Special Issue "Emerging Organic Contaminants in Water Ecosystems"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stefano Polesello
Website
Guest Editor
IRSA-CNR (Water Research Institute)
Interests: emerging contaminants; HPLC-MS; perfluorinated compounds; environmental quality standards; fate of organic compounds; extraction methods; biota monitoring
Dr. Luisa Patrolecco
Website
Guest Editor
IRSA-CNR (Water Research Institute)
Interests: organic contaminants in aquatic ecosystems; chemical-physical characterization of the organic substance
Dr. Nicoletta Ademollo
Website
Guest Editor
IRSA-CNR (Water Research Institute)
Interests: environmental chemistry; monitoring; remote areas
Dr. Sara Valsecchi
Website
Guest Editor
IRSA-CNR (Water Research Institute)
Interests: mass spectrometry; high-performance liquid chromatography; environmental analytical chemistry; aquatic ecotoxicology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the end of the 20th century, the very fast development of mass spectrometric techniques hyphenated to liquid chromatography opened the possibility to explore the fate and distribution of new classes of polar, and not yet regulated, compounds, which were collected under the generic name of emerging contaminants. After about twenty years of studies, we need to point out the status of the research in this field. This Special Issue aims to cover the most recent achievements in the field of analytical methods for the determination of emerging contaminants in the different aquatic matrices; their fate and distribution in the aquatic ecosystems including bioaccumulation in biota; their effects on aquatic ecosystems at different oraganization levels. The evidence of the wide occurrence of many classes of emerging compounds, such as pharmaceuticals, personal care products, perfluorinated compounds, siloxanes, in the aquatic environment and the risks connected with their presence made urgent to develop targeted treatment methods and derive environmental quality standards or threshold values for surface, ground and drinking waters in order to manage the problem.

Dr. Stefano Polesello
Dr. Luisa Patrolecco
Dr. Nicoletta Ademollo
Dr. Sara Valsecchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Emerging contaminants
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • personal care products
  • perfluorinated compounds
  • siloxanes
  • bioaccumulation
  • effect based methods
  • mass spectrometry
  • treatment technologies
  • environmental quality standards

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Organic Contaminants in Zooplankton of Italian Subalpine Lakes: Patterns of Distribution and Seasonal Variations
Water 2019, 11(9), 1901; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091901 - 12 Sep 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Zooplankton is a key node in many trophic webs, both for food that for persistent organic contaminants that can accumulate in biota. Zooplankton of different size was seasonally sampled for two years in three deep Italian subalpine lakes (Maggiore, Como, Iseo) with the [...] Read more.
Zooplankton is a key node in many trophic webs, both for food that for persistent organic contaminants that can accumulate in biota. Zooplankton of different size was seasonally sampled for two years in three deep Italian subalpine lakes (Maggiore, Como, Iseo) with the aim of determining the concentrations of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), DDT, and PCB, and assessing the seasonality impacts on contaminants concentrations. In general, Lake Maggiore showed the highest concentrations for each group of contaminants, with mean values of 7.6 ng g−1 ww for PFAS, 65.0 ng g−1 dw for DDT, and 65.5 ng g−1 dw for PCB. When considering the composition pattern, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was detected in 96% of the samples and it was the predominant PFAS compound in all of the lakes. pp’ DDE was the most detected congener among DDTs and their metabolites, while for PCBs, the prevalent group was hexa-CB that constituted 35.4% of the total PCB contamination. A seasonal trend was highlighted for all contaminant groups with concentrations in colder months greater than in spring and summer; it was evident that the contaminant concentrations were more dependent from seasonality than from size, trophic levels, and taxa composition of zooplankton. Principal component analysis showed that one of the main driver for the accumulation of most of the studied contaminants is their lipophilicity, except for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and octachlorobiphenyl. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Organic Contaminants in Water Ecosystems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
PFASs in Finnish Rivers and Fish and the Loading of PFASs to the Baltic Sea
Water 2019, 11(4), 870; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040870 - 25 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The concentrations of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the Finnish aquatic environment were measured in riverine waters and in inland, coastal and open sea fish. In addition, the PFAS load to the Baltic Sea from 11 rivers was calculated. Measurements show that [...] Read more.
The concentrations of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the Finnish aquatic environment were measured in riverine waters and in inland, coastal and open sea fish. In addition, the PFAS load to the Baltic Sea from 11 rivers was calculated. Measurements show that PFASs, including restricted perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), are widely present in the Finnish aquatic environment. At three out of 45 sampling sites, the concentration of PFOS in fish exceeded the environmental quality standard (EQS) of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). The annual average (AA) ∑23PFAS concentration in surface waters ranged from 1.8 to 42 ng L−1 and the concentration of PFOS exceeded the AA-EQS in three out of 13 water bodies. In European perch (Perca fluviatilis) and Baltic herring (Clupea harengus membras), the ∑PFAS concentration ranged from 0.98 to 1 µg kg−1 f.w. (fresh weight) and from 0.2 to 2.4 µg kg−1 f.w., respectively. The highest concentrations in both surface water and fish were found in waters of southern Finland. The riverine export of ∑10PFAS to the Baltic Sea from individual rivers ranged from 0.4 kg yr−1 to 18 kg yr−1. PFAS concentrations in fish of point-source-polluted sites and coastal sites were higher compared to fish of open sea or diffusely polluted sites. The PFAS profiles in surface waters of background sites were different from other sites. This study shows that PFASs are widely found in the Finnish aquatic environment. Different PFAS profiles in samples from background areas and densely populated areas indicate diverse sources of PFASs. Although atmospheric deposition has a substantial influence on PFAS occurrence in remote areas, it is not the dominant source of all PFASs to the aquatic environment of Finland. Rather, wastewaters and presumably contaminated land areas are major sources of PFASs to this aquatic environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Organic Contaminants in Water Ecosystems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop