Special Issue "Physical, Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Water Treated with Plasmas"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (11 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Piotr Tomasik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nantes Nanotechnological Systems, Boleslawiec, Poland
Interests: chemical and physicochemical modification of carbohydrates; nanotechnology: modifications of carbon nanotubes and quantum dots, luminescent carbon nanotubes and polysaccharide foils, nanowater; metal–metal interactions in biological systems; weak electric and magnetic phenomena and their applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There are numerous research reports and presentations on the treatment of aqueous solutions and suspensions as well as water-containing species such as plants, food products, isolated microorganisms, even concrete, all of them containing water. Particular plasmas evoke several interesting changes of physical, physicochemical, and functional properties of treated materials. Undoubtedly, observed effects are associated with a building, reconstruction and ruining water macrostructure included therein. These processes depending on the type of plasma may result in microbiological sterilization of the treated material, but also in a stimulation of some microorganisms.

The latter may influence the growth of plants, their bioaccumulation of metal ions, and synthesis of chlorophyll and carotenoids. Treatment with some types of plasma can evoke some chemical reactions, among them some facilitated, for instance, by hydration and transport of hydrated species.

In this issue, papers are welcome which are associated with such phenomena.

Prof. Dr. Piotr Tomasik
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Agriculture
  • Animal breeding
  • Food technology
  • Microorganism inhibition
  • Microorganism stimulation
  • Plant production
  • Scale formation
  • Solubilizing gases
  • Solubilizing minerals

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Effect of Watering of Selected Seasoning Herbs with Water Treated with Low-Temperature, Low-Pressure Glow Plasma of Low Frequency
Water 2020, 12(12), 3526; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123526 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 476
Abstract
Plantations of lovage, marjoram, rosemary and thyme were watered with water treated with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low frequency. Such watering appeared beneficial to the extent dependent on particular herb. In terms of crop yield and quality, water treated with glow plasma [...] Read more.
Plantations of lovage, marjoram, rosemary and thyme were watered with water treated with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low frequency. Such watering appeared beneficial to the extent dependent on particular herb. In terms of crop yield and quality, water treated with glow plasma performed best in the case of rosemary, and the worst results were observed for thyme. When yield of essential oils are taken into account, only in the case of lovage did such watering appear beneficial, while in the remaining cases it had no effect. However, such watering considerably changed the composition of essential oils. These changes were specific for a given herb and involved the quantity of particular components of the oils. Only in the essential oil from lovage did γ-terpinene appear as its novel component. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Specific Controlling Essential Oil Composition of Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) Involving Low-Temperature, Low-Pressure Glow Plasma of Low Frequency
Water 2020, 12(12), 3332; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123332 - 27 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 633
Abstract
The effect of watering basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) with water treated with low-pressure, low-temperature glow plasma of low frequency (LPGP) on growth habits and plant metabolites was tested. Watering with the LPGP treated water was beneficial for sprouting basil seeds. Watering with [...] Read more.
The effect of watering basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) with water treated with low-pressure, low-temperature glow plasma of low frequency (LPGP) on growth habits and plant metabolites was tested. Watering with the LPGP treated water was beneficial for sprouting basil seeds. Watering with non-treated water was advantageous solely for the number of leaves per plant and mass of one leaf. Watering with the LPGP treated water in contact with the air (LPGPA), nitrogen (LPGPN), carbon dioxide (LPGPC), and methane (LPGPM) increased the total yield of collected essential oil by 40%, 60%, 20%, and 20%, respectively. Watering with water treated under molecular oxygen (LPGPO) decreased that yield by 12.5%. A diverse effect of particular kinds of the LPGP treated water upon the composition of isolated essential oil was also noted. Full article
Article
Reaction of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. to Water Treated with Low-Temperature, Low-Pressure Glow Plasma of Low Frequency
Water 2020, 12(11), 3168; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113168 - 12 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 516
Abstract
Lavandula angustifolia was watered with either deionized tap water treated with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low frequency in the air (LPGPA), under oxygen-free nitrogen (LPGPN), methane (LPGPM), carbon dioxide (LPGPC) or molecular oxygen (LPGPO). The crop yields were slightly dependent on the [...] Read more.
Lavandula angustifolia was watered with either deionized tap water treated with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low frequency in the air (LPGPA), under oxygen-free nitrogen (LPGPN), methane (LPGPM), carbon dioxide (LPGPC) or molecular oxygen (LPGPO). The crop yields were slightly dependent on the type of water used for watering. Notably, only plants watered with LPGPN showed a slightly higher crop yield. The plants also contained a higher level of protein and bioaccumulated magnesium. The type of water had a considerable and specific effect on the yield of isolated essential oils and their composition. The yield of essential oil decreased in the following order LPGPA = LPGPN (0.4 g/100 g dry mass) > LPGPC = LPGPO (0.3 g/100 g dry mass) > LPGPM = non-treated water (0.2 g/100 g dry mass). The composition of the isolated essential oils varied depending on the type of water used for watering, which influences their role as a fragrant component of cosmetics, and in herbal therapy and aromatherapy. Full article
Article
Water of Increased Content of Molecular Oxygen
Water 2020, 12(9), 2488; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12092488 - 05 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 941
Abstract
Deionized and tap water were saturated with molecular oxygen either prior to (WST), or after (WTS), treatment with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low frequency (LPGP) for 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Physical and physicochemical properties of the resulting [...] Read more.
Deionized and tap water were saturated with molecular oxygen either prior to (WST), or after (WTS), treatment with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low frequency (LPGP) for 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Physical and physicochemical properties of the resulting liquids were characterized, involving pH, conductivity, density, dissolved molecular oxygen, active oxygen content, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS), Fourier transformation infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR), electronic spin resonance (ESR), and Raman spectroscopies. Tap WST treated with LPGP for 30 min contained the highest level of dissolved molecular oxygen, compared to original non-treated tap water (23 and 15 mg/L, respectively). Essential differences in all investigated properties of LPGP treated tap and deionized WST, compared to those for corresponding WTS, pointed to the indispensable role of dissolved oxygen molecules in building water macrostructure. In the case of tap WST, formation of niches and/or caverns hosting anions (HCO3, SO4=) was accompanied by cations less enveloped by hydroxyl groups of water. The WST water contained niches of larger size, hosting molecules of oxygen interacting with the environment in various manners. In WTS there was a priority for single donor, single hydrogen bonded water, and free water in building the macrostructure. Such macrostructures host molecular oxygen which, depending on the LPGP treatment time, took either a singlet of triplet state. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Cultivation of Cress Involving Water Treated Under Different Atmospheres with Low-Temperature, Low-Pressure Glow Plasma of Low Frequency
Water 2020, 12(8), 2152; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082152 - 30 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 641
Abstract
Watering cress with tap water treated for 30 min with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low frequency (LPGP) in the air (LPGPA), saturated with either nitrogen (LPGPN), CO2 (LPGPC) or methane (LPGPM), promoted the yield of crops. Their efficiency increased in the [...] Read more.
Watering cress with tap water treated for 30 min with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low frequency (LPGP) in the air (LPGPA), saturated with either nitrogen (LPGPN), CO2 (LPGPC) or methane (LPGPM), promoted the yield of crops. Their efficiency increased in the order LPGPA < LPGPN < LPGPM < LPGPC. The kind of water prior and after the treatment specifically influenced the fat and protein content in the watered cress and had no effect on the carbohydrate content. Watering cress with water saturated with N2 and CO2 slightly increased the total chlorophyll content, whereas watering with water saturated with CH4 significantly decreased it. Watering with plasma-treated water always resulted in an increase in the total chlorophyll content and subtly influenced the content of carotenoids and ascorbic acid. Watering cress with water saturated with particular gases influenced the bioaccumulation of cations and anions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Structure and Physicochemical Properties of Water Treated under Carbon Dioxide with Low-Temperature Low-Pressure Glow Plasma of Low Frequency
Water 2020, 12(7), 1920; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071920 - 06 Jul 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 712
Abstract
Treatment of water saturated with CO2 with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low-frequency (GP) produced a series of liquids. Their temperature and intensity of thermal effects non-linearly depended on the treatment time. However, the Raman spectra patterns of the treated water pointed [...] Read more.
Treatment of water saturated with CO2 with low-temperature, low-pressure glow plasma of low-frequency (GP) produced a series of liquids. Their temperature and intensity of thermal effects non-linearly depended on the treatment time. However, the Raman spectra patterns of the treated water pointed to a specific structure of the water treated for 30 min. The spectra of control, non-treated water saturated with CO2, and such water treated for 15, 60, 90, and 120 min showed that their macrostructure was built mainly by a single donor, and single hydrogen bonded arrangements accompanied, to a certain extent, with free water molecules. The macrostructure of the water treated for 30 min consisted chiefly of tetrahedral and deformed tetrahedral structural units. That water contained long-living free radicals of discussed structure, stabilized in such macrostructure. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop