Microplastics in Wetlands: Occurrence, Fate and Interactions

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 6272

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, 113 Večna Pot, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
Interests: bioremediation; constructed wetlands; ecotoxicity; environmental engineering; microplastics; phytoremediation; pollutants; wastewater treatment

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Guest Editor
Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection, University of Wrocław, 50-328 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: aquatic plants; trace metals; microplastics; bioindication; aquatic pollution; ecotoxicology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plastic pollution is a major environmental problem attracting the attention of scientists and the public. Plastics of a small fraction (1–1000 µm), i.e., microplastics (MPs), are receiving special attention due to their wide occurrence, high persistence in the environment, potential for ecological harm, and impact on human health. Wastewaters carry significant amounts of MPs that, if not treated properly, accumulate in the environment. Conventional wastewater treatment plants can remove a major part of MPs in the treatment process, but there is almost no research concerning MPs’ behavior and fate in constructed wetlands (CW).

Therefore, the goal of this Special Issue is to provide a platform to promote, share, and discuss various issues and recent developments concerning MPs’ occurrence, fate, and interactions with other pollutants in wetlands to understand the impact of MPs on the wetland environment and to propose effective removal strategies.

We welcome high-quality, original research articles as well as review papers. For this Special Issue, potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Source, transport, distribution, and accumulation of MPs in wetlands;
  • Methods for detection and analysis of MPs in wetland environments;
  • Aging, transformation, and degradation of MPs in wetlands;
  • Effects and interactions of MPs on wetland organisms;
  • Interactions of MPs with other pollutants;
  • Combined effects of MPs with other pollutants;
  • Application of constructed wetlands in remediation of MPs—removal strategies, treatment efficiency.

Dr. Gabriela Kalčíková
Dr. Ludmiła Polechońska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aquatic organisms
  • aquatic pollution
  • biodegradation
  • ecotoxicity
  • contaminant interactions
  • microplastics
  • macrophytes, phytoremediation
  • constructed wetlands
  • wastewater treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 2793 KiB  
Article
The Role of Estuarine Wetlands (Saltmarshes) in Sediment Microplastics Retention
by C. Marisa R. Almeida, Iraide Sáez-Zamacona, Diogo M. Silva, Sabrina M. Rodrigues, Rúben Pereira and Sandra Ramos
Water 2023, 15(7), 1382; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15071382 - 3 Apr 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2296
Abstract
Concerns regarding plastic pollution, especially microplastics, have increased, as they can be present in different environmental compartments, including estuarine areas and saltmarshes. Although saltmarshes are highly vulnerable to different human activities and pressures, they have the ability to trap/retain contaminants in their vegetated [...] Read more.
Concerns regarding plastic pollution, especially microplastics, have increased, as they can be present in different environmental compartments, including estuarine areas and saltmarshes. Although saltmarshes are highly vulnerable to different human activities and pressures, they have the ability to trap/retain contaminants in their vegetated sediments. However, there is still little information regarding the role of saltmarshes in microplastic retention. Thus, the present study aims to investigate the capability of an estuarine saltmarsh to trap microplastics by comparing microplastic concentrations in vegetated (saltmarsh) and non-vegetated sediments. Microplastic content from sediment (vegetated and non-vegetated) samples collected at different sampling sites in Lima River estuary was estimated using previously optimised extraction protocols, and the observed particles were then characterised accordingly to their size, colour, shape, and polymer (by FTIR). Water samples were also collected and analysed for their microplastics content to complement MPs characterisation within the estuarine area. Microplastics were detected in all sediment samples, with fibres being the most common type of microplastic found, followed by fragments/particles. Overall, vegetated sediments, especially those of saltmarsh species Juncus maritimus, presented a higher number of plastic items. These results indicated that microplastics tend to be trapped in vegetated sediments, supporting the fact that saltmarshes have a significant influence on the transport, distribution, and accumulation of MPs in estuarine areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microplastics in Wetlands: Occurrence, Fate and Interactions)
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14 pages, 3930 KiB  
Article
Identification, Abundance, and Distribution of Microplastics in Surface Water Collected from Luruaco Lake, Low Basin Magdalena River, Colombia
by René A. Rojas-Luna, Luisa Oquendo-Ruiz, Carlos A. García-Alzate, Victoria A. Arana, Roberto García-Alzate and Jorge Trilleras
Water 2023, 15(2), 344; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15020344 - 13 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3037
Abstract
There are few studies on microplastic (MP) contamination in Colombia, and little is known about its impacts on continental aquatic ecosystems. This study evaluated, for the first time, the identification, abundance, and distribution of MP particles in the surface water of Luruaco Lake, [...] Read more.
There are few studies on microplastic (MP) contamination in Colombia, and little is known about its impacts on continental aquatic ecosystems. This study evaluated, for the first time, the identification, abundance, and distribution of MP particles in the surface water of Luruaco Lake, in the low basin of the Magdalena River, Colombia, included in national programs in marine sciences and hydrobiological resources. Six stations and four samplings were established in the dry and rainy seasons. A total of 72 water samples were collected for microplastic extraction using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) digestion, density separation with sodium chloride solution (NaCl), and filtration. The abundance of MPs ranged from 0 to 3.83 MPs·L−1, with an average of 1.90 MPs·L−1 in the rainy season and 0.25 MPs·L−1 in the dry season. According to the calculated coefficient of microplastics impact, the contamination in the surface water of Luruaco Lake is “maximum” to “extreme” for fibers with an average length of 2.05 mm and “minimum” to “average” for fragments that are 0.35 mm in size on average. Polyester (PES, 57.9%), polystyrene (PS, 47.0%), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET, 35.3%) polymers were more abundant in surface water. The temporal variation of the MPs indicates contamination related to the discharges of the tributary streams to the lake in the rainy season. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microplastics in Wetlands: Occurrence, Fate and Interactions)
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