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Special Issue "A Systems Approach of River and River Basin Restoration"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Theodore Endreny

Department of Environmental Resources Engineering, SUNY ESF, Syracuse, United States
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 267-250-6141
Interests: hydrology; environmental resources; ecological engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

River and river basin restoration faces significant challenges: a) the restoration target is often unknown, and is not likely an initial or completely natural state, which remains poorly understood; b) restoration structures should provide multiple functions to benefit humans and biodiversity; c) restoration scale and complexity should consider local to basin-level issues; and d) restoration resiliency should handle uncertain future drivers and beneficiaries of river and river basin health. A strategy to restore dynamic and complex river and river basin ecosystems involves a systems approach. Based on a United Nations review of needs for river and river basin restoration, this Special Issue solicits contributions that advance knowledge in the following systems approach topics: 1) identifying, understanding, and working with the catchment and riverine physical, chemical and biological processes comprising river basin and river health and delivering ecosystem services; 2) identifying, incorporating, and involving socio-economic values and broader planning and development activities linked to river basin and river health; 3) addressing structure and function relationships at the appropriate scales to address limiting factors to river health; 4) setting clear, achievable, and measurable goals, framed (as much as possible) in terms of changes to ecosystem structure and function, the provisioning of ecosystem services and, where feasible, socioeconomic factors; 5) planning, implementing, and managing to provide resilience to a range of scenarios over time, including changes to climate, land use, hydrology, pollutant loads, and population, so restoration outcomes are sustained over the long term; 6) involving all relevant stakeholders in an integrated approach, addressing land and water issues, and involving interagency and community collaboration, to achieve the greatest benefits; and 7) monitoring, evaluating, adapting, and reporting evidence of river and river basin health, relative to goals, to guide restoration and adaptive management.

Prof. Theodore Endreny
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • integrated watershed management
  • landscape design
  • water and terrestrial ecosystems
  • eco-hydrology
  • structure function relationships
  • surface water and groundwater interactions
  • ecosystem services

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Functional Response to Streamside Fencing of Pastoral Waikato Streams, New Zealand
Water 2019, 11(7), 1347; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071347
Received: 20 May 2019 / Revised: 21 June 2019 / Accepted: 26 June 2019 / Published: 29 June 2019
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Abstract
In New Zealand, streamside fencing is a well-recognised restoration technique for pastoral waterways. However, the response of stream ecosystem function to fencing is not well quantified. We measured the response to fencing of eight variables describing ecosystem function and 11 variables describing physical [...] Read more.
In New Zealand, streamside fencing is a well-recognised restoration technique for pastoral waterways. However, the response of stream ecosystem function to fencing is not well quantified. We measured the response to fencing of eight variables describing ecosystem function and 11 variables describing physical habitat and water quality at 11 paired stream sites (fenced and unfenced) over a 30-year timespan. We hypothesised that (1) fencing would improve the state of stream ecosystem health as described by physical, water quality and functional indicators due to riparian re-establishment and (2) time since fencing would increase the degree of change from impacted to less-impacted as described by physical, water quality and functional indicators. We observed high site-to-site variability in both physical and functional metrics. Stream shade was the only measure that showed a significant difference between treatments with higher levels of shade at fenced than unfenced sites. Cotton tensile-strength loss was the only functional measurement that indicated a response to fencing and increased over time since treatment within fenced sites. Our results suggest that stream restoration by fencing follows a complex pathway, over a space-for-time continuum, illustrating the overarching catchment influence at a reach scale. Small-scale (less than 2% of the upstream catchment area) efforts to fence the riparian zones of streams appear to have little effect on ecosystem function. We suggest that repeated measures of structural and functional indicators of ecosystem health are needed to inform robust assessments of stream restoration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Systems Approach of River and River Basin Restoration)
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Open AccessArticle
A River Temperature Model to Assist Managers in Identifying Thermal Pollution Causes and Solutions
Water 2019, 11(5), 1060; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11051060
Received: 27 April 2019 / Revised: 12 May 2019 / Accepted: 15 May 2019 / Published: 22 May 2019
PDF Full-text (2899 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Thermal pollution of rivers degrades water quality and ecosystem health, and cities can protect rivers by decreasing warmer impervious surface stormwater inflows and increasing cooler subsurface inflows and shading from riparian vegetation. This study develops the mechanistic i-Tree Cool River Model and tests [...] Read more.
Thermal pollution of rivers degrades water quality and ecosystem health, and cities can protect rivers by decreasing warmer impervious surface stormwater inflows and increasing cooler subsurface inflows and shading from riparian vegetation. This study develops the mechanistic i-Tree Cool River Model and tests if it can be used to identify likely causes and mitigation of thermal pollution. The model represents the impacts of external loads including solar radiation in the absence of riparian shade, multiple lateral storm sewer inflows, tributaries draining reservoirs, groundwater flow, and hyporheic exchange flow in dry weather steady flows and wet weather unsteady flows. The i-Tree Cool River Model estimates the shading effects of the riparian vegetation and other features as a function of heights and distances as well as solar geometry. The model was tested along 1500 m of a New York mountain river with a riparian forest and urban areas during 30 h with two summer storm events in 2007. The simulations were sensitive to the inflows of storm sewers, subsurface inflows, as well as riparian shading, and upstream boundary temperature inflows for steady and unsteady conditions. The model simulated hourly river temperature with an R2 of 0.98; when shading was removed from the simulation the R2 decreased 0.88, indicating the importance of riparian shading in river thermal modeling. When stormwater inflows were removed from the simulation, the R2 decreased from 0.98 to 0.92, and when subsurface inflows were removed, the R2 decreased to 0.94. The simulation of thermal loading is important to manage against pollution of rivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Systems Approach of River and River Basin Restoration)
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