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Special Issue "Coastal Resources Economics and Ecosystem Valuation"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (3 May 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. J. Walter Milon

University of Central Florida and National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, Orlando, FL 32816
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Environmental economics; marine resource economics; environmental valuation
Guest Editor
Prof. Sergio Alvarez

University of Central Florida and National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, Orlando, FL 32816
E-Mail
Interests: Natural resource economics; Environmental economics; Recreation and Tourism; Non-market valuation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal areas around the world are dynamic environments at the interface of terrestrial, marine, and freshwater systems. Nearly 40% of the world’s people already live in these areas, yet coastal zones are increasingly attractive for development and tourism, and are vulnerable to a variety of impacts from land use, water management, nutrients, invasive species, extreme weather, sea level rise and oil spills, among others.

This Special Issue will focus on original research into the application of economic valuation methods to understand and measure the contribution of coastal resources and ecosystems to human well-being. These resources include, but are not limited to: estuaries, beaches, wetlands, shores, mangroves, seagrasses and salt marsh, coral reefs, and essential fish habitat. Valuation methods include the full range of methods: stated and revealed preference, hedonic pricing, bioeconomic models, and habitat equivalency analysis.

The goal is to provide meaningful information for policymakers and resource managers about the economic significance of coastal resources for planning and restoration. We welcome papers from researchers around the world to provide a broad international perspective on new developments in this area.

Prof. J. Walter Milon
Prof. Sergio Alvarez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental valuation
  • Coastal ecosystem service valuation
  • Coastal management
  • Ecosystem restoration

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Valuing Provision Scenarios of Coastal Ecosystem Services: The Case of Boat Ramp Closures Due to Harmful Algae Blooms in Florida
Water 2019, 11(6), 1250; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061250 (registering DOI)
Received: 13 May 2019 / Revised: 9 June 2019 / Accepted: 11 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
PDF Full-text (15035 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Ecosystem service flows may change or disappear temporarily or permanently as a result of environmental changes or ecological disturbances. In coastal areas, ecological disturbances caused by toxin-producing harmful algae blooms can impact flows of ecosystem services, particularly provisioning (e.g., seafood harvesting) and cultural [...] Read more.
Ecosystem service flows may change or disappear temporarily or permanently as a result of environmental changes or ecological disturbances. In coastal areas, ecological disturbances caused by toxin-producing harmful algae blooms can impact flows of ecosystem services, particularly provisioning (e.g., seafood harvesting) and cultural services (e.g., recreation). This study uses a random utility model of recreational boating choices to simulate changes in the value of cultural ecosystem services provided by recreation in coastal ecosystems resulting from prolonged ecological disturbances caused by harmful algae blooms. The empirical application relies on observed trips to 35 alternative boat access ramps in Lee County, an important marine access destination in southwest Florida. Results indicate that reduced boating access from harmful algae blooms may have resulted in losses of $3 million for the 2018 blooms, which lasted from the end of June to the end of September. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Resources Economics and Ecosystem Valuation)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Applying Spatial Mapping of Remotely Sensed Data to Valuation of Coastal Ecosystem Services in the Gulf of Mexico
Water 2019, 11(6), 1179; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061179
Received: 26 April 2019 / Revised: 23 May 2019 / Accepted: 30 May 2019 / Published: 5 June 2019
PDF Full-text (1804 KB)
Abstract
Spatial mapping of remote sensing data tends to be used less when valuing coastal ecosystem services than in other ecosystems. This research project aimed to understand obstacles to the use of remote sensing data in coastal ecosystem valuations, and to educate coastal stakeholders [...] Read more.
Spatial mapping of remote sensing data tends to be used less when valuing coastal ecosystem services than in other ecosystems. This research project aimed to understand obstacles to the use of remote sensing data in coastal ecosystem valuations, and to educate coastal stakeholders on potential remote sensing data sources and techniques. A workshop program identified important barriers to the adoption of remote sensing data: perceived gaps in spatial and temporal scale, uncertainty about confidence intervals and precision of remote sensing data, and linkages between coastal ecosystem services and values. Case studies that demonstrated the state of the science were used to show methods to overcome the barriers. The case studies demonstrate multiple approaches to valuation that have been used successfully in coastal projects, and validate that spatial mapping of remote sensing data may fill critical gaps, such as cost-effectively generating calibrated historical data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Resources Economics and Ecosystem Valuation)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Valuing Coastal Habitat–Fishery Linkages under Regulated Open Access
Water 2019, 11(4), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040847
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 4 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
PDF Full-text (216 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper explores how regulation of an open access fishery influences the value of a coastal habitat that serves as breeding and nursery grounds. A model of the fishery supported by a coastal wetland is developed, which includes a quota rule that restricts [...] Read more.
This paper explores how regulation of an open access fishery influences the value of a coastal habitat that serves as breeding and nursery grounds. A model of the fishery supported by a coastal wetland is developed, which includes a quota rule that restricts harvest to a fixed proportion of the current stock. The model is applied to mangrove-dependent shellfish and demersal fisheries in Thailand. The value of the welfare effects associated with a change in a supporting coastal habitat is influenced significantly by whether or not the regulatory quota can adjust in response to these changes. Welfare losses are considerably higher when the quota is fixed as opposed to when it can be adjusted. With the restriction in place, effort cannot change to offset the decline in biomass, and as a result, there is a much larger fall in harvest. In addition, the welfare losses are much larger for the shellfish compared to the demersal fisheries. The analysis illustrates that imposing a regulatory rule on an open access fishery has important implications for valuing any linkage between coastal breeding and nursery habitat and a near-shore fishery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Resources Economics and Ecosystem Valuation)
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