Special Issue "Institutions and Economics of Water Scarcity and Droughts"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Use and Scarcity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Julio Berbel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidad de Córdoba
Tel. +34957218457
Interests: agricultural and resource economics; water management; water policy; multicriteria decision theory; environmental policy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Nazaret MONTILLA-LÓPEZ
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Universidad de Córdoba
Tel. +34957218431
Interests: agricultural and resource economics; water management; water policy; water banks; economic models
Prof. Dr. Giacomo Giannoccaro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Science (DiSAAT), University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, via Amendola 165/a, 70126 Bari, Italy
Tel. +34957218457
Interests: agricultural and resource economics; food policy; water policy; groundwater; consumer acceptation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Integrated water resources management seeks an efficient blend of all available resources (e.g., fresh surface water, groundwater, reused water, desalinated water) to meet the demands of the full range of water users (e.g., agriculture, municipalities, industry, and e-flows). Water scarcity and droughts affect many regions of the world, and are expected to increase as a consequence of climate change and economic growth.

This Special Issue aims to attend to the following questions: economic effects of water scarcity and droughts, effects of water scarcity and droughts on ecosystems and public health, instruments to manage scarcity and droughts (e.g., water price, water markets, technologies, user-based reallocation, etc.), resiliency, adaptation to climate change, scarcity, and droughts. There is a need to enhance institutions in charge of allocation and re-allocation of resources when temporal (drought) or structural over-allocation arises.

Articles submitted to this Special Issue should address institutional policy tools to manage scarcity of water resources such as water pricing (as an instrument for re-allocation), water rights trade, water banks, water banking, user-based allocation, drought management plants, water use efficiency, desalination, and water reuse. The issue invites economists, social science experts, natural scientists, and engineers. Papers should deal with the conflicts and trade-offs between uses in scarcity context and the technical, economic, and institutional solutions available. Both conceptual/methodological and applied research papers are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Julio Berbel
Prof. Dr. Nazaret MONTILLA-LÓPEZ
Prof. Dr. Giaccomo GIANNOCCARO
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water scarcity
  • droughts
  • water policy
  • water allocation
  • water management
  • water conflict
  • water reuse
  • water use efficiency
  • desalination

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Insuring Water Supply in Irrigated Agriculture: A Proposal for Hydrological Drought Index-Based Insurance in Spain
Water 2019, 11(4), 686; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040686 - 03 Apr 2019
Abstract
In Mediterranean-climate regions, irrigated agriculture is especially vulnerable to the risk of hydrological drought and irrigators are particularly concerned about its negative effects. During a hydrological drought episode, irrigators receive insufficient water to meet their crops’ water needs, giving rise to the so-called [...] Read more.
In Mediterranean-climate regions, irrigated agriculture is especially vulnerable to the risk of hydrological drought and irrigators are particularly concerned about its negative effects. During a hydrological drought episode, irrigators receive insufficient water to meet their crops’ water needs, giving rise to the so-called ‘water supply gap’. In such circumstances, agricultural production and irrigators’ incomes are considerably reduced. In order to minimize the negative effects associated with water supply gaps, a new index-based drought insurance scheme for irrigation is proposed, linked to the variable ‘stock of water available in reservoirs’. The proposal, although tailored to Spain, could be easily adapted to other countries or regions because the features of hydrological drought risk are similar worldwide. It is expected that the proposed scheme will improve drought risk management in irrigated agriculture, stabilizing irrigators’ incomes and guaranteeing the sustainability of irrigated agriculture in the face of global change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Institutions and Economics of Water Scarcity and Droughts)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Dynamic Changes of the Baiyangdian Lake Surface Based on a Complex Water Extraction Method
Water 2018, 10(11), 1616; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111616 - 09 Nov 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
Lakes have an important role in human life and the ecological environment, but they are easily affected by human activity and climate change, especially around urban areas. Hence, it is critical to extract water with a high precision method and monitor long-term sequence [...] Read more.
Lakes have an important role in human life and the ecological environment, but they are easily affected by human activity and climate change, especially around urban areas. Hence, it is critical to extract water with a high precision method and monitor long-term sequence dynamic changes in lakes. As the greatest natural lake of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, Baiyangdian Lake has a significant function in human life, socio-economic development, and regional ecological balance. This lake area has shown large changes due to human activity and climate change. The change monitoring process of the water surface is of great significance in providing support for the management and protection of the lake. The Spectrum Matching based on Discrete Particle Swarm Optimization (SMDPSO) method is a new, robust, and low-cost method for water extraction, that has obvious advantages in extracting complex water surfaces. In this paper, the SMDPSO method was used to extract the water surface of Baiyangdian Lake by Landsat images from 1984 to 2018. This method has a good effect on complex water surface extraction with vegetation, shadows, and so forth, and the Landsat images have higher resolution and longer time series. The main contents and results of this paper are as follows: (1) We verified the applicability of the SMDPSO method in the Baiyangdian Lake using visual interpretation and correlation analysis. The relative errors between observed and extracted results were all less than 5% in spring, summer, and fall, and the correlation coefficient between the water area and water level was 0.96. (2) According to seasonal verification and comparison of the extraction results, the SMDPSO method was used to extract the water surface area of Baiyangdian Lake during spring of the years 1984–2018. Water area changes of Baiyangdian Lake can be divided into four periods: Dry period (1984–1988), degraded period (1989–2000), stable period (2000–2008), and recovery period (2008–2018). The water area reached a maximum of 280 km2 in 1989 and a minimum of 44 km2 in 2002. (3) The possible causes of the changes in the water area of Baiyangdian Lake were also analyzed. The changes were caused by climate and human activities during the first and second periods, but mainly human activities during the third and fourth periods. In fact, effective policies combined with water conservancy projects were directly conducive to improving or even recovering the water and ecological environment of Baiyangdian Lake. Considering its importance for the benign development of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region and the construction of the Xiong’an New Area, a policy is necessary to ensure that the lake’s ecological environment will not be destroyed under the premise of economic development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Institutions and Economics of Water Scarcity and Droughts)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Water Markets in the Western United States: Trends and Opportunities
Water 2020, 12(1), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12010233 (registering DOI) - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Efforts to address water scarcity have traditionally relied on changing the spatial and temporal availability of water through water importation, storage, and conveyance. More recently, water managers have invested heavily in improving water use efficiency and conservation. Yet as new supply options become [...] Read more.
Efforts to address water scarcity have traditionally relied on changing the spatial and temporal availability of water through water importation, storage, and conveyance. More recently, water managers have invested heavily in improving water use efficiency and conservation. Yet as new supply options become harder to find and/or appropriate, and demand hardens, society must consider other options to, if not reduce scarcity, minimize the impacts of such scarcity. This paper explores the role water markets are playing in addressing water scarcity in the American southwest: a water-limited arid and semi-arid region characterized by significant population growth rates relative to the rest of the US. Focusing on three representative southwestern states—Arizona, California, and Texas—we begin by highlighting how trends in water supply allocations from different water sources (e.g., surface water, groundwater, and wastewater) and water demand by different water users (e.g., agricultural, municipal, and environmental) have changed over time within each state. We then present recent data that shows how water trading has changed over time—in terms of value and volume—both at state level and sector level aggregates. We end with a discussion regarding some institutional adjustments that are necessary for water markets to achieve their potential in helping society address water scarcity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Institutions and Economics of Water Scarcity and Droughts)
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