Special Issue "Ecohydrological Response to Environmental Change"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 2475

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bharat Sharma Acharya
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mines, State of Oklahoma, 2915 North Classen Blvd., Suite 213, Oklahoma City, OK 73106, USA
Interests: ecohydrology; mining hydrology; irrigation; soil and water management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Briana Wyatt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Interests: soil physics; soil health; hydrology; meteorology; remote sensing; soil and hydrological modeling
Dr. Gehendra Kharel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Science & Engineering, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129, USA
Interests: hydrology; climate change; water resources; hydrological modeling; geospatial technologies; coupled nature-human systems; remote sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impacts of environmental changes on ecohydrological processes are increasing due to a number of factors including rising global temperatures, growing climatic variability, and increasing human management of natural systems. This special issue aims to bring together novel research articles which advance the current knowledge on ecohydrological response to environmental changes derived from modeling applications, monitoring, and experimental research. We also seek research which describes how these ecohydrological responses may be used to develop tools for the sustainable use and management of water resources.

The topics of interest for this special issue include but are not limited to soil moisture dynamics, soil-plant interactions, nutrient-sediment transport, woody encroachment, landscape/basin modeling,  in-situ sensor network and remote rensing applications, and impacts of climate change on ecohydrological processes. Authors are encouraged to submit abstracts to the editorial board prior to submission for feedback regarding the appropriateness of the work for inclusion in the special section.

Dr. Bharat Sharma Acharya
Dr. Briana Wyatt
Dr. Gehendra Kharel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ecohydrology
  • modeling
  • water management
  • ecosystem services
  • remote sensing
  • erosion
  • runoff
  • groundwater

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Distributions of Grass Strips on Soil Erosion in Spoil Tips
Water 2022, 14(6), 913; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14060913 - 15 Mar 2022
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Abstract
The spatial distribution pattern of vegetation is of great significance to the prevention and control of soil erosion in spoil tips. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spatial distributions of grass strips on soil erosion in spoil tips. [...] Read more.
The spatial distribution pattern of vegetation is of great significance to the prevention and control of soil erosion in spoil tips. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spatial distributions of grass strips on soil erosion in spoil tips. A field runoff plot (20 m long, 1 m wide, and 0.5 m deep) was used for inflow simulation experiments under four inflow rate patterns (even, rising, falling, and rising–falling) and five grass strip patterns (patterns I–V). Results showed that the runoff reduction benefit (RRB) and soil loss reduction benefit (SLRB) of grass strip patterns were 12.23–49.62% and 12.92–80.54%, respectively. The optimal grass strip pattern was when the grass strips were distributed on a slope in bands (pattern V). In this pattern, the soil and water conservation effects were best, with RRB and SLRB of 43.87% and 58.09%, respectively. The grass strip patterns exhibited a significant time-limited effect on controlling soil erosion. The maximum amount of soil loss reduction for patterns II, III, IV, and V was 93.02, 84.30, 65.86, and 98.26 kg, respectively. Soil loss reduction caused by decreasing runoff (SRR) for grass strip patterns was the main factor controlling erosion. The efficiency coefficient of soil loss reduction caused by decreasing runoff for pattern V was higher than that for the other patterns. The grass strip pattern V (i.e., grass strips were distributed on a slope in bands) should be considered a priority in the prevention of soil erosion in spoil tips. This study can guide the configuration of vegetation control measures for soil and water loss in spoil tips. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecohydrological Response to Environmental Change)
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Article
Upland Rootzone Soil Water Deficit Regulates Streamflow in a Catchment Dominated by North American Tallgrass Prairie
Water 2022, 14(5), 759; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14050759 - 28 Feb 2022
Viewed by 610
Abstract
Intermittent tallgrass prairie streams depend on surface runoff and are highly susceptible to hydrological disturbances such as droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the timing of intermittent streamflow pulses and upstream rootzone soil water deficit in a watershed dominated by [...] Read more.
Intermittent tallgrass prairie streams depend on surface runoff and are highly susceptible to hydrological disturbances such as droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the timing of intermittent streamflow pulses and upstream rootzone soil water deficit in a watershed dominated by tallgrass prairie. The study was conducted from July to December 2021 in the Kings Creek watershed located within the Konza Prairie Biological station, Kansas, USA. Hourly precipitation and soil moisture observations in the 0–10, 10–30, and 30–50 cm depth were obtained from a hydrological network consisting of 16 monitoring stations across the Kings Creek watershed. Rootzone soil water storage (S) was computed at hourly time steps as the sum of the soil water storage of each soil layer. A drained upper limit (DUL) was estimated as the soil moisture remaining 24 h after the soil had been thoroughly wetted during large (~100 mm) rainfall events. A lower limit (LL) was estimated as the lowest rootzone soil water storage during the study period. Hourly soil water deficit (D) was computed as D = (DULS)/(DULLL). The study period had 19 precipitation events totaling 436 mm, and only 14 out of the 19 precipitation events exceeded a common canopy and litter interception threshold of 4 mm for tallgrass prairies in this region. Only two precipitation events resulted in measurable streamflow, and the inception of these two streamflow events was associated with a negative weighted soil water deficit (i.e., S > DUL). This pilot study revealed that upland rootzone soil water deficit plays a major role controlling the timing of streamflow in the Kings Creek watershed and possibly in other catchment areas with intermittent prairie streams. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecohydrological Response to Environmental Change)
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Article
Using the Change Point Model (CPM) Framework to Identify Windows for Water Resource Management Action in the Lower Colorado River Basin of Texas, USA
Water 2022, 14(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010018 - 22 Dec 2021
Viewed by 860
Abstract
In water-stressed river basins with growing urban populations, conflicts over water resources have emerged between urban and agricultural interests, as managerial interventions occur with little warning and tend to favor urban over agricultural water uses. This research documents changes in water use along [...] Read more.
In water-stressed river basins with growing urban populations, conflicts over water resources have emerged between urban and agricultural interests, as managerial interventions occur with little warning and tend to favor urban over agricultural water uses. This research documents changes in water use along an urban-to-agricultural gradient to examine whether it is possible to leverage temporal fluctuations in key quantitative data indicators to detect periods in which we could expect substantive managerial interventions in water resource management. We employ the change point model (CPM) framework to locate shifts in water use, climate-related indicators, lake and river characteristics, and agricultural trends across urban and agricultural counties in the lower Colorado River basin of Texas. Three distinctive groupings of change points appear. Increasing water use by urban counties and a shift in local climate conditions characterize the first period. Declines in agricultural counties’ water use and crop production define the second. Drops in lake levels, lower river discharge, and an extended drought mark the third. We interpret the results relative to documented managerial intervention events and show that managerial interventions occur during and after significant change points. We conclude that the CPM framework may be used to monitor the optimal timing of managerial interventions and their effects to avoid negative outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecohydrological Response to Environmental Change)
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