Special Issue "Effects of Climate and Environmental Changes on Landslides"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luciano Picarelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli, 81100 Caserta CE, Italy
Interests: slope stability; modelling slope stability; natural disasters; landslides
Dr. Guido Rianna
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Regional Models and Geo-Hydrological Impacts (REMHI) Division, CMCC Foundation Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change, 73100 Lecce, Italy
Interests: slope stability; hydrological modeling; water balance; evapotranspiration modeling; hydro-thermal modeling; landslides; evaporation; unsaturated soil
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate changes, whose effects have become increasingly evident all over the world, are expected not only to affect the frequency and magnitude of the weather patterns that can trigger landslides (and thus the hazard thereof), but also exposure (and thus risk) connected to changes in land use, which follow such phenomena. However, in spite of the severe weather events, which are already occurring around the world, the commitment of either the scientific community and policy-makers in facing the increasing risk of landslide appears still limited, especially if compared to the initiatives that are being undertaken with respect to other geo-hydrological hazards, such as droughts or floods, whose link with climate changes is even more evident.

The goal of this special issue is to collect useful contributions about the relations between weather impacts and landslides, stressing the role of climatic changes. Both data from experience and results of physically-based analyses about future scenarios will contribute to provide a useful framework to account for by stakeholders and policy-markers.

Prof. Dr. Luciano Picarelli
Dr. Guido Rianna
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • climate change
  • landslides
  • natural disasters
  • adaptation strategies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Influence of Regional Freeze–Thaw Cycles on Loess Landslides: Analysis of Strength Deterioration of Loess with Changes in Pore Structure
Water 2020, 12(11), 3047; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113047 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 542
Abstract
The loess landslide in Gaoling District of Xi’an, Shaanxi in China is closely related to the seasonal freeze–thaw cycle, which is manifested by the destruction of pore structure and strength deterioration of the loess body under freeze–thaw conditions. In order to study the [...] Read more.
The loess landslide in Gaoling District of Xi’an, Shaanxi in China is closely related to the seasonal freeze–thaw cycle, which is manifested by the destruction of pore structure and strength deterioration of the loess body under freeze–thaw conditions. In order to study the relationship between macro-strength damage and pore structure deterioration of saturated loess under freeze–thaw conditions and its influence on the stability of landslides, this paper explores the effect of freeze–thaw cycles on the strength of saturated undisturbed loess through triaxial compression test, and explores the micro-microstructure changes of saturated undisturbed loess through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This is to analyze the evolution of the pore structure and strength loss evolution of saturated loess during the freeze–thaw process, and to describe the freeze–thaw damage of saturated undisturbed loess through the change of porosity and strength deterioration. Then, the internal correlation expression between the porosity change and the strength degradation is established to realize the verification analysis of the test data based on the correlation model. The research results show that: (1) As the number of freeze–thaw cycles increases, the peak strength loss rate gradually increases, and the strength deterioration of saturated loess becomes more and more obvious. (2) The freeze–thaw cycle will lead to the development of pores and cracks in the sample, accompanied by the generation of new cracks, which will cause the deterioration of the pore structure of the sample as a whole. (3) The response of strength damage and porosity deterioration of saturated undisturbed loess is roughly similar under the freeze–thaw cycle. The change in porosity can be measured to better reflect the strength deterioration of saturated loess. Therefore, the change of pore structure of undisturbed loess under freeze–thaw cycle conditions is tested by field sampling and indoor tests to reflect the phenomenon of strength deterioration, thereby analyzing the stability of loess slopes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Climate and Environmental Changes on Landslides)
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Article
Future Landslide Characteristic Assessment Using Ensemble Climate Change Scenarios: A Case Study in Taiwan
Water 2020, 12(2), 564; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020564 - 18 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 967
Abstract
Affected by climate change owing to global warming, the frequency of extreme rainfall events has gradually increased in recent years. Many studies have analyzed the impacts of climate change in various fields. However, uncertainty about the scenarios they used is still an important [...] Read more.
Affected by climate change owing to global warming, the frequency of extreme rainfall events has gradually increased in recent years. Many studies have analyzed the impacts of climate change in various fields. However, uncertainty about the scenarios they used is still an important issue. This study used two and four multi-scenarios at the base period (1979–2003) and the end of the 21st century (2075–2099) to collect the top-ranking typhoons and analyze the rainfall conditions of these typhoons in two catchments in northern Taiwan. The landslide-area characteristics caused by these typhoons were estimated using empirical relationships, with rainfall conditions established by a previous study. In addition to counting landslide-area characteristics caused by the typhoons of each single scenario, we also used the ensemble method to combine all scenarios to calculate landslide-area characteristic statistics. Comparing the statistical results of each single scenario and the ensembles, we found that the ensemble method minimized the uncertainty and identified the possible most severe case from the simulation. We further separated typhoons into the top 5%, 5%–10%, and 10%–15% to confirm possible changes in landslide-area characteristics under climate change. We noticed that the uncertainty of the base period and the end of the 21st century almost overlapped if only a single scenario was used. In contrast, the ensemble approach successfully distinguished the differences in both the average values of landslide-area characteristics and the 95% confidence intervals. The ensemble results indicated that the landslide magnitude triggered by medium- and high-level typhoons (top 5%–15%) will increase by 24%–29% and 125%–200% under climate change in the Shihmen Reservoir catchment and the Xindian River catchment, respectively, while landslides triggered by extreme-level typhoons (top 5%) will increase by 8% and 77%, respectively. Still, the uncertainty of landslide-area characteristics caused by extreme typhoon events is slightly high, indicating that we need to include more possible scenarios in future work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Climate and Environmental Changes on Landslides)
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