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Special Issue "Agriculture Water Management and Water Saving Strategies"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Victoria González Dugo

CSIC - Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible (IAS), Cordoba, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: crop physiology; multi- and hyperspectral imagery; water status and irrigation scheduling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world population is growing and is expected to reach 9.1 billion by 2050. Agricultural production must adapt to this situation sustainably, which means an increase in total production and the improvement of the resource use efficiency. To date, agriculture consumes 70% of available fresh water and is still the most limiting factor under arid and semi-arid conditions. Moreover, climate change increases the uncertainties about water supplies and food production. Therefore, we should face the challenge of increasing agricultural production with a limited share of freshwater. The reduction of the non-consumptive and non-beneficial uses of water would increase crop water productivity. It would also decrease the yield gap, defined as the difference between actual and attainable yield. These objectives can be achieved by adapting the water management at the field level. We invite the submission of innovative papers for this Special Issue, which should be focused on the improvement of water productivity in any cropping system, from rainwater harvesting and water management in rainfed areas, to the optimization of deficit irrigation strategies on intensive cropping systems.

Dr. Victoria González Dugo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water productivity
  • water stress
  • crop management
  • deficit irrigation
  • crop production
  • irrigation efficiency
  • yield gap
  • rainfed systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Study on the Optimization of Dry Land Irrigation Schedule in the Downstream Songhua River Basin Based on the SWAT Model
Water 2019, 11(6), 1147; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061147
Received: 10 May 2019 / Revised: 24 May 2019 / Accepted: 27 May 2019 / Published: 31 May 2019
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Abstract
The optimization of irrigation schedules is of great significance for saving water resources and ensuring food security. For the downstream of the Songhua River Basin, the key growth stages of crops were determined by the coupling degree between the effective precipitation and crop [...] Read more.
The optimization of irrigation schedules is of great significance for saving water resources and ensuring food security. For the downstream of the Songhua River Basin, the key growth stages of crops were determined by the coupling degree between the effective precipitation and crop water requirement and the sensitivity indexes of the crop water production function. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to simulate 16 irrigation schedules in different scenarios. Taking four factors into consideration, Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP)-Gray Interconnect Degree Analysis (GIDA) was used to establish the optimal irrigation schedule. The results showed that the key growth stages of corn and soybean were vegetative, reproductive and pod formation, seed enlargement. Deficit treatments were beneficial to improving crop yield and WUE. The optimal schedules were: the corn was irrigated with four times in key growth stages, and the irrigation quota was 21 mm; irrigation occurred six times in both normal and dry year, with quotas of 84 mm and 134 mm, respectively; the soybean was filled with six times in key growth stages, and the irrigation quotas were 10 mm, 28 mm and 89 mm in wet, normal and dry year, respectively. The evaluation method of irrigation schedule provided a theoretical basis for agricultural management and planting in the basin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agriculture Water Management and Water Saving Strategies)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation and Optimization of Agricultural Water Resources Carrying Capacity in Haihe River Basin, China
Water 2019, 11(5), 999; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11050999
Received: 8 March 2019 / Revised: 13 April 2019 / Accepted: 25 April 2019 / Published: 13 May 2019
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Abstract
The shortage and uneven spatial and distribution of agricultural water resources has greatly restricted the sustainable development of regional society and economy. In this study, an improved five-element connection number set pair analysis model, which subdivides the same–different–opposite connection number in the set [...] Read more.
The shortage and uneven spatial and distribution of agricultural water resources has greatly restricted the sustainable development of regional society and economy. In this study, an improved five-element connection number set pair analysis model, which subdivides the same–different–opposite connection number in the set pair analysis theory to enhance the integrity and effectiveness of the original ternary connection numbers is constructed to evaluate the agricultural water resources carrying capacity (AWRCC) in the Haihe River Basin. Based on this evaluation result, an optimization model (AROL model) is proposed to optimize the effective irrigation area and groundwater exploitation to achieve a “better level” of AWRCC. The evaluation result shows that the current AWRCC of the Haihe River Basin is relatively low. The AWRCC in Shanxi, Inner Mongolia, and Liaoning is Level III and the current agricultural water resources are not overloaded but have little carrying potential. The AWRCC of Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, Henan, and Shandong are rated IV and overloaded, among which Shandong has the lowest comprehensive score and the most serious overload. The optimization result shows that the extraction and conservation of groundwater in most areas of the Haihe River Basin is unbalanced and the effective irrigation area needs to be increased. With different current conditions in different areas, the groundwater exploitation and the effective irrigation area is adjusted correspondingly. Among the areas, the adjustment of groundwater exploitation and the effective irrigation area in Hebei are the most significant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agriculture Water Management and Water Saving Strategies)
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Open AccessArticle
Improving Water Use Efficiency of Spring Maize by Adopting Limited Supplemental Irrigation Following Sufficient Pre-Sowing Irrigation in Northwest China
Water 2019, 11(4), 802; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040802
Received: 11 March 2019 / Revised: 3 April 2019 / Accepted: 12 April 2019 / Published: 17 April 2019
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Abstract
In order to improve the water use efficiency (WUE) of spring maize in northwest China, the irrigation strategy of adopting limited supplemental irrigation following a high quota pre-sowing irrigation was evaluated under field conditions in 2016 and 2018. There were three treatments (W1, [...] Read more.
In order to improve the water use efficiency (WUE) of spring maize in northwest China, the irrigation strategy of adopting limited supplemental irrigation following a high quota pre-sowing irrigation was evaluated under field conditions in 2016 and 2018. There were three treatments (W1, W2 and W3) differing in designed wetting depth (Dh) where soil water was replenished. Dh in W1, W2 and W3 were 0–40, 0–50 and 0–60 cm, respectively. The limited supplemental irrigation was adopted to improve soil water content (SWC) within Dh to field capacity (θFC) when SWC within 0–40 cm layer decreased to 60%θFC following a high rate of pre-sowing irrigation. Results showed that the smaller Dh was beneficial for improving root length density and enhance the utilization of water in subsoil. In both seasons, different Dh led to similar grain yields, which were comparable to the typical regional yield (14.3 t ha−1). The highest WUE (2.79 kg m−3) was achieved in W1 and was 13% more than the typical regional level of 2.46 kg m−3, implying it was adequate for achieving high yield and WUE to maintain SWC in 0–40 cm above 60% θFC with not replenishing soil water in 40–100 cm during the growth season after pre-sowing irrigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agriculture Water Management and Water Saving Strategies)
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