Special Issue "Sustainable Management of Urban Water Resources"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Susanne Charlesworth
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, Ryton Gardens, Wolston Lane, Coventry CV8 3LG, UK
Interests: Sustainable drainage, greywater management, urban pollution, refugee camps, informal settlements
Dr. Craig Lashford
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, Ryton Gardens, Wolston Lane, Coventry CV8 3LG, UK
Interests: Sustainable drainage, urban flooding, flood modelling, natural flood risk management, hydrological monitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is well known that currently 55% of the world’s population live in urban areas, and this is predicted to grow to 68% by 2050, adding more than 2.5 billion people to urban populations. It is also projected that there will be 43 megacities worldwide by 2030, with populations of more than 10 million inhabitants. Most of these huge cities will be in developing regions. Many cities are therefore growing at rates that exceed their capacity to accommodate their increasing populations, with cities such as Cape Town, South Africa having had widely publicised struggles to maintain a secure and safe supply of water to residents. Other cities face similar problems, and the United Nations World Water Development Report, 2018, warned that by 2030, the global demand for fresh water is likely to exceed supply by 40%. Added to population growth, climate change has the potential to lead to changes in rainfall regimes, with the potential of increased flooding and drought. Currently, 1.2 billion people are at risk from flooding, but this is predicted to increase to about 1.6 billion by 2050; representing nearly 20% of the total world population. In line with this, replacing deteriorating water management infrastructure that can no longer cope is economically unfeasible, impracticable from a construction point of view, and is likely to fail in the long term.

To address this multicomplexity of issues approaches are needed that are flexible and have multiple benefits. In its World Water Development Report, 2018, the UN promotes the use of nature-based solutions to some of these problems, with the focus of Sustainable Development Goal 6 making sure that everyone has access to a safe and affordable supply of potable water and sanitation by 2030, requiring investment in suitable infrastructure across the world.

This Special Issue will cover the challenges faced in managing urban water in all its forms from potable supplies, to reuse and harvesting, as well as resilient and sustainable approaches developed to address flooding and drought. We are looking for articles worldwide, from formal and informal settlements and developed, transitioning and developing countries and welcome field studies, laboratory experiments, modelling and design.

Prof. Susanne Charlesworth
Dr. Craig Lashford
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Potable supplies
  • sustainable drainage
  • flood resilience
  • greywater management
  • drought
  • SDG6
  • water efficiency

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Groundwater Demand for Industrial Uses in Areas with Access to Drinking Publicly-Supplied Water: A Microdata Analysis
Water 2020, 12(1), 198; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12010198 - 10 Jan 2020
Abstract
This study examines, from an economic perspective, the factors influencing the decision of companies to use groundwater or not, in a context in which they have access to drinking publicly-supplied water and can also opt for self-supplying groundwater, and then estimates its groundwater [...] Read more.
This study examines, from an economic perspective, the factors influencing the decision of companies to use groundwater or not, in a context in which they have access to drinking publicly-supplied water and can also opt for self-supplying groundwater, and then estimates its groundwater demand. The Heckman two-stage model is applied, using microdata of a sample of 2579 manufacturing and service companies located in Zaragoza (Spain). The results of the first stage show that companies have economically rational behavior in the choice of their water supply sources: the probability to capture groundwater depends negatively on its cost and positively on the cost of publicly-supplied water. The results of the second stage indicate that the demand for self-supplied groundwater is normal, but inelastic (elasticity of −0.50), and that self-supplied and publicly-supplied water are substitutive inputs, where the cross-elasticity of the demand is much higher than the direct elasticity. These results warn of the undesirable consequences, on overall efficiency and environmental sustainability, of the lack of a volumetric fee that charges companies with the environmental and resource costs caused by the extraction of groundwater and emphasize the need for integrated management of all water resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Urban Water Resources)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Frequency of Multi-Source Water Supply on Regional Guarantee Rate of Water Use
Water 2019, 11(7), 1356; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071356 - 29 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Multi-source, combined water supply models play an increasingly important role in solving regional water supply problems. At present, in the area of regional water supply, models are mainly used to study the problem of overall water guarantee rate, and do not take into [...] Read more.
Multi-source, combined water supply models play an increasingly important role in solving regional water supply problems. At present, in the area of regional water supply, models are mainly used to study the problem of overall water guarantee rate, and do not take into account the impact of the uncertainty of multi-source water supplies on water supply risk. There is also a lack of research on how changes in multi-source water supplies affect sub-region and sub-user water guarantee rates. To address this knowledge gap, the encounter probability of different frequencies and a refined water resources allocation model of multi-source supplies were used. Using Tianjin as an example, this paper studies the quantitative relationship between the uncertainty of multi-source water inflows and the regional guarantee rate of water use. The objectives of the study are to analyze the changing trend of the water shortage rate and the main body of water supply in each region, and to quantitatively describe the influence of the variation of multi-source water supply on the main body of water supply for users. The results show that under the same requirement of guarantee rate for water use, as the number of water diversion sources increase, the probability of water supply meeting the water use rate increases significantly, and the risk to water supplies decreases. At the same time, suburban areas have a low dependence on external water supplies, while the change in the quantity of external water sources has a great impact on the water supply of the Zhongxinchengqu and Binhaixiqnu areas. The distribution and main body of water supply will change for different water users. Therefore, it is important to ensure a stable supply of external water for maintaining the guarantee rate of regional water use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Urban Water Resources)
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Open AccessArticle
Water Quality Control Options in Response to Catchment Urbanization: A Scenario Analysis by SWAT
Water 2018, 10(12), 1846; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10121846 - 13 Dec 2018
Abstract
Urbanization poses a challenge to sustainable catchment management worldwide. This study compares streamflows and nutrient loads in the urbanized Torrens catchment in South Australia at present and future urbanization levels, and addresses possible mitigation of urbanization effects by means of the control measures: [...] Read more.
Urbanization poses a challenge to sustainable catchment management worldwide. This study compares streamflows and nutrient loads in the urbanized Torrens catchment in South Australia at present and future urbanization levels, and addresses possible mitigation of urbanization effects by means of the control measures: river bank stabilization, buffer strip expansion, and wetland construction. A scenario analysis by means of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) based on the anticipated urban population density growth in the Torrens catchment over the next 30 years predicted a remarkable increase of streamflow and Total Phosphorous loads but decreased Total Nitrogen loads. In contrast, minor changes of model outputs were predicted under the present urbanization scenario, i.e. urban area expansion on the grassland. Scenarios of three feasible control measures demonstrated best results for expanding buffer zone to sustain stream water quality. The construction of wetlands along the Torrens River resulted in the reduction of catchment runoff, but only slight decreases in TN and TP loads. Overall, the results of this study suggested that combining the three best management practices by the adaptive development of buffer zones, wetlands and stabilized river banks might help to control efficiently the increased run-off and TP loads by the projected urbanization of the River Torrens catchment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Urban Water Resources)
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