Special Issue "Water Quality Changes of Lakes and Rivers"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Katarzyna Kowalczewska-Madura
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Water Protection, Faculty of Biology, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznań, Poland
Interests: water quality; lakes and rivers; sediments; lake restoration; water management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The quality of waters (lakes and rivers) is one of the most important hydrobiological problems. Nowadays, attention is increasingly being paid to the quality of our waters and the various possibilities of their use. Different sources of water pollution (municipal and industrial wastewater inflows, agricultural and urban runoffs) and new pollutants are extremely important: antibiotics, hormones, painkillers and drugs. Their identification and effective removal are important for the functioning of water ecosystems and human health. There is growing interest among scientists in issues concerning not only the identification of sources of pollution and stopping the process of eutrophication of waters of both lakes and rivers, but also the possibility of improving their quality. Protective treatments introduced in catchment areas and restoration methods in water bodies are an area which is developing very fast. As research has shown, a very important problem related to water eutrophication is not only the external load of biogenic compounds from the direct and indirect catchment area, but also internal loading from bottom sediments. It is also important how the quality of river waters flowing through heavily polluted reservoirs changes. We encourage all the researchers working in this field to send us their manuscripts with the latest advances in this area.

Dr. Katarzyna Kowalczewska-Madura
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • lakes
  • rivers
  • water quality
  • contamination
  • restoration
  • water management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Damming Induced Natural Attenuation of Hydrothermal Waters by Runoff Freshwater Dilution and Sediment Biogeochemical Transformations (Sochagota Lake, Colombia)
by , , and
Water 2021, 13(23), 3445; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233445 (registering DOI) - 04 Dec 2021
Abstract
The volcanic area of the Paipa system (Boyacá, Colombia) contains a magmatic heat source and deep fractures that help the flow of hot and highly mineralized waters, which are further combined with cold superficial inputs. This mixed water recharges the Salitre River and [...] Read more.
The volcanic area of the Paipa system (Boyacá, Colombia) contains a magmatic heat source and deep fractures that help the flow of hot and highly mineralized waters, which are further combined with cold superficial inputs. This mixed water recharges the Salitre River and downstream feeding Sochagota Lake. The incoming water can contribute to substantial increases in hydrothermal SO42−-Na water in the water of the Salitre River basin area, raising the salinity. An additional hydrogeochemical process occurs in the mix with cold Fe-rich water from alluvial and surficial aquifers. This salinized Fe-rich water feeds the Sochagota Lake, although the impact of freshwaters from rain on the hydrochemistry of the Sochagota Lake is significant. A series of hydrogeochemical, biogeochemical, and mineralogical processes occur inside the lake. The aim of this work was to study the influence of damming in the Sochagota Lake, which acts as a natural attenuation of contaminants such as high concentrations of metals and salty elements coming from the Salitre River. Damming in the Sochagota Lake is considered to be an effective strategy for attenuating highly mineralized waters. The concentrations of dissolved elements were attenuated significantly. Dilution by rainfall runoff and precipitation of iron sulfides mediated by sulfate-reducing bacteria in deposits rich in organic material were the main processes involved in the attenuation of concentrations of SO42−, Fe, As Cu, and Co in the lake water. Furthermore, the K-consuming illitization processes occurring in the sediments could favor the decrease in K and Al. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Changes of Lakes and Rivers)
Article
Effects of Long-Term Increases in Water Temperature and Stratification on Large Artificial Water-Source Lakes in South Korea
Water 2021, 13(17), 2341; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13172341 - 26 Aug 2021
Viewed by 526
Abstract
Long-term changes in air and water temperatures and the resulted stratification phenomena were observed for Soyang Lake (SY), Paldang Lake (PD), Chungju Lake (CJ), and Daecheong Lake (DC) in South Korea. Non-parametric seasonal Kendall and Mann-Kendall tests, Sen slope estimator, and potential energy [...] Read more.
Long-term changes in air and water temperatures and the resulted stratification phenomena were observed for Soyang Lake (SY), Paldang Lake (PD), Chungju Lake (CJ), and Daecheong Lake (DC) in South Korea. Non-parametric seasonal Kendall and Mann-Kendall tests, Sen slope estimator, and potential energy anomaly (PEA) were applied. The lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) of SY and DC increased at the same rate (0.125 °C/y), followed by those of CJ (0.071 °C/y) and PD (0.06 °C/y). Seasonally, the LSWT increase rates for all lakes, except PD, were 2–3 times higher than the air temperature increase rates. The lake stratification intensity order was similar to those of the LSWT increases and correlations. SY and DC displayed significant correlations between LSWT (0.99) and PEA (0.91). Thus, the LSWT significantly affected stratification when the water temperature increased. PD demonstrated the lowest correlation between LSWT and PEA. Inflow, outflow, rainfall, wind speed, and retention time were significantly correlated, which varied within and between lakes depending on lake topographical, hydraulic, and hydrological factors. Thus, hydraulic problems and nutrients should be managed to minimize their effects on lake water quality and aquatic ecosystems because lake cyanobacteria can increase as localized water temperatures increase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Changes of Lakes and Rivers)
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Article
Influence of Environmental Factors on Occurrence of Cyanobacteria and Abundance of Saxitoxin-Producing Cyanobacteria in a Subtropical Drinking Water Reservoir in Brazil
Water 2021, 13(12), 1716; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121716 - 21 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 786
Abstract
Blooms of cyanobacteria are frequent in Brazilian water reservoirs used for drinking water. The warning for the presence of potential toxin-producing cyanobacteria is typically based on time-consuming microscopy, rather than specific molecular detection of toxic genes in cyanobacteria. In this study, we developed [...] Read more.
Blooms of cyanobacteria are frequent in Brazilian water reservoirs used for drinking water. The warning for the presence of potential toxin-producing cyanobacteria is typically based on time-consuming microscopy, rather than specific molecular detection of toxic genes in cyanobacteria. In this study, we developed a quantitative PCR assay for the detection of cyanobacteria producing the neurotoxin saxitoxin (STX). The assay targets the sxtA gene in the sxt gene cluster. Potential and dominant STX-producers in the Itupararanga reservoir were the genera Raphidiopsis, Aphanizomenon and Geitlerinema. Numbers of the sxtA gene varied from 6.76 × 103 to 7.33 × 105 cells mL−1 and correlated positively with SXT concentrations in the water. Concentrations of STX and the sxtA gene also correlated positively with TN:TP ratio and pH, but correlated negatively with inorganic nutrients and turbidity, confirming that regulation of the SXT production was impacted by environmental variables. In contrast, the occurrence of another cyanotoxin, microcystin, did not correlate with any environmental variables. The developed qPCR assay was found to be a rapid and robust approach for the specific quantification of potential STX-producing cyanobacteria and should be considered in future investigations on toxic cyanobacteria to provide an early warning of potential toxin episodes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Changes of Lakes and Rivers)
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Article
Selection of Optimum Pollution Load Reduction and Water Quality Improvement Approaches Using Scenario Based Water Quality Modeling in Little Akaki River, Ethiopia
Water 2021, 13(5), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13050584 - 24 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 719
Abstract
The collective impacts of rapid urbanization, poor pollution management practices and insufficient sanitation infrastructure have driven the water quality deterioration in Little Akaki River (LAR), Ethiopia. Water quality modeling using QUAL2Kw was conducted in the LAR aimed at selecting the optimal water quality [...] Read more.
The collective impacts of rapid urbanization, poor pollution management practices and insufficient sanitation infrastructure have driven the water quality deterioration in Little Akaki River (LAR), Ethiopia. Water quality modeling using QUAL2Kw was conducted in the LAR aimed at selecting the optimal water quality improvement and pollution load reduction approaches based on the evaluation of five scenarios: modification of point sources (PS) load (S1), modification of nonpoint sources (NPS) load (S2), simultaneous modification of PS and NPS load (S3), application of local oxygenators and fish passages using cascaded rock ramps (S4), and an integrated scenario (S5). Despite the evaluation of S1 resulting in an average load reduction of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) (17.72%), PO4-P (37.47%), NO3-N (19.63%), the water quality objective (WQO) in LAR could not be attained. Similarly, though significant improvement of pollution load was found by S2 and S3 evaluation, it did not secure the permissible BOD and PO4-P pollution load in the LAR. Besides, as part of an instream measure, a scenario evaluated using the application of rock ramps (S4) resulted in significant reduction of BOD load. All the individual scenarios were not successful and hence an integration of scenarios (S5) was evaluated in LAR that gave a relatively higher pollutant load reduction rate and ultimately was found a better approach to improve pollution loads in the river. In conclusion, pollution load management and control strategy integrally incorporating the use of source-based wastewater treatment, control of diffuse pollution sources through the application of best management practices and the application of instream measures such as the use of cascaded rock ramps could be a feasible approach for better river water quality management, pollution reduction, aquatic life protection and secure sustainable development in the LAR catchment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Changes of Lakes and Rivers)
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