volume samplers (LVS) are increasingly used for monitoring in sewer systems and surface waters. [...] Read more.
The assessment of pollution from sewer discharges requires flexible and reliable sampling methods. The characteristics of the sampling system must be known to allow comparison with other studies. Large volume samplers (LVS) are increasingly used for monitoring in sewer systems and surface waters. This article provides a comprehensive description of this widely applicable sampling system, gives insight into its comparability to standard methods, and provides recommendations for researchers and practitioners involved in water quality monitoring and urban water management. Two methods for subsampling from LVS are presented, i.e., collection of homogenized or sedimented samples. Results from a sampling campaign at combined sewer overflows (CSOs) were used to investigate the comparability of both subsampling methods and conventional autosamplers (AS). Event mean concentrations (EMC) of total suspended solids (TSS) derived from homogenized LVS samples and AS pollutographs were comparable. TSS-EMC of homogenized and sedimented LVS samples were also comparable. However, differences were found for particle size distribution and organic matter content. Consequently, sedimented LVS samples, which contained solids masses in the range of 3–70 g, are recommended to be used for particle characterization. The differences between homogenized and sedimented LVS samples, e.g., the quality of homogenization and the stability of samples during sedimentation in LVS, should be further investigated. Based on LVS results, average TSS concentrations of 50–60 mg/L were found for CSOs from centralized treatment facilities in Bavaria. With a median share of 84%, particles <63 µm were the dominant fraction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring, Modelling and Management of Water Quality II)
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Article
Daily Variation of Lipid Regulators and Personal Care Products in a River Impacted by Domestic Effluents in Southern Brazil
Water 2021, 13(10), 1393; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13101393 - 17 May 2021
Viewed by 686
Abstract
In urban areas, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) play a major role in the water quality of rivers. The removal efficiency of emerging contaminants by WWTPs is strongly correlated with the type of treatment and the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the process, which [...] Read more.
In urban areas, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) play a major role in the water quality of rivers. The removal efficiency of emerging contaminants by WWTPs is strongly correlated with the type of treatment and the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the process, which can vary according to the volumetric influent flow of wastewater and occasional peak flows. This paper aims, for the first time, to assess the daily variation of lipid regulators and personal care products in an urban river impacted by domestic effluents. Samples were collected upstream and downstream of a WWTP. The concentrations downstream of the effluent discharge were higher than upstream, but they varied significantly during the day. Concentration peaks upstream of the WWTP were detected at 07:00, 15:00 and 21:00, while downstream of the effluent discharge, concentration peaks occurred between 13:00 and 19:00 and between 21:00 and 23:00. The highest downstream concentrations of triclosan and methylparaben (420 ng L−1 and 460 ng L−1) were 6.8 and 5.4 times higher than the lowest concentrations detected, respectively. These results show that in WWTP-impacted rivers, the time of the sampling has a great influence on the final results and conclusions of a monitoring study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring, Modelling and Management of Water Quality II)
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