Special Issue "Sustainable Water Management Strategies: Climate Change Induced Disaster Risk Reduction"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Bert Enserink
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Interests: public participation; policy analysis; scenario studies; policy analysis; scenario studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change is posing new and grand challenges to water managers. As uncertainty and variability will increase, weather patterns will change, and extreme weather events will occur more frequently, how do we develop and implement sustainable managment strategies? How do we reduce the impact of expected and unexpected events? How do we prepare citizens and societies for changes in their environment? How do we develop adaptive policies, take robust measures, and improve the resilience of the water system, its institutional arrangements, and societies if measures fail? These questions will be addressed in this Special Issue, which is focused on reducing the risks of climate change induced disasters. Papers explicating the wealth of methods and approaches for assessing climate impacts, and for developing adaptation strategies and preparing societies for the future, are sollicited. Practical applications and case studies are sought explicitly.

Dr. Bert Enserink
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adaptation
  • climate change
  • disaster
  • public participation
  • resilience
  • risk-reduction
  • social learning
  • water management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Disaster-Risk, Water Security Challenges and Strategies in Small Island Developing States (SIDS)
Water 2019, 11(4), 637; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040637 - 27 Mar 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2808
Abstract
Small island developing states (SIDS) are typically characterized by being environmentally and socio-economically vulnerable to disasters and climate change. Additionally, they often have limited resources for freshwater provisioning services. This article presents an assessment of disaster risk and water security-related challenges in SIDS [...] Read more.
Small island developing states (SIDS) are typically characterized by being environmentally and socio-economically vulnerable to disasters and climate change. Additionally, they often have limited resources for freshwater provisioning services. This article presents an assessment of disaster risk and water security-related challenges in SIDS focusing on three major dimensions: (a) how disaster risks are perceived and addressed in the SIDS context using a case study method, (b) analyzing the current status of water security in these regions using an indicator-based approach and (c) assessing gaps and needs in institutions and policies that can facilitate sustainable development goals (SDGs) and targets, adaptation and resilience building in SIDS. In this regard, information on all SIDS is collected to be able to distinguish trends in and between SIDS based on amongst others geographical location and characteristics. This synthesis noted two key observations: first, that in SIDS, the number of disasters is increasing at a higher rate than the global average, and that the frequency and intensity of the disasters will likely increase because of climate change. These combined factors will impact SIDS on the societal level and on environmental levels, reducing their adaptive capacity, resources, and resilience. Second, most SIDS are already water-scarce with low groundwater volumes. Because of increasing demand (e.g., population growth and tourism) and decreasing supply (e.g., pollution and changes in precipitation patterns) freshwater resources are becoming increasingly limited, often suffering from the spillover effects of competing and conflicting uses. Threatened ecosystems and limited economic resources further influence the adaptive capacities of communities in SIDS. In this light, key solutions to address disaster-risk and water security-related challenges can be found by sharing best practices and lessons learned—from examples of good governance, integrated policies, improved community-resilience, and capacity-building. Added to their fragile situation, SIDS struggle to find enough funding to put their development plans, programs, and policies into action. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Use of Non-Conventional Water Resources as a Means of Adaptation to Drought and Climate Change in Semi-Arid Regions: South-Eastern Spain
Water 2019, 11(1), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010093 - 08 Jan 2019
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 2133
Abstract
Drought is a climatic risk with notable repercussions on water supply systems. The aim of this study is to analyze the principal measures for management and planning implemented during recent decades in south-eastern Spain (Segura River Basin) to respond to drought situations, focusing [...] Read more.
Drought is a climatic risk with notable repercussions on water supply systems. The aim of this study is to analyze the principal measures for management and planning implemented during recent decades in south-eastern Spain (Segura River Basin) to respond to drought situations, focusing on the role played by non-conventional water resources (desalination and treated water). The results demonstrate that the study area (despite being one of the driest places of Spain) is less vulnerable to drought than regions with an Atlantic climate and greater availability of water. This has been possible thanks to the integration of non-conventional water resources as a means of adaptation to confront this natural risk, which is estimated to become more intense and frequent in the future owing to climate change. Full article
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