Special Issue "Ecology and Management of Riparian and Wetland Vegetation in the Anthropocene"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 May 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Samantha Capon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment and Science, Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Queensland 4111, Australia
Interests: riparian and wetland ecology; environmental water management; riparian restoration; ecological monitoring and evaluation; ethics and philosophy of ecological science
Prof. Dr. Fran Sheldon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment and Science, Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Queensland 4111, Australia
Interests: freshwater ecology; stream and river health; riparian restoration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Riparian and wetland vegetation are disproportionately valuable components of the landscape, harboring high levels of biodiversity and supporting a wide range of critical ecosystem functions and services across multiple scales. In many human-dominated landscapes, however, riparian and wetland ecosystems have also been subject to intense levels of human pressure, now exacerbated by climate change. Degradation of riparian vegetation in particular is increasingly associated with many major environmental problems including deteriorating water quality, bank instability and biodiversity loss. Restoration of riparian and wetland vegetation is now widely recognized as a priority for catchment management. In this special issue, we will consider current understanding of riparian and wetland vegetation ecology in the Anthropocene as well as emerging approaches to its restoration and management.

We invite you to contribute your recent research and opinion pieces in relation to understanding riparian and wetland vegetation ecology in the Anthropocene as well novel approaches to its restoration and management.

Assoc. Prof. Samantha Capon
Prof. Dr. Fran Sheldon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • buffers
  • catchment management
  • environmental water
  • plant communities
  • water regimes

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Nearshore Fish Species Richness and Species–Habitat Associations in the St. Clair–Detroit River System
Water 2021, 13(12), 1616; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121616 - 08 Jun 2021
Viewed by 682
Abstract
Shallow water riparian zones of large rivers provide important habitat for fishes, but anthropogenic influences have reduced the availability and quality of these habitats. In the St. Clair–Detroit River System, a Laurentian Great Lakes connecting channel, losses of riparian habitat contributed to impairment [...] Read more.
Shallow water riparian zones of large rivers provide important habitat for fishes, but anthropogenic influences have reduced the availability and quality of these habitats. In the St. Clair–Detroit River System, a Laurentian Great Lakes connecting channel, losses of riparian habitat contributed to impairment of fish populations and their habitats. We conducted a seine survey annually from 2013 to 2019 at ten sites in the St. Clair and Detroit rivers to assess riparian fish communities, and to identify habitat attributes associated with fish species richness and catches of common species. We captured a total of 38,451 fish representing 60 species, with emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides composing the largest portion of the catch. We used an information-theoretic approach to assess the associations between species richness and catches of 33 species with habitat variables (substrate, shoreline vegetation types, and aquatic macrophyte richness). Sand, cobble, and algal substrates and shoreline vegetation were important predictors of species richness based on a multimodel inference approach. However, habitat associations of individual species varied. This work identified manageable habitat variables associated with species richness, while identifying potential tradeoffs for individual species. Further, this work provides baselines for development and evaluation of fish community and shoreline habitat restoration goals. Full article
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