Special Issue "Impact of Land-Use Changes on Surface Hydrology and Water Quality"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carla Sofia Santos Ferreira
Website
Guest Editor
Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society (CERNAS), Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: land degradation; soil and water quality; surface hydrology; nature based solutions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Zahra Kalantari
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Geography and Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: sustainable urban and rural development; climate change; water-related disasters and conflicts; adaptive land-use planning; nature-based solutions; and ecosystem services
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world is facing major challenges to cope with an increasing population and consequent need for food, water, biomass, and energy. Land-use changes driven by urbanization, intensive agriculture, and extensive conversion of native forest into commercial plantations induce changes in hydrology through modifications of soil properties and water fluxes. These changes affect water availability (e.g., floods vs. drought) and quality (sediment, nutrients, and pollutant dynamics), threatening human wellbeing and both terrestrial and aquatic environments. This Special Issue aims to provide an overview of the most recent research on the impacts of land use change on surface hydrology and water quality, and to discuss the current and future management and planning issues facing global changes. Examples of topics to be included are:

  • The impact of land-use mosaic on landscape connectivity (sources, delivery pathways and sinks);
  • Impact of distinct agriculture management practices on runoff, sediment, and nutrient dynamics;
  • The role of forest management on runoff and water quality;
  • Influence of urbanization type and its spatial pattern on flow and sediment responses;
  • Emergent contaminants in water and sediments within areas affected by human activities;

Improvement of spatial planning and water management to mitigate the impacts of global changes on water-related hazards.

Dr. Carla Sofia Santos Ferreira
Prof. Zahra Kalantari
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land-use changes
  • runoff processes
  • sediment dynamics
  • nutrient and contaminant fluxes
  • landscape connectivity
  • management
  • planning

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effectiveness of Nature-Based Solutions in Mitigating Flood Hazard in a Mediterranean Peri-Urban Catchment
Water 2020, 12(10), 2893; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102893 (registering DOI) - 16 Oct 2020
Abstract
Urbanization alters natural hydrological processes and enhances runoff, which affects flood hazard. Interest in nature-based solutions (NBS) for sustainable mitigation and adaptation to urban floods is growing, but the magnitudes of NBS effects are still poorly investigated. This study explores the potential of [...] Read more.
Urbanization alters natural hydrological processes and enhances runoff, which affects flood hazard. Interest in nature-based solutions (NBS) for sustainable mitigation and adaptation to urban floods is growing, but the magnitudes of NBS effects are still poorly investigated. This study explores the potential of NBS for flood hazard mitigation in a small peri-urban catchment in central Portugal, prone to flash floods driven by urbanization and short but intense rainfall events typical of the Mediterranean region. Flood extent and flood depth are assessed by manually coupling the hydrologic HEC-HMS and hydraulic HEC-RAS models. The coupled model was run for single rainfall events with recurrence periods of 10–, 20–, 50–, and 100–years, considering four simulation scenarios: current conditions (without NBS), and with an upslope NBS, a downslope NBS, and a combination of both. The model-simulation approach provides good estimates of flood magnitude (NSE = 0.91, RMSE = 0.08, MAE = 0.07, R2 = 0.93), and shows that diverting streamflow into abandoned fields has positive impacts in mitigating downslope flood hazard. The implementation of an upslope NBS can decrease the water depth at the catchment outlet by 0.02 m, whereas a downslope NBS can reduce it from 0.10 m to 0.23 m for increasing return periods. Combined upslope and downslope NBS have a marginal additional impact in reducing water depth, ranging from 0.11 m to 0.24 m for 10– and 100–year floods. Decreases in water depth provided by NBS are useful in flood mitigation and adaptation within the peri-urban catchment. A network of NBS, rather than small isolated strategies, needs to be created for efficient flood-risk management at a larger scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Land-Use Changes on Surface Hydrology and Water Quality)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Use of Straw Mulches to Mitigate Soil Erosion under Different Antecedent Soil Moistures
Water 2020, 12(9), 2518; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12092518 - 09 Sep 2020
Abstract
Straw mulch cover is one of the most important soil erosion control measures applied to reduce runoff and soil loss in cultivated areas. However, in developing countries such as Iran, without a clear tradition or knowledge about soil erosion control measures, the use [...] Read more.
Straw mulch cover is one of the most important soil erosion control measures applied to reduce runoff and soil loss in cultivated areas. However, in developing countries such as Iran, without a clear tradition or knowledge about soil erosion control measures, the use of straw mulch is rare, and its impact in the most extended crops is not well understood. We investigated the separate and combined effects of colza (Brassica napus L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), to mitigate the activation of soil loss and runoff in sandy-loam soils, under different antecedent soil moisture conditions, in a rainfed plot in Northern Iran. Under laboratory conditions, we used a rainfall simulator device. The experiments were performed by using a rainfall intensity of 50 mm h−1, with a duration of 10 min and an inclination of 30%, with three replications. These conditions were used to evaluate the soils under extreme meteorological and topographical conditions. Two types of straw mulch, colza and corn, separated and combined with three different cover levels (25, 50 and 75%) and four distinct antecedent soil moisture conditions (0, 15, 20 and 30%), were used. The results showed that the applied straw mulches had significant effects on the reduction of soil loss and sediment concentration, by almost 99%. The maximum reduction of soil loss and sediment concentration was observed for the treatments with 0% moisture and 75% of corn, colza + corn and colza, with a reduction of 93.8, 92.2 and 84.9% for soil loss, respectively, and 91.1, 85.7 and, 60.7% for sediment concentration, respectively. The maximum reduction of runoff was also obtained with 0% soil moisture and a cover of 75%, reducing 62.5, 48.5 and 34.8% for colza, colza + corn and corn, respectively. The corn straw mulch showed the highest effectivity on reducing soil loss and sediment concentration toward colza treatment. But the colza straw mulch showed the best results on reducing runoff toward corn treatment. We conclude that the application of straw mulch is affordable and useful in reducing soil loss and runoff, instead of bare soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Land-Use Changes on Surface Hydrology and Water Quality)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Water Level Decline in Lake Urmia, Iran, on Local Climate Conditions
Water 2020, 12(8), 2153; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082153 - 30 Jul 2020
Abstract
Lake Urmia in northwestern Iran is the largest lake in Iran and the second largest saltwater lake in the world. The water level in Lake Urmia has decreased dramatically in recent years, due to drought, climate change, and the overuse of water resources [...] Read more.
Lake Urmia in northwestern Iran is the largest lake in Iran and the second largest saltwater lake in the world. The water level in Lake Urmia has decreased dramatically in recent years, due to drought, climate change, and the overuse of water resources for irrigation. This shrinking of the lake may affect local climate conditions, assuming that the lake itself affects the local climate. In this study, we quantified the lake’s impact on the local climate by analyzing hourly time series of data on climate variables (temperature, vapor pressure, relative humidity, evaporation, and dewpoint temperature for all seasons, and local lake/land breezes in summer) for the period 1961–2016. For this, we compared high quality, long-term climate data obtained from Urmia and Saqez meteorological stations, located 30 km and 185 km from the lake center, respectively. We then investigated the effect of lake level decrease on the climate variables by dividing the data into periods 1961–1995 (normal lake level) and 1996–2016 (low lake level). The results showed that at Urmia station (close to the lake), climate parameters displayed fewer fluctuations and were evidently affected by Lake Urmia compared with those at Saqez station. The effects of the lake on the local climate increased with increasing temperature, with the most significant impact in summer and the least in winter. The results also indicated that, despite decreasing lake level, local climate conditions are still influenced by Lake Urmia, but to a lesser extent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Land-Use Changes on Surface Hydrology and Water Quality)
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