Special Issue "Advances in the Technologies for Water and Wastewater Treatment"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. JiaQian Jiang
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
School of Engineering and Built Environment, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, UK
Interests: development of chemicals and optimization of unit processes for water/wastewater treatment; nutrients removal and recovery from wastewater; degradation of emerging micro-pollutants; environmental remediation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With increasing global water pollution levels and more stringent regulations to manage water quality, innovative water treatment technologies have been sought to find solutions. This Special Issue of Water aims to provide a platform for worldwide researchers to disseminate recent scientific developments and technical solutions in the areas of water and wastewater treatment technologies. Authors are invited to submit original research and review articles focusing on this area. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Membrane separation in combination with other treatments that would achieve high-quality safe water with affordable cost
  • The novel technologies for monitoring and removal of emerging micropollutants in surface water and groundwater
  • New technologies to improve pre-treatment, recovery, and reliability of membrane desalination processes
  • Advances in the development of novel treatment technologies such as granular sludge, membrane-aerated biofilms, adsorbents, ion exchange, oxidants, etc.
  • Novel concepts to stimulate sustainable nutrient removal and resource recovery from wastewater
  • Innovative tertiary treatment technologies for high-quality wastewater effluents
Prof. JiaQian Jiang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pre-treatment, recovery, and reliability of membrane processes
  • Novel technologies for the removal of emerging micropollutants
  • Nutrient removal and resource recovery from wastewater
  • Innovative tertiary treatment technologies

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Operating Characteristics of Partial Nitrification by Controlling pH and Alkalinity
Water 2021, 13(3), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030286 - 25 Jan 2021
Viewed by 497
Abstract
In many experiments, a partial nitrification device is initiated with the use of highly active nitrating sludge because of the large number of nitrifying bacteria. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are more adaptable to low-dissolved oxygen environments than nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). NOB activity was inhibited [...] Read more.
In many experiments, a partial nitrification device is initiated with the use of highly active nitrating sludge because of the large number of nitrifying bacteria. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are more adaptable to low-dissolved oxygen environments than nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). NOB activity was inhibited when the dissolved oxygen (DO) levels were decreased, causing the nitrate-nitrogen concentration to gradually decrease in the effluent and the nitrite-nitrogen concentration to gradually increase, achieving the accumulation of nitrous nitrogen. In this experiment, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was used to suppress NOB activity at a given pH while maintaining DO at a very low level so that the ammonia–water reaction mainly occurred in the device, and then the mud and water separated. Compared with other experiments, this approach can occur in 25 days, and it runs stably for more than two months until the device closes when the ammonia-nitrogen concentration is about 170 mg/L. This experiment also compared the difference between the pH change at the beginning of the device operation and after the device was stable. In order to increase the efficiency of bacterial appreciation, supplementing NaHCO3 increased the HCO3 concentration by 300 mg/L on the 25th day. It was found that some nitrification reactions still occurred, but they were not enough to destabilize the device. The nitrosate accumulation efficiency still gradually increased, and the average nitrite accumulation efficiency was 87.25% after NaHCO3 supplementation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Technologies for Water and Wastewater Treatment)
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Article
Isolation of Efficient Metal-Binding Bacteria from Boreal Peat Soils and Development of Microbial Biosorbents for Improved Nickel Scavenging
Water 2020, 12(7), 2000; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072000 - 14 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 718
Abstract
Boreal peatlands with low iron availability are a potential, but rarely studied, source for the isolation of bacteria for applications in metal sorption. The present research focused on the isolation and identification of Actinobacteria from northern Finland, which can produce siderophores for metal [...] Read more.
Boreal peatlands with low iron availability are a potential, but rarely studied, source for the isolation of bacteria for applications in metal sorption. The present research focused on the isolation and identification of Actinobacteria from northern Finland, which can produce siderophores for metal capture. The 16S rDNA analysis showed that isolated strains belonged to Firmicutes (Bacillus sp.) and Actinobacteria (Microbacterium sp.). The culture most efficiently producing siderophores in the widest array of the media was identified as Microbacterium sp. The most appropriate media for siderophore production by the Microbacterium strain were those prepared with glucose supplemented with asparagine or glutamic acid, and those prepared with glycerol or fructose supplemented with glutamic acid. The microorganism obtained and its siderophores were used to develop Sphagnum moss-based hybrid biosorbents. It was showed that the hybrid sorbent could bind nickel ions and that the nickel removal was enhanced by the presence of siderophores. Bacterial cells did not have a significant effect on sorption efficiency compared to the use of siderophores alone. The microbial biosorbent could be applied in the final effluent treatment stage for wastewater with low metal concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Technologies for Water and Wastewater Treatment)
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Article
Study on Aeration Optimization and Sewage Treatment Efficiency of a Novel Micro-Pressure Swirl Reactor (MPSR)
Water 2020, 12(3), 890; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12030890 - 22 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 973
Abstract
This study developed a new type of micro-pressure swirl reactor (MPSR) for treating rural domestic sewage with variable water volume in northern China. The transformation of a traditional aeration tank to MPSR was mainly divided into three steps. Firstly, the aeration device was [...] Read more.
This study developed a new type of micro-pressure swirl reactor (MPSR) for treating rural domestic sewage with variable water volume in northern China. The transformation of a traditional aeration tank to MPSR was mainly divided into three steps. Firstly, the aeration device was installed on one side of the aeration tank. Secondly, most of the top cover plate was sealed. Finally, the liquid level-lifting zone was set to achieve micro-pressure. The study measured the flow velocity and dissolved oxygen (DO) distribution in the main reaction zone of MPSR, studied the effects of MPSR sewage treatment in continuous operation mode and sequential batch operation mode, and analyzed the main microbial species. The experimental results showed that a stable circular circle flow and a spatial DO gradient in MPSR were formed when the aeration rate of MPSR was 0.2 m3/h. Through the MPSR sewage treatment experiment in two operation modes, it could meet the current requirements of rural environmental pollution controlled in China. Analysis of the types of microorganisms showed that microorganisms with different functions gathered in different zones of the MPSR due to the different dissolved oxygen environment and water flow environment, which further improved the ability of MPSR to simultaneously remove nitrogen and phosphorus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Technologies for Water and Wastewater Treatment)
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Article
Effect of Wastewater Irrigation on Photosynthesis, Growth, and Anatomical Features of Two Wheat Cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.)
Water 2020, 12(2), 607; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020607 - 24 Feb 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1233
Abstract
The wastewater from the Razi petrochemical complex contains high levels of salts and heavy metals. In the present research, the effects of different wastewater dilution levels (0, 25%, 50%, and 100%) were studied on two wheat cultivars—Chamran and Behrang. The wastewater contained high [...] Read more.
The wastewater from the Razi petrochemical complex contains high levels of salts and heavy metals. In the present research, the effects of different wastewater dilution levels (0, 25%, 50%, and 100%) were studied on two wheat cultivars—Chamran and Behrang. The wastewater contained high levels of NH4+, NO3-, PO43-, and SO42-, and Mg, Ca, K, Na, Cu, Zn, Fe, M, and Ni. The toxic levels of mineral elements in the wastewater resulted in a significant decline in the K, P, Si, and Zn content of leaves. Irrigation with the wastewater resulted in a significant reduction in photosynthetic characteristics including chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm and PIABS), intercellular CO2, net photosynthesis, water use efficiency, and photosynthetic pigments. The reduction in photosynthesis was followed by a significant decrease in the carbohydrate content and, subsequently, plant height, leaf area, and grain yield. Increasing the wastewater concentration reduced leaf thickness and root diameter, accounting for the decrease in xylem and phloem vessels, the root cortical parenchyma, and mesophyll thickness. The bulliform cell size increased under wastewater treatment, which may suggest induction of a defense system against water loss through leaf rolling. Based on the observed negative effect of wastewater on physiology, morphology, anatomy, and yield of two wheat cultivars, reusing wastewater with high levels of total suspended solids and salts for irrigation cannot be approved for wheat crops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Technologies for Water and Wastewater Treatment)
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Review

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Review
Filtration Process and Alternative Filter Media Material in Water Treatment
Water 2020, 12(12), 3377; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123377 - 01 Dec 2020
Viewed by 975
Abstract
In drinking water treatment, filtration plays an important role in the multi-barrier approach employed for the removal of pathogens. The presence of suspended solids and other particulate matter in water increases the resistance of most microbes to disinfection. Therefore, high performance in the [...] Read more.
In drinking water treatment, filtration plays an important role in the multi-barrier approach employed for the removal of pathogens. The presence of suspended solids and other particulate matter in water increases the resistance of most microbes to disinfection. Therefore, high performance in the removal of particles achieved by granular filtration can increase the disinfection efficiency. Although sand is one of the major filter media, alternative media have been developed and used in recent years. In this review, the performance of alternative media is compared with traditional sand/anthracite for drinking water treatment. Advantages in the use of alternative media, especially glass media, have been found, including high filtration performance in removing residual particles and turbidity, minor modification requirements to the existing filtration configuration and slow head loss development. However, before the employment of them in industry, additional tests are recommended. In particular, full scale tests with variations in the operating conditions and analyses of pathogen removal should be performed. Moreover, this paper reviews the filtration processes and operating configurations which provide overall references to those who are studying and working in the field of water technology and treatment. In this paper, legislations/standards of safe drinking water are summarized as they are the driving force of developing new treatment technologies; mathematical modules for predicting the media filtration performance are briefed. Finally, future work on the application of alternative filter media is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Technologies for Water and Wastewater Treatment)
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